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Jan
10
comment Halachic status of sleep paralysis
Seems to me that the wording of the gemara is necessary to fully describe a common scenario and is not subject to a diyuk of the type you are making. I understand how you could interpret the gemara both ways, but I think your answer would benefit if you found and included a source that agrees with your interpretation.
Jan
10
revised Hair coverings for unmarried women
added 114 characters in body
Jan
10
answered Hair coverings for unmarried women
Jan
10
comment Hair coverings for unmarried women
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/6068 . @MoshePeston That's related, but not quite a duplicate IMO.
Jan
10
comment Double head covering for women?
Even for men, that "inyan" appears to be essentially apocryphal. See this comment. Neither the Beit Yosef nor any pre-20th century source seems to suggest such an "inyan", and any appeals to such sources generally involve misreading them.
Jan
10
comment Halachic status of sleep paralysis
So you are classifying any type of total paralysis as sleep. If you're making that claim, you should either cite a direct source for it or cite a source that definitively supports the underlying principle that halachic sleep is characterized by lack of control over one's physical faculties. You're inferring this from the standard of דקרו ליה ועני ולא ידע לאהדורי סברא וכי מדכרו ליה מדכר, but it seems that, if anything, the gemara is measuring wakefulness by awareness rather than by control over one's physical faculties. In this case, speech is seemingly only used as an indicator of awareness.
Jan
9
comment Halachic status of sleep paralysis
Nice overview of נים ולא נים תיר ולא תיר, but just because sleep paralysis is different from נים ולא נים תיר ולא תיר does not mean that it's considered sleep. Seemingly, the standard for differentiating sleep from נים ולא נים תיר ולא תיר is that a certain degree of awareness is present in the latter. If so, sleep paralysis (or general paralysis for that matter) might also be considered wakefulness.
Jan
9
comment Interfaith Prayer Chapel
@Yarden See this question. However, it does not necessarily follow that poskim who permit praying in a mosque would permit praying in an interfaith chapel.
Jan
8
revised Why doesn't Yitzchak mention the knife?
you meant fire, right?
Jan
8
comment Baldness in Judaism
@ray I assume there's some spiritual significance to the fact that this is a mum, and the citation in B'choros seems a good place to start researching further. I understand this is not an answer as such, which is why I posted it as a comment.
Jan
8
comment Baldness in Judaism
See the mishna in B'choros (7:2) regarding the type of baldness that invalidates a kohein from service: הקירח, פסול. איזה הוא קירח, כל שאין לו שיטה של שיער מקפת מאוזן לאוזן; ואם יש לו, הרי זה כשר.
Jan
7
comment Is there any record of spousal abuse in the written or oral tradition?
@avi Shalom is correct; the Rambam is obviously referring to a court: ודבר זה כפי מה שיראה הדיין. (This is also evident in many other instances in Hil. Ishus where the word "kofin" is used). And there are lots of things for which a person could theoretically be disciplined by a court. That doesn't mean that agents of the court would go around surveilling people and breaking into their homes to administer punishment. But, under the right circumstances, a court was empowered to compel people to fulfill their obligations.
Jan
6
revised Speaking to a deceased person
deleted 20 characters in body
Jan
6
comment What's an elegant way to avoid social contact with untzinius or attractive women?
"... But Heaven forbid that a person should be like this, and this [character flaw] derives from batala (as is mentioned in K'suvos 59 regarding a woman, and the same is true for a man). And he must delve into Torah, and then he [eventually] won't have this [problem] at work."
Jan
6
comment What's an elegant way to avoid social contact with untzinius or attractive women?
@Shalom Regarding incidental contact on the subway, R' Moshe wrote (Igros Moshe, EH 2:14): "But if he knows that he will experience hirhur, he should avoid going then if it is not pressing for him to do so. But if he needs to go then for work, it should not be prohibited to him under the circumstances. And he should make efforts to redirect his thoughts, and to focus on Torah.... But if he knows that his nature is bad and that he will experience kishui eiver as a result, it is even forbidden for him to travel then for work purposes...
Jan
6
comment Is there sufficient evidence to support the theory that ancient Israel practiced monolatry?
@ESultanik As far as I know, מלבד cannot be translated as "above". It specifically means "aside from", and is related to the words לבד and בד which basically mean "alone". In any case, that word does not appear in Deut. 4:39, quoted above.
Jan
6
comment Is there any record of spousal abuse in the written or oral tradition?
To answer the question in your title (which doesn't specify physical abuse), there are several examples in the Talmud of rabbis' wives abusing their husbands (see for e.g. Y'vamos 63a,b).
Jan
6
comment Amen after hearing an identical blessing
Sort of related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/8258
Jan
6
answered Speaking to a deceased person
Jan
6
comment How do I repair a damaged friendship?
If you now have reason to trust the other person less, perhaps it would not be wise to continue a close relationship. Wholehearted forgiveness does not require you to expose yourself to risk by continuing to confide in or maintain a close relationship with an untrustworthy party. Judaism does not believe in "forgive and forget" insofar as "forget" means blinding oneself to potential future harm (and this is consistent with a more-than-superficial reading of the Rambam Hil. Dei'os 7:8).