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seen Apr 14 at 3:20

Apr
16
comment Rabbi Soloveitchik's wife and hair coverings
... That's not to say those gedolim approved, but you can't exactly force your wife to cover her hair (and even if you could if would probably not be wise to try).
Apr
16
comment Rabbi Soloveitchik's wife and hair coverings
@Yehoshua Aruch Hashulchan (75:7): ועתה בואו ונצווח על פרצות דורינו בעוונותינו הרבים שזה שנים רבות שנפרצו בנות ישראל בעון זה והולכות בגילוי הראש וכל מה שצעקו על זה הוא לא לעזר ולא להועיל ועתה פשתה המספחת שהנשואות הולכות בשערותן כמו הבתולות אוי לנו שעלתה בימינו כך. So at least in mid/late-19th century Belarus and Lithuania, this was rampant. If anything, hair covering was even less commonly observed in the US in the early and mid-20th century, and, at least up until sometime during the mid-20th century, the wives of several gedolim did not cover their hair (including R' Soloveitchik's wife).
Apr
16
comment Playing with a pet on Shabbos
I'm not saying you're wrong, just that I heard someone say that. I haven't looked at it in a long time, but isn't the part about "except for pets" in brackets or something, implying it was not in the original language of the t'shuva?
Apr
16
comment Playing with a pet on Shabbos
See especially Rabbi Shmuel David's thorough responsum cited in Rabbi Jachter's article.
Apr
16
comment Playing with a pet on Shabbos
I heard that that t'shuva was emended by someone other than R' Moshe, and that R' Moshe himself did not mention an exception for pets.
Apr
12
comment 100% Polyester or Silk suits requiring checking
You could also ask, as a precursor to this question, whether you can establish a safeik of shaatnez to begin with (i.e. if you can establish that there is sometimes wool and linen in those kinds of suits). If not, there's no need for a ספק ספיקא. At the other extreme (for example), if there generally is linen in the lining, and wool is sometimes mixed in, that might be considered a single safeik (just from the wool) if you can establish a chazaka that linen is in those suits.
Apr
11
comment Shiur of “Miut Hamatzui”
@Yehoshua The generally cited mekor is the Mishk'nos Ya'akov (Vol. 1, YD § 17).
Apr
9
comment Relations with messianists
@Danield R' Ahron followed up with a letter saying his signature was appended to a letter that he did not write and did not agree with. See DoubleAA's earlier comments. He did not agree with the notion, stated in the letter, that legitimate sources support a resurrected person being moshiach.
Apr
9
comment Relations with messianists
@Danield - But couldn't someone who thinks the Rebbe will (likely) be the moshiach be considered an "anti-meshichist"? My understanding is that an "anti-meshichist" is just someone who believes that the Rebbe didn't want Lubavitchers to make the issue of his messiah-ship a primary and public issue.
Apr
9
comment Relations with messianists
... In fact, R' Ahron had previously implied (in 1994) that the very reason he did not consider Lubavitchers heretics was because he thought "the overwhelming majority" of them did not subscribe to the view that "the Rebbe will be resurrected as the Messiah" (which, though you can argue about nuance and semantics, is essentially incorrect and would nowadays be naive).
Apr
9
comment Relations with messianists
-1 I downvoted exactly on the basis of the above comment by @DoubleAA - the letter produced above is a borderline forgery. This letter was written by a Lubavitcher without R' Ahron's knowledge or consent, and use of the letter is disingenuous, even mendacious. All R' Ahron knew was that they were going to sign his name to a letter saying that he held that Lubavitchers with that belief are not heretics.
Apr
9
comment Eating Matzah of Tevel or Heqdesh
@DoubleAA Yes, but in the case of tevel at least, Rashi interprets the gemara as saying (incidentally to the point you mentioned) that the mishna only meant to say it is assur, not that you are literally not yotzei.
Apr
9
comment Relations with messianists
@Ariel "No one believes the Lubavitcher Rebbe is the Mashiach." That depends on what the meaning of the word is is.
Apr
9
comment How to handle cadavers
related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/10976 and judaism.stackexchange.com/q/5104
Apr
9
comment Eating Matzah of Tevel or Heqdesh
See P'sachim 35b, which explains that the tevel referred to in the mishna is tevel mid'rabbanan (e.g. from an atzitz she'eino nakuv), from which one is yotzei b'di'avad (see Rashi 35b, s.v. t'vul mid'rabbanan). The hekdesh referred to is hekdesh that was redeemed al gabei karaka, which I guess perhaps R' Ovadia miBartenura holds is not fully hekdesh. Alternatively, maybe he used the expression "shel tevel oh shel hekdesh" but only meant referring to "shel tevel".
Apr
9
comment What is mainstream Chabad's view on Elokists?
@Daniel A disciple of his once came to town collecting for his organization, and a local (mainstream) Chabad rav encouraged his congregants to donate. Either the rav didn't consider it a problem, or he was ignorant of the fact that it is an idolatrous organization (in which case he was being seriously negligent in promoting that organization).
Apr
8
comment What is mainstream Chabad's view on Elokists?
There is also another subgroup that would not call the Rebbe "Elokeinu" or the like, but at the same time redefine the expression "עצמות ומהות מלובש בגוף" to justify specifically davening facing a picture of the Rebbe (my brother personally witnessed this in a main minyan at K'far Chabad years ago), and refer to the Rebbe as "kol yachol" literally, referring to a type of omnipotence beyond the standard "tzadik gozeir v'HKBH mekayeim." Would such people be halachically distinguished from those few who explicitly refer to the Rebbe as "Elokeinu"?
Apr
8
comment What is mainstream Chabad's view on Elokists?
@DoubleAA - Such an answer would also do well to define the beliefs of "official" and "official meshichist" vis-à-vis the status of the Rebbe (e.g. don't even most non-meshichists consider that the Rebbe is/will be/likely is/likely will be be b'chezkas Moshiach or Moshiach?) and it's ramifications for practical conduct (e.g. reciting Yechi after davening, wearing Yechi yarmulkes). This way, people know what groups are being referenced. Such an answer should also to justify the claim that "non-meshichists" are "offcial" (there has been a great deal of vying for "official" status in the past).
Apr
8
comment Rabbi Akiva's 24k students died because of interpersonal issues, but he said Veahavta Lireacha Kamocha is a Klal Gadol?
That conclusion would be an answer; perhaps you should edit it in explicitly.
Apr
8
comment Rabbi Akiva's 24k students died because of interpersonal issues, but he said Veahavta Lireacha Kamocha is a Klal Gadol?
I'm not certain that this answers the question, which seems to ask for an explanation of why R' Akiva's students apparently did not adequately absorb the central teaching above, despite their differences.