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Oct
22
revised Authenticity and authority of Oral tradition
Removed the reference to the religion of the questioner, which was an assumption and irrelevant to my response.
Oct
22
comment Authenticity and authority of Oral tradition
My apologies, @Mahalia - I wasn't meaning to make any assumptions. Given that you commenced your question with a reference to Islam, I thought that you might have been. I shall edit my response accordingly. Of course, your religion is irrelevent to both the question and to my comment.
Oct
22
comment Authenticity and authority of Oral tradition
Like I say, I don't personally think that site is so relevant to the topic, but I'm not at all precious about my answer and I won't mind in the least if you want to add it :)
Oct
22
comment Authenticity and authority of Oral tradition
I don't mind you adding it if you want to, but I specifically mentioned the one I did because it deals with the sorts of claims made by Michael Hoffman and others. Torat Emet is very interesting too, but how does it relate to this issue?
Oct
22
answered Authenticity and authority of Oral tradition
Oct
21
answered Are there any jokes in tanach?
Oct
21
comment impure animals: present, future, past
By the way, there is a phenomenon in Biblical Hebrew of linguistic variation in lists. Leviticus 18 is a case in point. I've checked a handful of reference grammars (Gesenius, Joüon & Muraoka, Waltke & O'Connor, Van der Merwe), but cannot find one that deals with this passage in particular. I don't know if that's the sort of answer that you're looking for, though it may at least indicate that you'll find your answer elsewhere - ie: in a traditional commentary, but on a different biblical list.
Oct
21
comment impure animals: present, future, past
Great question, but the distinction between prefix-conjugation and suffix-conjugation in Biblical Hebrew is one of aspect, not tense. Technically, the difference between the three verbs is as follows: מפריס (masc. hiphil participle); יפריס (masc. hiphil imperfective); הפריסה (fem. hiphil perfective). The Or haChaim and the Ramban both comment on why the third is feminine but the other three (גמל, שפן, חזיר) are all masculine, but nobody seems to comment on the morphological variation.
Oct
21
comment Where is a mediator between God and man forbidden
Hanna's answer came from Eli? Eli spoke to her, and subsequently blessed her, but her "answer" came when she fell pregnant. I don't think he was responsible for that!
Oct
19
comment Why are children from a gentile wife not considered Jewish with a Jewish father?
Sorry, I was in a hurry. I merely meant that the idea mentioned in the body of the question was not the source of the halakha. I've removed my first line so that my answer addresses the question in the title more directly instead.
Oct
19
revised Why are children from a gentile wife not considered Jewish with a Jewish father?
Removed first line.
Oct
19
answered Why are children from a gentile wife not considered Jewish with a Jewish father?
Oct
17
comment וינוחו בה\בו\בם ישראל in Shabbat shemoneh esrei — why the change?
Thanks, @Michoel. That was my mistake: for some reason, I thought you (and the original question) said "mussaf" instead of "mishna". Pays to read things more carefully!
Oct
17
comment וינוחו בה\בו\בם ישראל in Shabbat shemoneh esrei — why the change?
@DoubleAA My apologies. For some reason, I read "mussaf" in the question, rather than "mincha". My bad.
Oct
17
comment How high was migdal Bavel?
Note that Ibn Ezra doesn't understand it as a valley, but as a plain. He suggests that it might have been termed a "valley" because it had mountains around it.
Oct
17
comment וינוחו בה\בו\בם ישראל in Shabbat shemoneh esrei — why the change?
Is that last part according to you or to the Rebbe? I have since checked a Tehillat Hashem and found that it records בה for erev Shabbat, and בו for both shacharit and mussaf on Shabbat.
Oct
17
comment וינוחו בה\בו\בם ישראל in Shabbat shemoneh esrei — why the change?
This is a great question, but can somebody please confirm that they have checked that it is correct? I have looked in two different siddurim, both nusach Ashkenaz, and they record בה for erev Shabbat, and בו for both shacharit and mussaf on Shabbat.
Oct
17
comment וינוחו בה\בו\בם ישראל in Shabbat shemoneh esrei — why the change?
To add to the points made above about gender, ליל is always and only ever masculine, just like לילה.
Oct
13
comment Jewish concept of angels
-1. The question asked for scriptural evidence, which you didn't provide. You also failed to bring a source for the rabbinic evidence that you did provide. If you add one, I'll remove my downvote.
Oct
10
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