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Feb
10
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
I'm not sure I can help you there, @Ali. To be honest, I don't really understand how you are defining shituf. I have never heard it used that way before, and the only proof that I can offer for it not being relevant here is that nobody (to the extent of my knowledge) has ever suggested that it is. I can't give you a source for that, since there's no source for something's absence. But I do recommend that you read up a little about shituf and what it does (and doesn't) mean. There's a good lecture by R' David Berger at YUTorah Online, which touches on the definition and usage of this word.
Feb
10
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
That aspect of the question I answered: no. The proof is that of the dozens of sources detailing the prohibition of using non-Jewish courts, not a single one of them employs that word. As for the second point, I read the question as asking about the general (im)permissibility of using non-Jewish courts, which is primarily what I set out to answer. Unless Ali writes a comment to the effect that that's not what he meant, I'm leaving it as it is. Feel free to mark it down if you think I missed the point of the question.
Feb
10
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
Oh, but isn't that obvious? How can halakhic sources possibly prohibit non-Jews bringing a case against Jews? Or Jews from appearing in non-Jewish courts when the courts are forcing them to do so?
Feb
10
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
How so? I would read every one of the sources that I listed as referring to all forms of litigation. You don't agree?
Feb
10
answered Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
Feb
9
comment Do jews find it blasphemy to be judged by religious laws of the pagan country they live in
There was a long-standing prohibition against having one's case heard (voluntarily) in a non-Jewish court, but it has nothing whatsoever to do with shituf, which is the prohibition of ascribing partnership to God.
Feb
8
comment Halachic authority of books
This is a massive question, and you should be aware that the attitudes you reference, to a large extent, only came into existence with the invention of Orthodoxy - not with the publication of the Shulchan Arukh. What you are asking is likely to be answered from the perspective of hashkafa. There are plenty of examples of both rishonim and acharonim impugning earlier authorities, and effectively siding with the mishna, the tosefta or the yerushalmi over the bavli and other rishonim.
Feb
8
comment Audio/Video Recordings of Tefilloth/Prayers
I don't have time to research this now, but there's a mishna in Rosh haShana to the effect that you cannot fulfil your obligation of hearing the shofar if the person blowing it is inside a barrel or a tank or a pit. The reasoning, according to the gemara, is that you are not hearing the shofar but its echo. This is pertinent to your issue, seeing as you are not hearing the person's voice, but its synthetic transmission. You'd have to follow that gemara k'hilkheta, which I've not the time to do (sorry). Also, I love Cantor Helfgott. He should never be muted :)
Feb
6
comment Yichud with someone who can't have an erection
I would assume that there would be plenty of "other forms of physical contact that might be ossur between these 2 people", which don't require him to have an erection. Unless your question is dealing with a specific case (in which case, I would advise that you CYLR), it might be better phrased in such a manner that the man in it is completely incapable of performing any activity with the woman that would be defined as ervah.
Feb
2
comment Why does Onkelos translate “לֹֽא יוּכַל” as “לָא יִכּוֹל” rather than “לֵית לֵיהּ רְשׁוּ”
Why do you say that in both verses it means the same thing? Surely the difference between them should be enough to indicate that while Rashi might have thought they both meant the same thing, Onkelos did not.
Jan
31
comment Why is Shekalim in the Bavli?
Thanks, @ba. The article he quotes from On The Main Line is very informative, though his answer itself is flawed. He mentions the geonim including this masekhta because it was cheap to print, though the geonim lived centuries before Gutenberg. The blog post that he links to mentions the same information, but from the 16th century. I'm happy to go with that.
Jan
31
asked Why is Shekalim in the Bavli?
Jan
31
comment Is every mishna mentioned in the Bavli?
Thanks, DoubleAA. Direct and to-the-point! (I checked, and have since found other mishnayot around that one that also go unmentioned).
Jan
31
accepted Is every mishna mentioned in the Bavli?
Jan
31
asked Is every mishna mentioned in the Bavli?
Jan
31
revised Mishnayot in the Bavli
Breaking a question into two
Jan
31
comment Mishnayot in the Bavli
Mesoret haShas is good if the Shas is your object of study, but not if your object of study is the Mishna. For that, you could use Mesoret haShas in order to compile such an index, though it would take a long time, and it would require you to go through the entire Bavli. I would rather target a particular mishna, then see everywhere in the Bavli (and Yerushalmi) that the sages refer to it.
Jan
31
answered Which Talmudic source for Ḥanukah is the real source?
Jan
31
asked Mishnayot in the Bavli
Jan
31
comment Clairvoyant Powers
I think the issue here hinges on precisely how he's doing this. Certainly, some people might say that he's a fraud (even if he's a well-intentioned one), and that such tricks amount to "magic" and are, therefore, unreal. By others, however, there is a custom of seeking advice from such individuals. Similar powers are often attributed to Rabbi Yitzhak Kaduri, for example, and this is no different (practically speaking) to the advice that hasidim receive from their rebbes. For that reason, I think that some may dislike it, but none will be able to say that it's actually wrong.