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seen May 6 at 17:56

May
18
awarded  Supporter
May
18
comment Drinking the wine that spills over the cup during Kiddush
Isn't the very presence of the spilled wine the reason for the blessing? How could that which causes the blessing, and is blessed, be unfit for consumption?
May
18
comment Drinking the wine that spills over the cup during Kiddush
How is it possible for any the wine of the kiddush cup to be considered klipa, regardless if it is spilled or not? Doesn't the bracha include any or all of it? If I make a blessing on orange juice and spill a bit, the spilled portion is now unclean? This does not compute.
May
17
comment Moshe talking to the Mizbeach?
If you are to follow the links provided, it is a description of contextual referencing and antecedents based on Rashi and his methods of derivation. It's a sound analysis of the antecedent question you posed.
May
17
comment Jewish Status of the Patriarch's Wives?
Regardless of when a word comes into use, its application is still valid. Assassins existed before its borrowing into English in 1525 and can be labeled as such. Gentile is defined as "belonging to the same family as all non-Jews." We've stated it's impossible to classify either men as Jews. Gentile is perfectly applicable to both, even though one is the clear forefather of the Jewish people. At this time, someone who lived in New England in prior to the Constitution is not considered a U.S. citizen, even though the term was not extant. Abraham not a Jew? Perfectly legal to say Gentile.
May
17
comment Moshe talking to the Mizbeach?
I've used Nu06-17b as an example of contextual antecedents for the pasuk in the original question. @AriA
May
17
comment Jewish Status of the Patriarch's Wives?
@Dan This interpretation doesn't explain why the pasuk "walked" occurs before the mention of the revelation. It didn't take a revelation for Noach's belief. So we've concluded that Abraham and Noach are neither Jew nor Gentile. They're monotheists. Funny, that the definition of someone who is not a Jew is a gentile, which ostensibly includes anyone before the establishment of that term. Nor do I think Noach and Abraham can be distinguished by any other term than monotheist, regardless of their different methods of practice or faith as you presented.
May
17
comment Jewish Status of the Patriarch's Wives?
@Dan The pasuk "Noach walked with G-d" is proof he followed G-d's ways prior to any prophetic revelation. Rambam points out this refers to conduct. chabad.org/parshah/article_cdo/aid/757296/jewish/…
May
17
revised Silent aleph (no, I mean really silent)
added 229 characters in body
May
17
answered Silent aleph (no, I mean really silent)
May
17
comment Jewish Status of the Patriarch's Wives?
@Dan The very fact that the Noahide laws derive that title show Noach is a gentile inner.org/nonjews/kabbalah-for-nations-introduction.php. I am not talking about the differences in monotheistic practice between Noah and Abraham, or between the two men themselves, but rather, how one is typically regarded as "righteous gentile," and someone like Abraham is not. If Abraham isn't a Jew, as you say, then what is he? Monotheistic practicer? Are both he and Noach then just monotheistic practicers?
May
16
comment Jewish Status of the Patriarch's Wives?
@Dan So what then is the distinction between a monotheistic follower such as Noach and Abraham? One is distinctly noted as a gentile, the other not.
May
16
asked Jewish Status of the Patriarch's Wives?
May
16
awarded  Teacher
May
16
answered Moshe talking to the Mizbeach?
May
15
comment How do you pronounce Hashem's name when there is a prefix?
@Shemmy We can only assume.
May
15
revised How do you pronounce Hashem's name when there is a prefix?
added 1271 characters in body
May
15
comment How do you pronounce Hashem's name when there is a prefix?
@Shemmy For a list of all exceptions, see ou.org/torah/tt/5762/shavuot62/dav.htm
May
15
comment How do you pronounce Hashem's name when there is a prefix?
@Shemmy Apparently from what I've quoted there are 7 exceptions in Tanakh. This question was really about the why, and while there is this mnemonic and rule, there isn't a real basis or rationale for it. If you look at the jewish america link, there is a discussion of why Mem acts as it does, as it's part of the preposition Min. That's closer to an origin, and the original question.
May
14
awarded  Commentator