10,606 reputation
11749
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 1 month
seen May 21 at 1:09

May
15
comment Must one pray with a minyan?
My understanding has been that if a minyan is meeting within "one mil" of you, you are required to attend. Otherwise, you should still try to attend, but it is not a formal obligation. I'm not sure that mil in this context is literally meant as a measure of distance. Instead, it may mean k'dei hiluch mil (i.e. approximately 18 minutes away by whatever means of transport is available). Also, if you are traveling in that direction and passing there anyway on your journey, there's a formal requirement to continue for "four mil" to attend a minyan.
May
15
comment ADHD and Ameilus B'Torah
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/31303. This involves the same principle as in the other question, namely that ameilus does not imply that you need to burden yourself with inefficiencies. There's a story from the 1930's: Canadian politician William Aberhart observed construction workers digging with shovels and picks. He asked them why they weren't using heavy machinery, which would increase efficiency and productivity. When he was told that this method allowed for the hiring of more laborers, he replied that the workers should dig with spoons, then, to create even more work.
May
15
comment Does the Talmud have a source for the horoscope?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/29909, judaism.stackexchange.com/q/52930, and judaism.stackexchange.com/q/7470.
May
15
comment Why do we avoid inviting people to a b'rit milah specifically, and not other celebrations too?
Actually, the Rama doesn't directly mention the idea to avoid inviting people, but the Pischei T'shuva (YD 265:18) cites the מקום שמואל (number 80) in the name of the Sharvit HaZahav as the source for this custom. The Rama just mentions that someone who avoids attending a circumcision feast is considered as if he is excommunicated by Heaven.
May
15
comment Why do we avoid inviting people to a b'rit milah specifically, and not other celebrations too?
...Essentially, a Jewish wedding feast is considered a mitzva feast (see P'sachim 49, and this article for some proofs of this), and it may even be a higher level of mitzva feast than for a circumcision (see, for e.g., Bei'ur HaGra OC 640:6).
May
15
comment Why do we avoid inviting people to a b'rit milah specifically, and not other celebrations too?
+1. This is a great question. You'd think the same reasoning would apply to a wedding feast, for example. This is based on P'sachim 113b, which mentions an opinion that people who avoid participating in a gathering for a mitzva feast are considered excommunicated by Heaven. Based on P'sachim 49a, Rashi (113b) and Tosafos (114a) give examples of such a mitzva feast: for a circumcision and for a wedding between a kohen and the daughter of a kohen (the latter e.g. was really only given to contrast with a case where the daughter of a kohen marries an 'am ha'aretz of the basest order).
May
15
comment Is it permitted to listen to Prank phone calls
I don't think deriving enjoyment from finding something humorous is technically prohibited as an issur hana'a, but I suppose there might be a different prohibition of moshav leitzim (joining a group of scoffers) or encouraging bad behavior or the like.
May
14
comment Magazine subscription that doesn't cancel
@Yishai If the worker is empowered to do that at his discretion, that's probably the same as if the owner did it himself.
May
14
comment Magazine subscription that doesn't cancel
Are you assuming the magazine is (1) aware that you are not paying, (2) unaware, or (3) are you unsure?
May
14
comment Intentionally mispronouncing lashon hakodesh in religious services
See Bava Basra 21a-b, for a story involving mispronouncing parshas 'Amalek.
May
14
comment Broken פ- What's wrong with it?
The M"B was citing the K'siva Tamma here. See also this blog post and accompanying comments.
May
14
comment How do I explain my heritage to my son? (as someone who has left Judaism at a young age)
There are also a lot of free classes out there for beginners.
May
14
comment Can a convert be a prophet?
@Shamiach Specifically on 90a: כגון חנניה בן עזור שמתחלתו נביא אמת ולבסוף נביא שקר.
May
14
comment Did Adam and Eve have bellybuttons, fingerprints or ridge over lip?
Avos D'Rabbi Nassan (31) might be interpreted to the contrary: אף כך הקדוש ברוך הוא... ברא את כל העולם כולו וברא את השמים ואת הארץ עליונים ותחתונים ויצר באדם כל מה שברא בעולמו... בורות בעולם בורות באדם זה טיבורו של אדם.
May
14
comment Were there particular reasons to vow the value of a person?
Tanchuma (B'chukosai 8): "The Holy One Blessed be He said to Israel: 'If you bring your valuation offerings before Me, I will consider it as if you brought your own souls before me.'" The Tanchuma there also contrasts arachin with the detestable human sacrifices of pagans.
May
14
comment What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
@Kordovero Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/29378.
May
14
comment What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
@DoubleAA There are also z'miros (with words) that don't quote p'sukim, and some of those z'miros probably can't count as Torah learning at all.
May
13
comment What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
@cham Of course, but it is possible that this would be allowed for shalom bayis or other considerations so long as לא קא מיכוין ליהנות. I totally disagree with you about saying that any heter would extend to allowing one to intend to focus on or enjoy the singing. Furthermore, the reason that special heter was required for hearing a woman sing is that erva prevents one from being allowed to learn Torah. If a person is not learning Torah (or praying or reciting sh'ma') at the time, a special heter for incidentally hearing a woman sing is unnecessary.
May
13
comment What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
@cham If by "they" you mean the Y'rei'im, et al., they didn't permit listening to non-Jewish women singing. They said that a person does not have to stop their Torah learning if they are within earshot. I suppose that's relevant to this question insofar as there is a difference between listening and hearing; if a mother-in-law singing z'miros is kol isha, there are more options besides either listening for enjoyment or fleeing the room in apparent terror (e.g. staying in the room for shalom bayis, but not focusing on or actively trying to listen to one's mother-in-law singing).
May
13
comment What to do if mother-in-law is singing at meal?
@Scimonster I wouldn't call it "no issue." At most, I would say there are some who permit.