11,471 reputation
11951
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 4 months
seen 7 hours ago

Jul
23
comment Impure baseball cap?
@user3979986 Glad to help. If the hat was well washed and has no stain or odor, I can't imagine any problem whatsoever. If it was well washed and there was no odor left, but there was some staining left behind, maybe it wouldn't be respectful attire while praying due to the requirement of hikon (based on Amos 4:12; see also Shabbos 10a). It is also generally inappropriate to go in public with stained clothes (Shabbos 114a). But there would still be no problem with praying or studying Torah in the presence of the hat, or handling the hat.
Jul
23
comment Married women uncovering their hair in the presence of gentiles
@DavidFeigen That is incorrect and rejected by the Talmud (B'rachos 25b): "אמר רב יהודה עכו"ם ערום אסור לקרות ק"ש כנגדו מאי איריא עכו"ם אפילו ישראל נמי ישראל פשיטא ליה דאסור אלא עכו"ם אצטריכא ליה מהו דתימא הואיל וכתיב בהו אשר בשר חמורים בשרם אימא כחמור בעלמא הוא קמ"ל דאינהו נמי איקרו ערוה דכתיב וערות אביהם לא ראו".
Jul
23
comment What is the correct response to “Chazaq u'Baruch!”?
בָּרוּך תִּהְיֶה might be more precisely transliterated as "baruch tihye" (/tʰihjɛ/), as there is a chirik-sh'va nach combination rather than a sh'va na'-chirik combination, and the hei ends the first syllable. Some people might not find it as easy or familiar to pronounce it that way, but hey :). (+1 for the content).
Jul
23
comment Respecting or using your father
I suspect that this would only apply to situations where (1.) the person knows (or knows of) your father, and (2.) the person is not required to help you. In the case of a worker at a store, it is likely that neither of these conditions would apply. Also, it may be that this halacha wouldn't apply where invoking one's father would seem inappropriate rather than respectful (e.g. "Please hire me for this job for my father's sake. wink, wink"), along the lines of some commentaries that say one should avoid mentioning one's father if it will cause גנאי.
Jul
23
comment Why might someone not be allowed to have a meat siyum during the nine days?
@DanF I think your second possibility (the guy is making a pseudo-siyum) is reasonably likely. (I had upvoted your independent comment about that, but it's gone now).
Jul
23
comment Why might someone not be allowed to have a meat siyum during the nine days?
@Shokhet If people are holding a conversation in public and over your head, I'd say they relinquished their right to complain when you chime in over a not-especially-personal halachic issue. And if Mr. A is already sharing information about his chavrusa with Mr. B., it seems kind of sanctimonious for him to assume the mantle of arbiter (on behalf of his chavrusa) over who can and can't participate in his very audible conversation. (I wasn't there, of course, and I don't know all the details of this specific case. Perhaps there's some way to judge the individuals here l'kaf z'chus).
Jul
23
comment Respecting or using your father
By the way, commentaries on the Shulchan Aruch indicate that the son should ask for a favor this way even if he knows that the person is going to do the favor only for the son's sake. This is because the son is showing respect for his father by suggesting that his father is more worthy of receiving the favor.
Jul
23
comment Respecting or using your father
1. I just meant the third person does the favor because he thinks the father is worthy (or at least the son shows deference to his father by suggesting that as the reason the third person should do the favor). 2. You're right; I just gave one example of how the son can express the idea. The main point is that the son shows respect by indicating that his father is deserving of the favor. 3. Any father should want to express hakaras hatov to someone who help's his child regardless of the reason for the favor. But the son is the main one who should show gratitude anyway - he received the favor.
Jul
23
comment Respecting or using your father
That was just an incidental remark. My point was that everyone involved understands that the son is the one benefiting from the favor. So if the other person really expects a favor in return, he will go to the son. This wouldn't necessarily have anything to do with who was being shown respect by the initial favor (or in the request for the initial favor).
Jul
23
comment Respecting or using your father
Option (1): "Please do me a favor out of respect for my great father. I may not be worthy of the favor myself, but please do me this favor for my father's sake." Option (2): "Please do me this favor. Perhaps you wouldn't do this for just anybody, but do it for my sake." If they will do the favor for you in either case, you should choose Option (1) since it demonstrates the esteem you have for your father, and it suggests that the other person also esteems your father. (Is this clear?)
Jul
23
comment Respecting or using your father
The son isn't asking for a favor in the context of a quid pro quo. The assumption is that the favor is being granted out of respect. If the son mentions his father, he is implying that his father is worthy of respect. If any reciprocity was expected, it would be from the son anyway.
Jul
22
comment Why would someone recite Kaddish D'Rabbanan but not Kaddish Yatom?
Are you asking why someone who isn't a mourner would try to avoid kaddish yasom but not kaddish d'rabbanan?
Jul
22
revised Does a minor's siyum allow one to eat meat in the nine days?
fixed my sp.
Jul
22
revised Does a minor's siyum allow one to eat meat in the nine days?
Added fn. about explaining the Rambam; @msh210 - if this is not to your liking, feel free to edit or remove as you see fit.
Jul
22
comment Praying in a mosque that used to be a church?
This potentially useful article about whether a church can be converted into a synagogue might be a starting point to answering whether a church converted into a mosque no longer has the status of a church.
Jul
22
revised Does a minor's siyum allow one to eat meat in the nine days?
link
Jul
21
revised Is there sufficient evidence to support the theory that ancient Israel practiced monolatry?
added examples
Jul
21
comment Feeling compassion for re'shaim and the mitzvah to hate
Regarding different levels w.r.t. hatred, this might be implied in Chafetz Chayim (B'eir Mayim Chayim, Hil. Lashon Hara' 8:10, which suggests a stronger hatred than the standard case of an avaryan; see also Hil. Lashon Hara' 4:3-7, 8:4-8, as well as some scattered halachos in ch. 7 and 10).
Jul
21
comment Feeling compassion for re'shaim and the mitzvah to hate
I think it is a false dichotomy to say one cannot love someone or feel compassion for them while completely hating them, since those emotions are not strictly opposite. I recall that there is a case to be made that Avraham both loved and hated Yishma'el simultaneously, but I can't think of sources off the top of my head. (Note, though, that there are places in the Torah that specifically indicate that one should not have compassion for someone, e.g. a meisis).
Jul
21
comment Feeling compassion for re'shaim and the mitzvah to hate
I seem to recall that the reason given by Tosafos was that (based on the verse in Mishlei you cited) third parties may sense and mirror your hatred of the person, even though you are the only one who has halachic justification to hate him (because you alone observed him sinning and, presumably, he was dismissive of your entreaties that he mend his ways). It could be that the tempered hatred approach does not apply to a wicked non-Jew or to a Jew who is well established to be wicked (e.g. as in T'hillim 139:21-22 cited in the OP). Anyway, +1.