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Mar
21
comment Where in the Torah does it says we cannot eat live anmals?
There are other reasons as well as to why live animals should not be consumed, such as the prohibition (derived by the rabbis but treated as biblical) of causing suffering to living animals. But yes, the prohibition against consuming blood only pertains to Jews. That said, it is unlike certain other prohibitions (such as abstaining from "labour" on Shabbat), in that non-Jews can also choose to observe it if they wish.
Mar
20
accepted Spitting at the High Priest on Yom Kippur
Mar
19
comment What is the significance of the place from which Eve was created?
A minor point, perhaps, but Eve was not created: she was "built".
Mar
19
comment Can a Rishon argue on a Gaon?
Sorry, @ShmuelBrin, I don't understand your question. Are you referring to a particular passage in the Rambam or to one of his klalim?
Mar
19
comment Can a Rishon argue on a Gaon?
Rishonim don't argue on the gemara? I think that the Rambam ignoring the gemara's reasons for mitzvot and making up his own probably counts as "arguing on the gemara". As does his occasionally siding with extra-Talmudic sources, like the Tosefta.
Mar
19
comment Spitting at the High Priest on Yom Kippur
Thank you, @MeirZirkind - I hadn't actually considered that distinction here, but the Tosafot makes more sense to me now. Could I trouble you to please incorporate it into your answer, and to change the final reference from 56:2 to 56b? Thank you so much.
Mar
19
awarded  Necromancer
Mar
15
comment Good Talmudic Grammar resource for one unfamiliar with grammar in general?
I think you might be making a mistake to look for a book on Aramaic grammar that is going to do everything for you. I think you need a book on Aramaic grammar, and a book on grammar in general (terminology, etc).
Mar
15
comment Was it always the kohen who slaughtered the korbanot?
@MonicaCellio - I don't have it handy either, but I seem to remember the Mishna in Pesachim making it clear that anyone can slaughter the animal, but only the kohanim can sprinkle the blood.
Mar
14
comment Can God destroy Himself?
This might sound like a facetious question, but why is it necessary to believe that God can do everything? Our sources are replete with passages that concern his disappointment or regret. Your hashkafa might tell you otherwise, but I see nothing in Tanakh or the early rabbinic literature to lead me to such a perspective. Existence appears to be a necessary quality of God, along with his singularity.
Mar
14
comment Can God destroy Himself?
[cont.] In this case, God's inability to destroy himself represents a limitation in the existence of God. It is a more profound paradox than the one with the rock.
Mar
14
comment Can God destroy Himself?
Very much disagree with your analogy. God can create a rock so heavy that he cannot pick it up, and then he cannot pick it up. But that's not a limitation of God, it's a limitation of the rock. So too, God cannot play the first move in a game of chess and get checkmate immediately. None of the twenty possible opening moves results in checkmate. That's a limitation of chess, not of God. And yet God could invent the game of chess. Likewise, he can invent something else, the rules of which prevent his circumventing them. Like a square circle, etc.
Mar
13
comment Origin of the term Yoshke?
@sam - No it isn't, it's in the Bavli (Hagigah 15a). The corresponding section in the Yerushalmi (Hagigah 77b-c, 2.1) says nothing at all about how he got his name. It was the story in the Bavli to which I was referring: the one with the prostitute in the field, who knows that he is Elisha ben Abuya but who refers to him as "somebody else". That story is just that. A story. Invented to explain why he was called Acher in the Mishna, but not the actual reason for his having been called that. The actual reason is simply the Mishna's dismissiveness of him.
Mar
13
revised Where in the Torah does it says we cannot eat live anmals?
Fixed grammar
Mar
13
revised How to say Adonainu Moreinu VeRabeinu in Aramaic
Fixed a lexical error: I was treating *maran* and *rabban* as singular absolute nouns.
Mar
13
comment How to say Adonainu Moreinu VeRabeinu in Aramaic
Argh. Sorry, @SethJ - that's my stupidity. Let's call it a momentary lapse of reason :) Don't know why but my brain configured maran and rabban as the words that I was adding the suffix to. Fixing that now!
Mar
13
comment How to say Adonainu Moreinu VeRabeinu in Aramaic
@SethJ - Yes, I'm positive. Unfortunately, Biblical Aramaic doesn't differentiate between the singular and the plural noun when they feature a first person plural suffix, but BT Aramaic does. If you wanted to pluralise each of those nouns, you would get Adonayin Maranayin veRabbanayin. (As Frank points out, the "common" pronunciation of this would be Adonin Maranin veRabbanin).
Mar
13
comment How to say Adonainu Moreinu VeRabeinu in Aramaic
@ShmuelBrin, No - that's also in Babylonian Aramaic. The definite article is an aleph on the ends of words whichever Aramaic you are speaking. I only included that part in my first paragraph because you asked about that in relation to the word adonana. Sorry if that was confusing of me.
Mar
13
answered How to say Adonainu Moreinu VeRabeinu in Aramaic
Mar
13
awarded  Informed