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Feb
19
revised Becoming Deaf and Mute
Made the question clearer, and took into account a comment beneath it
Feb
19
asked Becoming Deaf and Mute
Feb
19
comment why cure the snake bites with the nehushtan
Sorry - I wasn't meaning to imply that this is a technique that Ramban is endorsing, but that his interpretation is similar. He refers, for example, to the manner in which Torah allows one to heal poison with more of that same poison (תסיר הנזק במזיק ותרפא החולי במחליא), and while he notes that the way of medicine is contrary, his remarks concerning just how contrary it is are also reminiscent: that one who was bitten by a rabid dog might see puppies in his urine, or that one bitten by a snake might get worse just by seeing a snake's blood.
Feb
19
comment Is tevel dough muktzah on yom tov?
Thanks, @DoubleAA, I didn't know that - nor enough to be able to answer this question, though I'm pretty sure you're not allowed to burn qodshim on yontef (is challah qodesh?). There's a discussion in Pesachim somewhere that might be informative. The relevant mishna is 3:3, which discusses separating impure challah on yontef Pesach. Not exactly the same question that is being asked here, but it might be relevant to a comprehensive answer.
Feb
19
answered why cure the snake bites with the nehushtan
Feb
18
comment Do other Chasidic communities follow Shulchan Aruch HaRav?
No need to edit: I think your question is already well-phrased. Just wanted to add my two cents :)
Feb
18
comment Do other Chasidic communities follow Shulchan Aruch HaRav?
Very few communities rely exclusively upon a single text. All Orthodox communities treat the Shulchan Arukh haRav as authoritative, but only Lubavitchers will ever treat it as ultimately authoritative. That is not to say that Lubavitchers will avoid studying other works. They treat it as many Litvaks treat the Mishne Berurah: authoritative to the point of being the final word, though not the only opinion. Likewise, many Sephardim now treat the halakha of the mechaber in a similar fashion (based upon the exhortations of Rav Ovadiah).
Feb
18
answered Is there a difference between “להלן” and “לקמן”?
Feb
14
comment Who wrote the anonymous explanations of Rashi printed within the text of Rashi?
I cannot put this in an answer, since I had this question a little while ago and I wasn't able to get it verified, but I think the individual responsible was Rabbi Shabbetai Bass, the author of Siftei Chachamim. I can't confirm that, sorry, so I don't know if it helps.
Feb
13
comment What's a floor?
I'm not sure, but I think one is also supposed to do some form of penance if the dropped sefer Torah lands elsewhere as well. In other words, if you fumble and drop the sefer Torah and it falls with a thud onto a table, I'm pretty sure that you still need to fast.
Feb
11
accepted Mishnayot in the Bavli
Feb
10
revised How long was Yosef in prison?
Fixed the reference to the Baal haTurim
Feb
10
answered How long was Yosef in prison?
Feb
10
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
You can find that lecture here
Feb
10
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
I'm not sure I can help you there, @Ali. To be honest, I don't really understand how you are defining shituf. I have never heard it used that way before, and the only proof that I can offer for it not being relevant here is that nobody (to the extent of my knowledge) has ever suggested that it is. I can't give you a source for that, since there's no source for something's absence. But I do recommend that you read up a little about shituf and what it does (and doesn't) mean. There's a good lecture by R' David Berger at YUTorah Online, which touches on the definition and usage of this word.
Feb
10
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
That aspect of the question I answered: no. The proof is that of the dozens of sources detailing the prohibition of using non-Jewish courts, not a single one of them employs that word. As for the second point, I read the question as asking about the general (im)permissibility of using non-Jewish courts, which is primarily what I set out to answer. Unless Ali writes a comment to the effect that that's not what he meant, I'm leaving it as it is. Feel free to mark it down if you think I missed the point of the question.
Feb
10
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
Oh, but isn't that obvious? How can halakhic sources possibly prohibit non-Jews bringing a case against Jews? Or Jews from appearing in non-Jewish courts when the courts are forcing them to do so?
Feb
10
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
How so? I would read every one of the sources that I listed as referring to all forms of litigation. You don't agree?
Feb
10
answered Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
Feb
9
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
There was a long-standing prohibition against having one's case heard (voluntarily) in a non-Jewish court, but it has nothing whatsoever to do with shituf, which is the prohibition of ascribing partnership to God.