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Jan
9
comment Rav Chaim Friedlander and Avos
@ChiddusheiTorah It's the first ma'amar in the Elul section of volume 1. The ma'mar is titled "Ein HaDavar Talui Ela Bi: The Repentance of Rabbi Elazar ben Durdaya". The subsection from which I excerpted is also titled Ein HaDavar Talui Ela Bi, and it starts on page ח of the main part of the book (which uses Hebrew pagination). I actually transcribed more in English in the answer than in Hebrew. The Hebrew excerpt above is only on p. ט of the Elul section, but my translation is from pages ט and י. Hope this helps.
Jan
8
comment “B'rachamav yaaseh shalom” - origin?
Background from here: "The specific formulation of this prayer appears in the Siddur of Rav Amram Gaon (9th century) as following all three prayers. This formulation is founded on the verse in Iyov (25:2): המשל ופחד עמו עושה שלום במרומיו." Note, only the first three words are based on the verse in Iyov. "Ya'aseh shalom" is likely based on Y'sha'ya 27:5 (יעשה שלום לי), and "v'al kol Yisra'el" is likely based on T'hillim (125:5 and 128:6, שלום על ישראל). The addition of "b'rachamav" interrupts none of these biblical allusions.
Jan
8
comment Should a non-Orthodox Jew wear tzitzit or not?
@DoubleAA And there's also Rashi's approach: דציצית בגימטריא ת"ר וה' קשרים וח' חוטין הרי תרי"ג. Gematria of tzitzis = 600, plus 5 knots per corner, plus 8 strings per corner (or what appears like 8 strings) = 613.
Jan
8
comment Should a non-Orthodox Jew wear tzitzit or not?
M'nachos 43b: ותניא אידך וראיתם אותו וזכרתם ועשיתם ראיה מביאה לידי זכירה זכירה מביאה לידי עשיה. "'And you shall see it and remember... and perform': Seeing leads to remembering, and remembering leads to performing."
Jan
8
comment Should a non-Orthodox Jew wear tzitzit or not?
@DoubleAA כנגד כל המצות כולן. But I guess you could read that as self-inclusive.
Jan
8
comment Should a non-Orthodox Jew wear tzitzit or not?
@DoubleAA That fits with M'nachos 43b that tzitzis is equivalent to the other 612 commandments: תניא אידך וראיתם אותו וזכרתם את כל מצות ה' כיון שנתחייב אדם במצוה זו נתחייב בכל מצות כולן... תניא אידך וראיתם אותו וזכרתם את כל מצות ה' שקולה מצוה זו כנגד כל המצות כולן. Also, it's 613 with the kolel.
Jan
8
comment Explanation of the midrash of the Donkey of moshe
@DoubleAA Are you refering to the gemara that talks about about the emendation in the Septuagint that changes "on the donkey" to "on the pack animals" (εκι τα ὑποζυγια, or על נושא בני אדם in the gemara's wording)?
Jan
8
comment Kasher a liver or unsalted meat
Slightly related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/43628
Jan
7
comment Did Jewish Men Always Have Beards Throughout History
@Matt Also Shabbos 152a ("הדרת פנים זקן") in the amusing story with R' Yehoshua ben Karcha and the heretic.
Jan
7
comment What is the source of the Birkat Habayit?
Maybe they are referring to the final stanza of Kipling's "A Carol"? "God bless the master of this house, and all who sleep therein! And guard the fens from pirate folk, and keep us all from sin..."
Jan
7
comment What is the source of the Birkat Habayit?
I hope it's not derived from the practice of Christians in central Europe who write an acronym for mansionem benedicat over their front door on January 6.
Jan
7
revised Elazar ben durdayah and the Metaphors
added 240 characters in body
Jan
7
comment Elazar ben durdayah and the Metaphors
@ChiddusheiTorah Hadrash V'ha'iyun is one possible transliteration.
Jan
7
revised Elazar ben durdayah and the Metaphors
added 51 characters in body
Jan
7
answered Elazar ben durdayah and the Metaphors
Jan
6
comment Am I liable to be stoned for my devotion to Hashem and the Jewish people?
The Hebrew expression is ואל יאמר בן הנכר הנלוה אל השם לאמר הבדל יבדילני השם מעל עמו, meaning: "Let not a child-of-a-foreigner who became attached to God say, 'God has surely separated me from upon His nation.'" This is a reference to a convert: 1. It says "child of a foreigner", not a foreigner. 2. The word "הנלוה" suggests conversion, per Y'sha'yahu 14:1. 3. The person is worried that "God separated me from upon His nation"; the Hebrew word meaning "from upon" suggests that the person had become a member of the Jewish people. 4. "Grasping my covenant" in verse 6 implies conversion.
Jan
6
comment Did Jewish Men Always Have Beards Throughout History
@Matt Scandalous! It's sounds like you have some good material for an answer yourself. If you write one up, feel free to incorporate some of the stuff in my comments towards the Tanach-era part of an answer, if you like.
Jan
6
comment Did Jewish Men Always Have Beards Throughout History
Also, Yosef was "shaved" before his encounter with Pharaoh, suggesting that he had a beard beforehand (B'reishis 41:14, unless this only means his hair was trimmed, such as is perhaps indicated by Onkelos - "וספר ושני כסותיה". See also Y'vamos 88a, "ואמר רב חסדא מלמד שיצא בלא חתימת זקן ובא בחתימת זקן").
Jan
6
comment Did Jewish Men Always Have Beards Throughout History
Some more examples: Vayikra 13:29 (as will some of the earlier examples, regarding tzara'as "leprosy"), Sh'mu'el II 19:25, and Sh'mu'el II 20:9. And Divrei HaYamim I 19:5 repeats the story with David's envoys.
Jan
6
comment Did Jewish Men Always Have Beards Throughout History
...Yirm'yahu (Yirm'yahu 41:5, 48:37), Y'chezkel (Y'chezkel 5:1), and Ezra (Ezra 9:3).