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seen Oct 25 '12 at 16:03

Sep
10
comment When you're trapped by someone Davening behind you
Sounds familiar. The Taz is a lone opinion as well, but used beshaas hadechak.
Sep
10
comment Can one use a water butt(s) as a keli mikvah?
@DoubleAA, I would think netila would either need a keli, a mikve mayim (some are lenient that it just has to have enough to cover the hands) that isn't zochalin or a mayan. I wouldn't think a flowing faucet qualifies for that part.
Sep
9
comment Amira Lakum: say you can't say?
@yehuda True, shutting it off is not benefiting from the guf hamelacha. Turning it on is more problematic, but, as you implied, if a person gets sick from the heat, he is a choleh and may ask directly.
Sep
9
comment Making mistakes in shemone esri
How are you distinguishing a shatz from anyone davening a private tefilla who makes a mistake? Are you asking if we replace the shatz?
Sep
6
comment Onot perisha with birth control
He must mean that the chavod daas would say that the terumas hadeshen applies it here as well (as opposed to those who only apply the terumas hadeshen to bedikos). But the chavos daas himself (186:3) argues on the terumas hadeshen's entire idea.
Sep
5
comment Bracha for fruit that is part of the meal
@AvrohomYitzchok, related. Not a duplicate.
Sep
5
comment Bracha for fruit that is part of the meal
I recall the hilchos Brachos book (not the Forst one) discusses different scenarios- fruit plates, appetizers, side dishes. I do remember it saying that if your meal is a fruit plate, you do not make a bracha. I don't have the book, and I'm not comfortable remembering anything else.
Sep
5
comment Onot perisha with birth control
Dov, I think that is referring to the couple checking themselves. Eg. they need not check prior to 14 days. Regarding separation diring the onah, I think there is a similar concept that is disputed in the achronim. I'll have to dig up a source later.
Sep
5
comment Onot perisha with birth control
@Mark, see my comment above.
Sep
5
comment Onot perisha with birth control
@Dave, actually, I originally thought that was so even by an aino kavua, but acc. to Taz 189:20, anything not kavua becomes undone with 1 opposing incident.
Sep
5
comment Teachings of Chabad (Lubavitch) - controversial or not?
@mochinrechavim, if you have a source that chabad teachings are controversial, why don't you post that as an answer?
Sep
4
comment Teachings of Chabad (Lubavitch) - controversial or not?
@mochinrechavim, I don't know that anything that you said has any validity as you haven't validated these statements with any sources. Either way, I don't see how any of that is controversial unless something unusual was instituted because of that.
Sep
2
comment Ose shalom post shemona esre
@DoubleAA, I think the idea from the gemara would answermy first 2 questions. It seems that the "shalom" is part of the petira (separate from the shemona esre). Although I am not sure what "yiten shalom" means in that context.
Aug
31
comment Can one say amen to a blessing invoked by a Christian?
A cursory reading of the SA would assume the author is continuing the same case- where one did not hear the entire blessing, with the exception of the final case (or 2 acc. to MB) which is a regular Jew who changed the required text of an instituted blessing albeit the entire blessing was said. The MB, however, applies the final case(s) retroactively where the Kusi/apikorus said the entire blessing as well, but their intent may be different. I don't know believe that approach is muchrach.
Aug
30
comment Can one say amen to a blessing invoked by a Christian?
Dov, please incorporate how the Mishna Berura learns the SA (to come out like you), though we still need to hash out if the Gra would argue in my case as well.
Aug
30
comment Can one say amen to a blessing invoked by a Christian?
Dov, there doesn't seem to be any indication from the SA since that is referring to not hearing the entire bracha. Also, @ba, that Rema seems to be talking about someone who worships an idol named, say, Shazam!, but make an appropriate blessing to G-d. In my case, he uses the word god implying the Almighty, but has a different idea of what that is. Although Mishna Berura SK10 there may deal with my case.
Aug
30
comment Origin of the nine days
@soandos, it wasn't extended. Communities took upon themselves to mourn more that. The extent of the mourning was up to the communities. Obviously some mourning periods were extended since restricting ones self for a small amount of time would not show mourning (such as doing laundry and haircutting). Others did show mourning and were too burdensome to extend (like eating 2 foods). You may want to ask something like how do customs develop, how are they incorporated into law and what status do they have in relation to talmudic law.
Aug
30
comment Origin of the nine days
From the question and comments above (prior to your edit), your question seemed to be: I understand that originally the law was less and then people added on, but why would people add on something that was rejected by the gemara. My answer targeted that- it is something meritorious, but not required from the gemara. You now seem to be asking a different question.
Aug
30
comment Pronunciation for אלוהים הוא אלוהים שלי
Eliahu (Elijah) He is my G-d. Try not to learn too much Hebrew from Google translate.
Aug
29
comment Teachings of Chabad (Lubavitch) - controversial or not?
@DoubleAA, I know that the problems started with some of the 6th Lubavitcher rebbe's action relating to bringing geula which culminated with a Lubavitch publication that mishnayos need to be learned for their nistar (with a drasha on shor shenagach). This created a big backlash from many gedolim at the time. (My rav said his rosh hayeshiva made a very big deal about it upon reading it). The above controversy is partially at the root of some of today's controversies.