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May
12
revised Angel in the womb for women?
added 15 characters in body
May
12
comment Angel in the womb for women?
Much of your answer has bearing on this question. Should this answer perhaps be cross-posted?
May
12
answered Angel in the womb for women?
May
12
comment Are there any types of questions that Eliyahu (Elijah) cannot answer?
@Yoni Ah, yes. I may have skimmed your answer a bit too quickly. Good on you.
May
12
comment Angel in the womb for women?
@preferred Chayei Olam, ch. 12.
May
12
comment Do Amalekians not have souls?
Yes, free will is necessary for sin. I'm not aware of a source indicating that they have no soul, though some kabbalistic books indicate that their souls are rooted in evil. They can still choose to change themselves for the better (at least according to some opinions), but this requires a transformation from the default. (Incidentally, this is different from the Christian notion of guilt via original sin. Amalek has an evil nature by default, but this does not make them guilty if they have never done anything wrong. Still, evil needs to be destroyed due to the spiritual danger it presents).
May
12
comment Do Amalekians not have souls?
Is your third question asking if they could pass a Turing test? Because I very much doubt you'll find a Jewish source answering that in the negative (likewise regarding your second question as to if they can feel pain). As far as your question about free will, see this question, which implies that they have free will.
May
12
comment Are there any types of questions that Eliyahu (Elijah) cannot answer?
...Also, the Mabit indicates that Eliyahu's exceptional knowledge includes esoteric matters of "the upper world": הוא מוכן לדעת כל הדברים העליונים המתחדשים בעולם העליון, מצד דקות נפשו, וידיעת כל הדברים ההוים בעוה"ז מצד זכות גופו. Anyway, nice answer +1.
May
12
comment Are there any types of questions that Eliyahu (Elijah) cannot answer?
Well, I wouldn't go so far as calling it "a common misconception." The Mabit (Sha'ar HaY'sdos §60) mentioned it as an acronym for תשבי יתרץ קושיות והויות, though he likely meant this only derech remez.
May
12
comment Are there any types of questions that Eliyahu (Elijah) cannot answer?
While I think your answer is fundamentally correct, it would benefit from more thorough sourcing. +1.
May
12
comment Are there any types of questions that Eliyahu (Elijah) cannot answer?
@DanF It wasn't meant as an answer to your question; it's just a comment on the popular acronym. Your point about Eliyahu answering questions is still valid. Anyway, תשבי יתרץ קושיות ואבעיות means "the Tishbite (Eliyahu) will answer difficulties and queries," and תהא קאי means "let it stand" (as mentioned by DoubleAA).
May
12
comment Are there any types of questions that Eliyahu (Elijah) cannot answer?
R' Yom Tov Lipmann Heller writes that, although teiku is popularly known as an acronym for תשבי יתרץ קושיות ואבעיות, it is actually a portmanteau meaning תהא קאי (Tosafos Yom Tov on Eiduyos 8:7).
May
12
answered Is the metamorphosis of a caterpillar into a butterfly mentioned anywhere in Rabbinic literature?
May
12
comment Is the metamorphosis of a caterpillar into a butterfly mentioned anywhere in Rabbinic literature?
@msh210 I guess so, but I would feel more comfortable in posting an answer if I was prepared to include an analysis of traditional understandings of the עש/סס/אבזקא/דרנא, as well as a halachic discussion of the status of a caterpillar (whether it is considered sheretz ha'of and/or whether the status should be dependent on the fact that it has a flying form at a later stage). Oh well, I'll post it as is for now and hopefully someone will come along with a more thorough answer at some point.
May
12
comment Should a chazan who missed a day count the omer with a b'racha?
Not a complete answer to your question, but the Chida discusses a controversy regarding whether someone who missed a day may serve as שליח ציבור and recite the blessing (Birkei Yoseif OC 124, paragraph beginning עוד). He concludes in accordance with the P'ri Chadash (OC 489:8, paragraph beginning נשאלתי) that the person may not recite the blessing.
May
12
revised Who wrote Chaar Hatsioun?
Fixed transliteration to *tzeirei*: bi'ur --> bei'ur. Thanks, @DoubleAA!
May
12
comment Who wrote Chaar Hatsioun?
@DoubleAA True. Thanks for the explication.
May
12
comment Who wrote Chaar Hatsioun?
@ShimonbM Actually, regarding transliteration, see the footnote on my answer below. Thanks for bringing up that sefer.
May
12
answered Who wrote Chaar Hatsioun?
May
12
comment Who wrote Chaar Hatsioun?
@ShimonbM Also, that's essentially a reference book, while the one by the Chafetz Chaim at least sometimes discusses halacha and is associated with a halachic work.