7,818 reputation
1438
bio website
location
age
visits member for 2 years, 9 months
seen 6 mins ago

Jan
28
comment Where are the Mishnas in the Talmud?
This sounds to me like the sort of resource that it would be fun to compile for yourself - and you'll likely learn a great deal in the process.
Jan
27
answered How can we chastise Bilaam for using the same word as Hashem did?
Jan
27
answered Are there any jokes in the Geonim or Rishonim?
Jan
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
26
answered Source of Ramban's famous debate
Dec
17
comment In what sense is Hanukkah “a Yom Tov like other yamim tovim”?
Regarding your second point, note that Rosh haShana is a yom tov, but we don't say hallel.
Dec
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
17
asked In what sense is Hanukkah “a Yom Tov like other yamim tovim”?
Dec
15
comment Dikduk Q: Rashi and Ibn Ezra on the Sar Hamashkim
Actually, @Jo.P, it relates more specifically to whether or not the verb can take a direct object - but the chief sign of an intransitive verb is its needing to take an indirect object instead (hence, with a preposition). Both transitive and intransitive verbs can also eschew the object altogether (eg: "he remembered", which is a transitive verb; "he jumped", which is intransitive). One can only differentiate between them when an object is involved: "he remembered the log"; "he jumped on the log". Hope my comment's less confusing now :)
Dec
15
comment Why is the wording “הערים האל” used? (Deut 4:42)
If you have a look at Kelley, Mynatt and Crawford's The Masorah of the Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (p105-106), you'll see that they bring this example, and that they note that the word is only profane insofar as האל does not refer to God. Your interpretation, while beautifully set out, reads a bit more like a drash. Sorry, but I agree with @IsaacMoses - your reading of this meaning into other passages that feature the same word is an example of "overfitting".
Dec
15
comment Dikduk Q: Rashi and Ibn Ezra on the Sar Hamashkim
In other words, Ibn Ezra (acc. to the Avi Ezer) is taking זכר in this instance as synonymous with the hiphil, הזכיר, but this is problematic for other reasons. Chiefly is the fact that זכר turns up with a direct object over a hundred times in Tanakh, and everybody understands it to mean "remember" in all but a handful of instances. So I cannot explain this passage at all (if the Avi Ezer is correct, it is very, very strange), but I would suppose that Rashi's response would have simply been to say that זכר is a transitive verb, and that it means "remember". No big chiddush there.
Dec
15
comment Dikduk Q: Rashi and Ibn Ezra on the Sar Hamashkim
An excellent question; this passage in the Avi Ezer is really difficult to justify. I cannot answer it, but I need to note that your understanding of transitivity appears to be misguided. It has nothing to do with whether or not the verb denotes a physical effect upon the object, but only upon whether or not the object requires a preposition. In your fourth paragraph, both "mention" and "remember" are transitive verbs. An example of an intransitive verb (and perhaps how the Avi Ezer thinks that Ibn Ezra understands זכר) is "reminisce". The cupbearer cannot "reminisce Joseph", for example.
Dec
14
comment Abel was a shepherd, wasn't it a crime?
@user8558 - if Jewish sources are explicit about this then you should include some Jewish sources in your question. It's not an open verse, but a drash that enables people to conclude that animals were not slaughtered for food before Noah's being commanded in that regard. I wouldn't make the assumption that every person who reads this question is familiar with that interpretation.
Dec
14
comment Abel was a shepherd, wasn't it a crime?
This is a very nice question, but I think it requires a justification for its second half. How do you know that slaughtering animals wasn't allowed before the flood? That's not necessarily a universally-held opinion.
Dec
11
asked Making restitution for a “missing” ox: a question on the Mishna
Dec
9
answered Are there Ribbis implications in this transaction and what are they?
Dec
9
answered Where is the Yabbok crossing?
Dec
4
comment What are the three Terumots?
@Shokhet - Short answer is yes: Devarim 12:17 mentions תרומת ידך, which is explained in Sifrei Devarim as a reference to Bikkurim (see Rashi, who quotes the midrash). See also Makkot 17a ("ותרומת ידך אלו בכורים") and the commentaries on Terumot 3:7, Maaser Sheni 5:6 and Bikkurim 2:1 (amongst other places).
Dec
4
comment What are the three Terumots?
Note that bikkurim is also called reishit.
Nov
25
accepted Who Commanded Us, and For What?