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Jan
21
comment Neder not specified
Also please specify what you mean by "kind of potatoes." What kind of potatoes did you mean to include in, or exclude from, the vow?
Jan
21
comment Neder not specified
This case is not necessarily so cut and dried (see comments on the answer below). Please CYLOR for a practical halachic ruling.
Jan
21
comment What is the source of the words of the Hebrew folksong “Hevenu Shalom Aleichem”?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/2405 (consider cross-posting this answer there, too). By the way, "we smoke" in German is "wir rauchen," which matches the number of syllables in "heiveinu."
Jan
21
comment Neder not specified
When people say "potato," they usually have in mind a category that may include a wide variety of potato cultivars. I was thinking along the lines of someone who made an oath about "potatoes" but only meant to prohibit Russet potatoes. I suspect that Yukon Gold potatoes and Désirée potatoes, for example, would still be prohibited to him. Although Ipomoea roots are commonly referred to as "sweet potatoes," I don't think people typically mean to include that in the category of potato when they speak, so I'd suppose that there would be no problem there.
Jan
21
comment Kibud av VS midas hasidus what wins
Are you saying that continuing to give a shi'ur in the manner that you want takes precedence over your father's wishes? I'm not sure how clearly this supports your conclusion that "extra steiging trumps kibbud av" or even answers the OP's question about weighing stringencies against kibbud av. Also, where did you see or hear this story that you summarized in your answer? If you help other readers find your source, they can check the details of this story to see if it seems to support your conclusion or answer the OP's question.
Jan
21
comment If a food product has a heretical/idol worship image on it, and a hechsher as well, may one partake of it?
@TzafnasPaneach Interesting. At the same time, the OU certifies Chicken of the Sea tuna and salmon despite the somewhat immodest mermaid logo that features prominently on the label (albeit that it is a not-quite-photo-realistic drawing - related questions here and here).
Jan
21
comment Neder not specified
In fact, I'm not even sure it would work on barley bread nowadays; see Ba'eir Heiteiv YD 217:6, who cites the Maharshal that it depends on common contemporary usage. I'm not sure that barley bread is "stam" bread anymore.
Jan
21
comment Neder not specified
Per the rationale of the Shach you cited (210:2), this may only work in the case of wheat bread or barley bread since those are the most typical types of bread that people mean when they say "bread." It is therefore reasonable to expect that someone may have specifically meant "wheat bread" or "barley bread" when they said "bread" (see Shulchan 'Aruch YD 217:10). I'm not at all sure the circumstances with potatoes are analogous nowadays.
Jan
21
comment Kibud av VS midas hasidus what wins
Are you talking about a case where the son had already accepted the stringency upon himself before the father demanded that the son accept the gift? If so, that might introduce another factor, namely the need for hataras n'darim before following his father's wishes.
Jan
21
comment Where would a mezuzah go on a completely round doorway?
Based on DoubleAA's edit, your answer is now incomplete. If this is merely "there are those who would say," and if R' Ya'akov Emden's opinion is not necessarily halacha p'suka, then where would the (implied) other opinions say to place the m'zuza? If your answer is meant to definitively say that a round doorway does not require a m'zuza, you should rollback the previous edit and preferably explain in a bit more detail how you know this is halacha p'suka.
Jan
21
comment Shemot (Exodus) 17:4 - Why does Moses think that the people will stone him?
Pertinent verse: B'midbar 14:10.
Jan
21
comment If a food product has a heretical/idol worship image on it, and a hechsher as well, may one partake of it?
In other words, does the product label promote Christianity, or does the food itself contain symbols that are, incidentally, often associated with Christianity? Or is it the worst of both worlds, where the food itself includes symbols that overtly and directly relate to Christianity? Or, even worse, does the food itself contain an image of a person/thing that is the direct object of idolatrous worship? Or, worse yet, is the food itself shaped 3-dimensionally (or in high relief) in the form of the object of idolatrous worship. These are all different cases, so it is important to clarify.
Jan
21
comment If a food product has a heretical/idol worship image on it, and a hechsher as well, may one partake of it?
Please clarify: Are you talking about foods like Bragg Apple Cider Vingegar, where the label includes the Christian fish symbol and a verse from the New Testament? Or are you talking about foods like Pepperidge Farm Chessmen Cookies, where crosses are baked into the cookies in bas-relief, but the product has no overt connection to Christianity aside from depicting chess pieces?...
Jan
21
comment Can one have a favorite pasuk/parsha/masechta?
in order to be mekayem the mitzva of ve'ahavta le'reachah ke'mochah I read R' Yona on Avos 1:6 as simply saying one must treat his friend with ahava for the sake of maintaining the friendship. Does he say more elsewhere? | a person should make 'friends' with one mesechta This appears to be based on Rashi on Avos 1:6, who mentions that some say that "acquire a friend for yourself" refers to s'farim ("וקנה לך חבר אמרי לה ספרים"). Do you have a precise source who interprets this as befriending a single tractate to help understand and appreciate other tractates?
Jan
21
comment Can one have a favorite pasuk/parsha/masechta?
This is a quote from the Chafetz Chayim's Toras HaBayis (fn. to 6:5), quoting the M'noras HaMa'or who relates this story in the name of the Tanchuma. (Our editions of the Tanchuma do not have this story, however). The concluding sentence of this story (missing from the Chafetz Chayim's excerpt) indicates that it is preferable to study and focus on more than one masechta: "והלא דברים קל וחומר ומה חסיד זה שלא למד אלא מסכתא אחת בלבד כך הלמד תורה הרבה ותלמוד הרבה ומעמיד תלמידים הרבה על אחת כמה וכמה".
Jan
21
comment Pirating software that has already been bought
@YaacovDeane ... particularly (from the halachic side of it) since we can assume that the seller would not want the exchange reversed in case of violation of those unreasonable restrictions.
Jan
21
comment Pirating software that has already been bought
@YaacovDeane My first comment was about Jewish law, in which case, assuming the condition was valid, the exchange would be void and subject to reversal if the buyer violated it (assuming no prior written permission). | I'm not so certain that the seller would have cause for action if the buyer violated that condition by making himself a duplicate. See the precedents cited in my second comment. | Afterthought: Unreasonable restrictions imposed by the seller en masse in EULA "contracts," in which the buyer has no say but "yes" or "no," may have no legal or halachic significance...
Jan
21
comment Pirating software that has already been bought
As far as dina d'malchusa dina, that may very well also not apply to these conditions; see SoftMan Products Co. v. Adobe Systems Inc. and Step-Saver Data Systems, Inc. v. Wyse Technology, which suggest that these sort of conditions may not be legally valid.
Jan
21
comment Pirating software that has already been bought
Regarding making a personal duplicate copy contrary to conditions expressed by the seller, the Chazon Ish (EH 73:18) indicates that conditions of sale that merely control how the buyer can use the property are invalid ("ופטומי מילי נינהו"). See also Emek HaMishpat (4:37-38) who argues that "do not reproduce" conditions are invalid since the seller does not intend to carry out its halachic responsibilities in case the buyer violates the condition.
Jan
21
comment Can one have a favorite pasuk/parsha/masechta?
+1. Even the strict opinions would not seem to have any problem if someone was careful to use phrasing that could not be taken to imply that other parts of Torah are not nice. E.g. "I particularly enjoyed learning this sugya," or, "This pasuk resonates with me especially much."