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Jan
11
comment What do the commentators say is the message/meaning behind the miracles?
@Aaron If you are asking about explanations for the plagues in general (on a macro level), it would be good to clarify that in the question. Otherwise, asking about what any commentators say about any or all of the individual plagues seems too broad.
Jan
11
comment Use tefillin without permission?
In any case, this question is about whether a person can assume that people in general will not be particular about him using their tallis or t'fillin. The question doesn't address whether those people are right or wrong, only that they have authority over the use of their own property.
Jan
11
comment Use tefillin without permission?
Chazal criticized kapdanus, i.e., being overly demanding, impatient, and harshly inflexible. This doesn't extend to being makpid about protecting one's property (despite the shared root word), though it may be praiseworthy to be more liberal in lending one's possessions; while the pious person says, "What's mine is yours, and what's yours is yours," the 'am ha'aretz says, "What's mine is yours, and what's yours is mine" (Avos 5:10). ("What's mine is mine and what's yours is yours" is only midas S'dom if the owner would agree that he's withholding property for absolutely no reason).
Jan
11
comment Use tefillin without permission?
Note that the Aruch HaShulchan is not comfortable with this leniency altogether, since (at least by his era) many people are uncomfortable with anyone wearing their garments at all, especially if the garment is new and clean. He also notes that previous poskim limited the case of borrowing a טלית to one that was not neatly folded, as that would be an additional indication that the owner is particular about the cleanliness of his טלית.
Jan
11
comment Use tefillin without permission?
@YaacovDeane The issue isn't what's objectively reasonable; the issue is what most people would object to. In most cases, eczema does not have any sort of contagious underlying cause. Further, the t'fillin probably will not get more grimy from that person than it would from anyone else borrowing the t'fillin (assuming the eczema is mild enough that the skin is not flaking or oozing at the time). However, many people would still be uncomfortable allowing someone with a visible skin condition to wear their t'fillin, and, for the purpose of this halacha, that's all that matters.
Jan
11
revised Use tefillin without permission?
added links
Jan
11
comment What is the black pin called that mourners wear?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/8229
Jan
11
comment What is the black pin called that mourners wear?
"The use of ribbons attached to clothing in order to avoid rending the actual garment is incorrect."
Jan
11
comment Why is Jeremiah 10:11 written in Aramaic?
At that time, many Jews still were not fluent in Aramaic. See, for another example, Daniyeil 1:4, where the king chose young Jewish men and had to instruct them in "ספר ולשון כשדים" (and see M'tzudas David on 2:4, who interprets "לשון כשדים" as referring to standard Aramaic; Ibn Ezra ad loc. appears to say likewise).
Jan
11
revised How to arrive at total Devekut HaMachshava
fixed broken link
Jan
11
comment Are two biological brothers allowed to marry two biological sisters?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/27757.
Jan
11
comment Why is talmud Yerushalmi in Aramaic
Are you simply assuming that they were able to speak Hebrew (and therefore should have made a point of writing it in Hebrew if they could have) or that they primarily spoke Hebrew (and therefore would naturally have written it in Hebrew)? Because the former is true but the latter is probably not.
Jan
11
comment Why is Jeremiah 10:11 written in Aramaic?
+1. The distinction between the two verses seems to be that HaShem is addressing Yirm'yahu in 25:27, while in 10:11 Yirm'yahu is addressing the Jewish people (who didn't all speak Aramaic very well, see Y'sha'ya 36:11) regarding how to say what they should say.
Jan
11
comment Is sarcasm a violation of the 9th commandment?
+1, though people should be careful in applying this sort of sarcasm as it may violate אונאת דברים in many cases. (Whether Rav Nachman b. Ushpezati was justified in this particular instance is another question).
Jan
11
comment Is sarcasm a violation of the 9th commandment?
I'm inclined to agree with @HaLeiVi; the previous category was people who always mix falsehood into their stories and statements ("They have implanted this evil so deeply within themselves that their words cannot leave their lips clean of falsehood"). This category is people who occasionally speak falsehood.
Jan
8
comment How much time should one spend on learning Torah a day
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/33416
Jan
8
comment Does casual sex establish a marriage?
The מגיד משנה understands the Rambam as Jake said. However, there are opinions (such as that of the Ra'avad) that disagree with the Rambam and say that a Jewish woman is only considered a קדשה when she makes herself available to any man. But if she only has monogamous relations with a particular man, as casual and short-lived as that relationship may be, the Ra'avad does not consider that to be a violation of קדשה. On the other hand, the Ra'avad holds that that woman becomes the man's pilegesh, and she may require a divorce. Otherwise, subsequent relations could be adultery.
Jan
8
awarded  Necromancer
Jan
8
awarded  Revival
Jan
8
comment Why was שמאי holding a ruler?
@user6591 This question?