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שויתי ה' לנגדי תמיד

SOreadytohelp


Jun
20
comment Mishna Demai 5:11: why can't you take teruma from vadai on demai?
Ah, I hadn't got to Terumos yet, so I didn't know that mishna. :) But it just pushes the question to there. Why can't you take teruma from chayav on patur?
Jun
20
comment Mishna Demai 5:11: why can't you take teruma from vadai on demai?
I don't see how you can read that he took the entire vadai and made it teruma for the demai. Then the mishna (or Kehati at least!) should have denoted somehow that the reason it does not work is because of that technicality that you can't declare an entire crop as teruma. According to what you're saying, if he only took part of the vadai as teruma it should be good - but that's not what the mishna says. In several places Kehati states that מעשר מן החייב על הפטור is ineffective, in general, not just when you exhaust the חייב. Why is that?
Apr
24
comment List of Number of Mishnayos by chapter / masechta
תזכה למצוות! Thank you so much!
Apr
11
comment Is Coca Cola (and other beverages) kosher everywhere in the world?
Wow, that's an eye opener. Thanks!
Dec
25
comment What is “blood that moved from one place to another”?
For the record, the Rosh defines "blood that moved" specifically as having left the meat altogether; he seems to be your primary source for your paragraph beginning "There are opinions..."
Dec
24
comment What is “blood that moved from one place to another”?
@Menachem I believe you are right. See the Tur on YD 67. Please post as an answer for credit. Thanks!
Dec
20
comment What is “blood that moved from one place to another”?
@Menachem Sounds like an interesting theory. Do you have any citations to back it up?
Dec
19
comment What is “blood that moved from one place to another”?
@DoubleAA You seem to be defining "poresh" as leaving the piece of meat altogether. The Shach is defining "poresh" as one drop of blood moving one millimeter within a capillary.
Dec
19
comment What is “blood that moved from one place to another”?
@DoubleAA So let's assume "dam eivarim" is blood in the capillaries after the heart stops pumping. What is the logic behind prohibiting blood that has "moved", while permitting blood that has remained stationary? Remember, just a few minutes ago, that blood was all moving. So when does the "lock" happen? At the moment of shechita? No way; the blood is gushing out the animal. When the heart stops beating? Technically, the animal was already dead the moment the simanim were cut. So you could have already carved up the animal and started salting it before the heart stopped...
Dec
19
comment What is “blood that moved from one place to another”?
@DoubleAA - I didn't make any judgments about chalita; I'm learning about melicha now. It's quite possible that when I get there, I'll raise another question about chalita, as you say... :)
Aug
15
comment How could boiling 3 eggs at a time help?
@CHM - 60% != 1/60. You need 60 parts kosher to nullify the forbidden taste, i.e. 98.4%
Aug
1
comment How could boiling 3 eggs at a time help?
@DoubleAA - Regarding them all having the same taste, that's exactly the case that YD 109:2 is dealing with, where you have min b'mino, i.e. the same taste, and you still require 60:1 to nullify the issur.
Aug
1
comment How could boiling 3 eggs at a time help?
@DoubleAA - have you ever had a chullent with whole eggs in it? The eggs fully absorb the meat taste. So yes, eggshells are porous.
Jul
31
comment How could boiling 3 eggs at a time help?
That's talking about yavesh b'yavesh, where there's no taste transfer. Our case is where one part treif was cooked with 2 parts kosher. In which case you need 60:1 to nullify the taste. Yoreh Deah 109:2 - thanks for the link!
Jun
20
comment Why is techeles not universally accepted?
This is not the same as kashrus of food, where there's an actual issur to eat neveila, basar b'chalav etc. Kala ilan involves an issur of deception, where someone is tricking someone else into thinking that this is real techeles; here the avaryan is the trickster, not the person who wears the fake techeles - unless they happen to be the same person and the fool thinks he can trick G-d. But if someone has determined, to the best of their ability, that this is "real" techeles, there is at least no loss in wearing it, and possibly an aseh d'oraysa to gain.
Jun
19
comment Why is techeles not universally accepted?
I believe the accepted answer judaism.stackexchange.com/a/8853/159 addresses your approach directly.
Jun
18
comment Why is techeles not universally accepted?
How does this relate to the question?
Jun
7
comment Why is Judaism not Racism?
That's a pretty weird comment, @Sam. You'll have to justify several sweeping statements in there if you want a serious response.
Mar
21
comment If the last day of Passover is Friday, may I eat chametz on the Shabbat right after?
But then how do you buy back the chometz on shabbos?
Mar
6
comment Need some good Russian Purim/kiruv links
+1 Thanks - that's great!