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Apr
28
revised Is getting angry a biblical prohibition
edited per comments
Apr
28
comment Is getting angry a biblical prohibition
Ok, so you just want to know if getting angry violates a d'oraisa, and if so what pasuk is this d'oraisa based on? That is more in line with your title and more understandable. I edited the question accordingly and retracted my close vote.
Apr
28
comment Live Vs. Recorded Music during the Omer
@SimchasTorah See the Halachipedia article for a discussion of talmudic and halachic sources on the matter of listening to music year-round.
Apr
27
comment Onkelos, Anthropomorphism, and The Exodus
@BabySeal True, it's not quite the same as Rashi's case. As Jewels pointed out, expressions like "strong hand" are directly translated by Onkelos, while any reference specifically to "HaShem's hand" or the like is explained metaphorically. Still, the distinction itself is noteworthy. Perhaps Onkelos considered "yad chazaka" and "chozek yad" and such to be well known idioms requiring no explanation.
Apr
27
comment Do We Repeat the Prayers for Using the Restroom and Washing the Hands After Each Time?
Somewhat related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/9760 and judaism.stackexchange.com/q/1173
Apr
27
comment Do We Repeat the Prayers for Using the Restroom and Washing the Hands After Each Time?
After each use of the restroom, you should wash and then recite Asher Yatzar. However, you do not recite the blessing Al N'tilas Yadayim after each hand-washing.
Apr
27
comment Waking up in the middle of the night
@DoubleAA In fact, intelligently splitting the infinitive could clarify the sentence. As it is, the confusing arrangement of prepositional phrases could lead someone to wrongly interpret this sentence as: "Any time you are going to say Asher Yatzar after using the restroom, you should remember to wash your hands at some subsequent point."
Apr
27
comment Sefira Counting in Diaspora
@DoubleAA Perhaps because the very essence of Shavuos is that it comes after 49 days of the omer.
Apr
27
comment Onkelos, Anthropomorphism, and The Exodus
@BabySeal Read the answers. In this particular case, they apply just as well to Onkelos. The point is that he is still anthropomorphzing, but retaining this terminology serves to signal what the metaphor is.
Apr
27
comment Onkelos, Anthropomorphism, and The Exodus
Highly related (and the answers there may essentially answer this question, too): judaism.stackexchange.com/q/33577
Apr
27
comment Shaving in Honor of Shabbos During Sefirah
@user4784 See Mishna B'rura (551:32) and Bi'ur Halacha (ibid. s.v. וכן לכבוד שבת) regarding haircuts. Perhaps you can draw an inference from there that shaving is permitted if normally done on a weekly basis.
Apr
27
comment Tosafoth's unique opinion that Building is biblically allowed on Yom Tov, contradicted by a simple Gemara in Beitzah?
@SethJ See Tosafos (K'suvos 60a, s.v. ממעכן), who writes that mar'is ayin applies only in public for d'rabbanans, but even in private for d'oraysas. (Incidentally, the citation for the Shach should be 87:6).
Apr
27
comment Tosafoth's unique opinion that Building is biblically allowed on Yom Tov, contradicted by a simple Gemara in Beitzah?
@SethJ s.v. v'harodeh: תימה לר"י כיון דמותר לגבן בי"ט מן התורה אפילו באפשר אפילו לא יהא מותר מדרבנן אלא בדלא אפשר אם כן נפל ביתו בי"ט יהא מותר לבנותו בי"ט דמתוך שהותר בנין לצורך דמגבן הוי משום בונה כדאמר בסמוך הותר נמי שלא לצורך ובלבד שיהא צורך היום לאכול בתוכו שלא יכנו שרב ושמש וי"ל דאסור מדרבנן דהוי עובדא דחול כי היכי דאסורין טחינה והרקדה ביו"ט
Apr
27
comment Why is “Av haRachamim” said every Shabbat?
A reasonable conjecture. Tach v'Tat, which heavily affected Polish Jews, is linked with the Rhineland massacres of 1096 in one nusach of א-ל מלא רחמים even though the original prayer predates Tach v'Tat. Perhaps Tach v'Tat likewise compounded the importance of Av HaRamchamim for Polish Jews.
Apr
27
comment How did Talmudic rabbis know about others' personal matters
@BabySeal In fact, that word is used in other contexts to specifically refer to an arm. In the context, this interpretation also makes sense, as the gemara is discussing that these rabbis were overweight.
Apr
27
comment Shaving in Honor of Shabbos During Sefirah
See here and here for discussion of this question.
Apr
25
comment Looking for Source for explanation in Chafetz Chaim
@Zvi There is a vast number of different kinds of diyukim made and explanations given surrounding the text here. Since you bring it up, though, you are talking about the Ibn Ezra's critique of the Rashbam discussed in this question (see also this article and the addendum to this article that translates the Ibn Ezra's comments about his dream).
Apr
25
comment What's the difference between אֱדַיִן and בֵּאדַיִן?
To give the quote from Jastrow: "אדין - at that time, thereupon... באדין - at the same time, forthwith."
Apr
24
comment At what cost must one perform a mitzvah?
@DoubleAA Most likely, the KH would say that R' Yehuda bar Il'ai reacted to his unpleasant experience in a similar manner. As the Yerushalmi mentions, R' Yudah permitted diluted wine, while R' Yonah permitted m'vushal. A discussion on the halachic differences between mazug and m'vushal is interesting in and of itself, but perhaps one approach to the difference between the earlier ruling of R' Yudah permitting mazug and the later ruling of R' Yonah permitting m'vushal is that m'vushal may have simply been an uncommon form of wine back in R' Yudah's time (see Rosh Avoda Zara 2:13).
Apr
24
awarded  Nice Answer