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seen Mar 20 '13 at 20:02

Sep
21
comment Saying slichos at any time but “ashmores haboker”, should we take out references to the early morning time so we are not “lying”?
Thank you. Perhaps the next editions of the Slichos should "flag" those words that people need to consider before saying them. It seems most people are unaware of this and I am yet to find a minyan where this was done.
Sep
12
comment Saying Misod and Reshut (introduction) for piyutim, then skipping them
b a- Also, the Reshus said in Shachris is clearly an introduction to the piyut that follows: "At Chil Yom Pekuda". These piyutim of Hakalir on first day of RH (who lived in Eretz Yisrael) were seen in such high regards that a poetic introduction was composed hundreds of years later in Europe. Who are we to neglect them, and then scream out with so much Kavanah this later "introduction" to them completely out of context (just because some printer of the machzor once put in a note that the Aron is open from the Reshus and closed for the actual piyutim)?
Sep
12
comment Saying Misod and Reshut (introduction) for piyutim, then skipping them
b a - I agree that Misod is an introduction to the series of piyutim said, but it is clear that it particularly relates to the piyutim that follow immediately. Otherwise, why don't we say Misod on the second day of RH, when these piyutim between the brachos are not said but we still have many other piyutim later on including Unesane Tokef, Chol Maaminim etc..? Further, it makes no sense to say Misod in Musaf without any piyut that follows immediately and just go to Zachreinu. When we introduce the idea of piyut, it's because we're about to say one!
Sep
12
comment Saying Misod and Reshut (introduction) for piyutim, then skipping them
msh210 - Sorry if I wasn't clear. I was asking in #1 specifically about the rationale of saying Misod and the Reshus that follows and then skipping the piyutim that they introduce, being that it seems very inconsistent. The question about yotzros in general, as you said, is a separate question. This is a question about saying an introduction and then skipping the piyut. Same question would apply to those who say "ohr olam" in bircos shma (also an introduction to the yotzros, as can be seen in the machzor on other yamim tovim), and then skipping the actual yotzros.
Sep
11
comment Saying Misod and Reshut (introduction) for piyutim, then skipping them
Also, the Reshus is clearly a later introduction (see Saks Machzor for example) to the earlier piyut of Hakalir. How can they let go of this much earlier piyut, and just interrupt the davening with a later introduction to the piyut they are skipping, completely out of context?
Sep
11
comment Saying Misod and Reshut (introduction) for piyutim, then skipping them
Thanks. This is related but doesn't answer the question here. We are talking about longer piyutim that require Misod (unlike in Mussaf of Shkalim/Hachodesh), but the Misod cannot (from what I understand) be referring just to Melech Elyon/Hashem Melech which is what many yeshivos say, since the piyut always immediately follows Misod. Otherwise, why do we interrupt the chazarah with Misod at this point if not to add in these very "lofty" piyutim?
Jul
23
comment What are the oldest Jewish songs (tune plus words) that are still popular today?
Yes, I have heard the same thing about the ashkenazi tune for L'dovid Baruch, and that in fact it is very similar to the Sephardi tune, having both originated at a common source. It is commonly sung in Yekki shuls and some Eastern European shuls (particularly in some litvish minyanim in Israel). I'm not sure why the singing of L'dovid Boruch has been completely abandoned in most Ashkenazi shuls today when it is mentioned by the Rema, found in most siddurim, and traditionally sung to one of our most ancient (and in my opinion, beautiful) niggunim.
Jun
26
comment Yotzros and Musaf for the 4 Parshios
do they also say Krovetz on Purim?
Jun
18
comment Pirkei Avos on shabbos during mincha?
Minhag Ashkenaz was not necessarily to recite it out loud (though this is the Sephardi custom, and seems to also be the Italian custom), it was to recite it quietly just like Ashkenazim recite most other parts of the davening, but as part of the tefillah, before Aleinu (and I think followed by Kaddish). This gives it more prominence as part of the davening (just like by Sfiras Haomer, which is said in most places before Aleinu), rather than something people say afterward. Does chabad recite it before Aleinu, or after?
May
29
comment Marovis on Yom Tov
Thanks for that response. It's amazing how the small community in Toledo preserves this age-old Minhag while many (perhaps most) people I've spoken to in some very large Jewish centers don't even know what Marovis is.