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Feb
13
comment Siyum Mishnayos on Erev Pesach
Also, related comment‌​. R' Ovadia Yosef ruled that making a siyum on a masechta of mishnayos עם פירוש בהבנה is sufficient for Erev Pesach.
Feb
13
comment Siyum Mishnayos on Erev Pesach
Read the answers; they're more relevant than the question (though not quite answers to this question). As far making a siyum on a masechta of mishnayos, see the last Rashi on Shabbos 118b, who seems to imply that Abaye would make a Yom Tov for the rabbis when a scholar completed studying even the mishnayos of a masechta: דשלים מסכתיה שגרסה. The Maharshal (Yam Shel Sh'lomo, Bava Kama 7:37) discusses this gemara as the source for making a s'udas mitzva on finishing a masechta (see also Mishna B'rura 470:10, who just mentions maseches and doesn't specify gemara).
Feb
13
comment Siyum Mishnayos on Erev Pesach
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/17970 .
Feb
12
comment Recividism and teshuvah
@rabbi "May i report someone to the police 30 years after he committed a crime, in fear that based of the statistics of recidivism he still poses a danger?" A number of factors predict the likelihood of recidivism, including time since previous known offense and type of abuse. Before you ask a posek this question, you should probably speak to experts in the field so that you can pass on more information about the m'tzi'us to the posek.
Feb
12
comment Recividism and teshuvah
It appears you're asking about teshuva vis-a-vis an individual's status in society. This may not be relevant to cases involving mental illness, but see Sanhedrin (25b) regarding the standard for demonstrating sufficient repentance/rehabilitation to be a valid witness: ואימתי חזרתן משישברו את פיספסיהן ויחזרו בהן חזרה גמורה דאפילו בחנם לא עבדי.... Also, in support of @msh210 's point on teshuva and recidivism in general, see Mabit (Sha'ar T'shuva, ch. 6).
Jan
19
comment Is shooting rattlesnakes on a cattle range considered hunting?
@YEZ Correct, he forbids hunting on the grounds that it is dangerous. It's unclear whether this would extend to all cases of hunting, though.
Jan
19
comment Is there an aversion to having Gentiles in the synagoge and why?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/a/14223
Jan
19
comment Is there an aversion to having Gentiles in the synagoge and why?
I'm not sure your second paragraph answers the question.
Jan
19
comment Is there an aversion to having Gentiles in the synagoge and why?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/33684 and judaism.stackexchange.com/q/18995
Jan
17
comment Did Sadducees consider themselves Jewish?
+1 See Shabbos (152a) for a humorous exchange between R' Y'hoshua ben Karcha and a belligerent "Sadducee" (who could dish it out but couldn't take it). It sheds interesting light on early interfaith relations in Eretz Yisrael.
Jan
17
comment Is shooting rattlesnakes on a cattle range considered hunting?
Further, the "horrible thing" that the Noda Biyhuda refers to, namely being cruel by harming animals for fun, is not quite permissible. Although the action of killing animals isn't inherently forbidden by a particular statute, any action that demonstrates cruelty flies in the face of broad, overarching Biblical instructions such as והלכת בדרכיו. I think that's all he meant by "technically permissible".
Jan
17
comment Is shooting rattlesnakes on a cattle range considered hunting?
1.) Others disagree with the Noda Biyhuda and maintain that killing harmless animals in a painful manner is strictly prohibited as tza'ar ba'alei chayim. 2.) The Noda Biyhuda addresses the case of harmful snakes: נזדמנו נחשים הרגן בידוע שנזדמנו לו להרגן כו', אבל לרדוף אחריהם ביערות מקום מעונתן כשאין רגילין לבוא לישוב אין כאן מצוה ואין כאן רק לרדוף אחר תאות לבו ועצת הנדמה כטביא. Basically, you should kill snakes that potentially pose even a non-immediate threat, but you shouldn't go out to the middle of nowhere to kill (for sport) snakes that will almost certainly never pose any threat.
Jan
10
comment Family Event at non-kosher resturant
As a personal anecdote, I know someone who entered a non-kosher (but "kosher style") restaurant for the same reason as you describe in your question. A marginally religious woman who knew that he was religious spotted him there and exclaimed: "So you eat here, too!" His explanation that he wasn't actually eating there (and was only attending a family function) fell on deaf ears, and the woman took his presence as license for/validation of her practice of eating there.
Jan
10
comment Family Event at non-kosher resturant
Welcome to Mi Yodeya, and thanks for bringing your question here! For a definitive answer to your question, please consult your local Orthodox rabbi. As a matter of policy, Mi Yodeya does not offer rabbinic advice.
Jan
10
revised Family Event at non-kosher resturant
added tag
Jan
10
comment Parable of man visiting diamond-filled island
@Danno Candide retained his appreciation for gold and diamonds, and he left El Dorado with 50 animals laden with treasure. He just lost them due to a series of misfortunes.
Jan
10
comment Hair coverings for unmarried women
+1. Related to your answer (and to this question): judaism.stackexchange.com/q/16373
Jan
10
comment Hair coverings for unmarried women
For further discussion of this topic, see Women and the Mitzvot: The Modest Way, ch. 3, section IX, pp. 141-144.
Jan
10
revised Hair coverings for unmarried women
added 1 characters in body
Jan
10
comment Halachic status of sleep paralysis
Seems to me that the wording of the gemara is necessary to fully describe a common scenario and is not subject to a diyuk of the type you are making. I understand how you could interpret the gemara both ways, but I think your answer would benefit if you found and included a source that agrees with your interpretation.