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1d
comment Why are all pronunciations of each letter voiced or voiceless?
@Yishai, an excellent point. I'll edit it when I have time to do so, bl"n.
2d
comment Why are all pronunciations of each letter voiced or voiceless?
@user6591 I don't understand your comment.
2d
comment Why are all pronunciations of each letter voiced or voiceless?
[cont'd] Rather, by "Why", @WAF, I mean to ask what (Torah-based) qualities are intrinsic to the letters or their pronunciation that influenced this curious turn of events that voicedness is uniform. Contrast e.g. a non-holy tongue like modern Hebrew, and you have people voicing הs etc. Even in vulgar l'shon kodesh, we see pos'kim warning us against saying "למען תשכרו", so obviously people devoice sounds. And yet in religion-defined language we don't. So, yes, this is a religion-based question.
2d
comment Why are all pronunciations of each letter voiced or voiceless?
@DoubleAA, among the questions we consider on-topic are those of "general knowledge (science, etc.) as it relates directly to Judaism". So even a linguistics question can be on-topic here. But this isn't a linguistics question. A linguistics question could be "Why did the sounds for each letter evolve in such a way?" -- but I'm asking about prescribed sounds, not sounds as evolved, and linguists (I think) aren't happy talking prescription. [cont'd]
2d
comment Why are all pronunciations of each letter voiced or voiceless?
I think it's on-topic because it's about proper pronunciation and not actual pronunciation. Why "proper pronunciation" has certain qualities is a religious question.
May
20
comment How are we kings' children and why does it matter?
+1; many thanks. But I don't see (in the passage you quote) anything about being sons of God.
May
20
comment Book of Joshua verse 1 & 2
What @yechezkel said. A somewhat better question IMO would be why God told Joshua that fact.
May
19
comment Am I Supposed to Believe that the Messiah is coming today, or that he is coming generally
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/33298
May
19
comment Am I Supposed to Believe that the Messiah is coming today, or that he is coming generally
That wording is not the Rambam's. It's merely based on his writings.
May
18
comment Adjusting timers on Shabbat
@PeterOlson, oh! You're quote right. I missed that. Thanks!
May
18
comment Adjusting timers on Shabbat
Doesn't the passage you quote contradict itself? It says that "one isn’t allowed to adjust the timer to switch on or off earlier than planned" but nonetheless says both that "one may adjust the timer to... delay the timer from switching the appliance off by pulling pins out" and that "one may adjust the timer to... delay an appliance that is off from coming on". Am I missing something?
May
18
comment Help with finding a Pirkei Avot Citation
See the update to the question.
May
18
comment What tribe did someone belong to if they didn't have a Jewish father?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/37787
May
17
comment Why does patrilineal descent determine who is royalty?
That the crown passes through the male line. (Which kinda implies that there are no queens, but that's a different issue.)
May
17
comment Why does patrilineal descent determine who is royalty?
It's worth noting that the rule was usually followed (absent insurgency). (See Kings, passim.)
May
17
comment Who broke the parshiyot into aliyot and how?
"in the case of reading a double parsha, why isn't the seventh aliyah of the double identical with what would be the seventh aliyah of the second parsha when it is read on its own?" I fail to see the benefit of this. "The determination that it should be 'seventh' was already made -- why change that": By the same logic, the fourth aliya should stretch from the first parasha's "r'vii" to the second's "chamishi". +1, though: good question as to provenance of our aliya boundaries.
May
17
comment On the Root 'ע'ט'פ (and 'ע'ט'ה)
The etymological note at Hebrew Wiktionary is interesting: it notes that the two meanings of ע־ט־פ seem to stem from different roots, notes the similar polysemy of ע־ל־פ, and quotes M'tzudas Tziyon's explanation (at Yona 2:8) relating the two meanings of ע־ט־פ ("when someone is in trouble, he is pained and bent as if his one end is wrapped in his other").
May
17
comment Why is torah different to other studies
chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/message/21678997#21678997 et seqq.
May
17
comment You're on a date in a park in the evening, what should you avoid to ensure the proper yichud rules are addressed?
@Daniel, the other way around (Rama 22:5, q.v.).
May
17
comment Do we have a right to not be ambassadors?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/59266