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Jan
5
comment Testing Hashem (for Monetary Gain)
@NBZ I don't think YeZ was trying to answer that part of the question. I think he was answering the question of "How could the otherwise observant son do this?"
Jan
5
comment What was the value of the Rishonim's philosophical inquiries about God and the world?
The Rambam (Hil. Y'sodei HaTorah 1:6,7) seems to indicate that a person should use whatever means are at his disposal to fulfill the mitzvos of knowing and understanding that HaShem is the Creator of the world and that no other gods exist, and understanding HaShem's unity and incorporeality.
Jan
5
comment What sort of challenges can one expect to see after choosing to become a full time learner if starting out later in life?
@Matt Weathering.
Jan
5
revised What sort of challenges can one expect to see after choosing to become a full time learner if starting out later in life?
this seems like a how-to question - feel free to revert if it isn't
Jan
5
comment What sort of challenges can one expect to see after choosing to become a full time learner if starting out later in life?
Rabbi Akiva was 40 years old and never learned Torah. Once he saw a rock with a hole carved into it by water dripping on it daily. He said, "If something soft can penetrate something hard, surely Torah, which is hard as iron, can penetrate a heart of flesh and blood." He immediately went to study Torah with his son in a class for schoolchildren. He began by learning the alphabet, and after 13 years he was teaching Torah to the masses. (Avos d'Rabbi Nassan 6:2)
Jan
5
comment Source for statement that we don't know how to rebuke today
@Yishai Source: Chazon Ish YD 2:28. He says that we have to treat wrongdoers and heretics as unrebuked people who operate out of ones, since nowadays we are incapable of providing sufficiently proper rebuke to change their status. (This is not to say a person shouldn't try to correct his fellow, but if the wrongdoer continues in his ways he is still considered unrebuked).
Jan
5
comment What are the origins of the תושלב"ע prayer at the end of holy books?
Both variants are common, and there are also other variants. This was in wide use from at least the time of the rishonim (e.g. Rambam, Ibn Ezra, and the Tashbetz).
Jan
5
answered The Alshich HaKodosh and temporal
Jan
5
comment “May God make you like Ephraim and like Manasseh” — in what way?
Fair enough. But notice in yydl's meta answer: "If you think exact copy-pasting will work, it might be a good idea to reanalyze why the two questions are not duplicates." Anyway, I prefer the phrasing in your question, and, if anything, I'd rather migrate those other answers here.
Jan
5
comment Rav Chaim Friedlander and Avos
@YeZ Actually, it's not a complete translation of the discourse - just a partial one. But it is a complete translation of the Hebrew excerpt I included (that can also be found in source #16 in this source sheet compiled by Rabbi Moshe Tzvi Weinberg.
Jan
5
comment Rav Chaim Friedlander and Avos
@YeZ Yeah, it's my extemporaneous translation. Feel free to brush it up if it needs fixing.
Jan
5
answered Rav Chaim Friedlander and Avos
Jan
5
comment “May God make you like Ephraim and like Manasseh” — in what way?
@msh210 Perhaps you are right. That's an interesting (and I think plausible) explanation of the Maharal - not necessarily that the children get invoked for blessings (though that would be great), but that they, too, become important people.
Jan
5
comment “May God make you like Ephraim and like Manasseh” — in what way?
But, practically speaking, the answer to your question is the be all and end all to answering the other question - at least with respect to the existing answers on the other question.
Jan
5
comment “May God make you like Ephraim and like Manasseh” — in what way?
Do you think there is a significant distinction between why "Hashem made it so that we get blessed like them" and what Ya'akov's intention was? If so, perhaps you can spell out why you think so in your question.
Jan
5
comment “May God make you like Ephraim and like Manasseh” — in what way?
Is that first one a duplicate?
Jan
5
answered “May God make you like Ephraim and like Manasseh” — in what way?
Jan
5
reviewed Approve On Shabbat, if one can't sleep, may one consume valerian tea? Valerian root powder? Other non-prescription remedies?
Jan
4
revised Sefas Emes and your mission
whoops, I neglected to include the primary link
Jan
4
comment How and when did fedoras arise as acceptable headwear?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/40533 and judaism.stackexchange.com/q/12659