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Jun
4
comment Can one cite divrei torah in the name of a rabbi who has gone astray?
@wfb R' Moshe explicitly said that he thought Carlebach was not a מומר לתיאבון. I'm not totally certain that R' Moshe would say there is a problem with a מומר לתיאבון, but I get the sense that he would since he mentions the problem of הנחת שם למעשה רשעים, which includes more than the base case of מינים ואפיקורסים.
Jun
4
revised Naming after bad people
added 189 characters in body
Jun
4
comment Can one cite divrei torah in the name of a rabbi who has gone astray?
@wfb I think it may depend on the particulars of the case. The extent of what R' Moshe thought Shlomo Carlebach was doing (holding mixed events) would be considered benign compared to what some recent "fallen rabbis" have been accused of. R' Moshe might have categorized some of those rabbis as in the group of מומר לתיאבון, in which case the distinction regarding when "he began his sinful behavior" may come into play.
Jun
4
comment Can one cite divrei torah in the name of a rabbi who has gone astray?
See Igros Moshe (EH 1:96), which discusses a similar topic and makes the same distinction as R' Schachter.
Jun
4
comment Does one make a Bracha when seeing the Pope?
@Yishai I guess that's possible, but I'm more inclined to think that that case may be different because her primary and most distinctive role is not that of a religious leader. Further, I don't think she usually wears conspicuous symbols of her religion. So reciting the blessing wouldn't carry the appearance of reciting a blessing over someone in their role as leader of a foreign religion.
Jun
3
comment When did the custom of using 2 people for hagbah and gelilah begin?
DanF: @DoubleAA is correct; גלילה in the Talmud includes both גלילה and הגבהה (see MB 147:5, see also Rama OC 147:4 and Magein Avraham 147:11).
May
31
answered Torah atones for all sins
May
15
comment Must one pray with a minyan?
My understanding has been that if a minyan is meeting within "one mil" of you, you are required to attend. Otherwise, you should still try to attend, but it is not a formal obligation. I'm not sure that mil in this context is literally meant as a measure of distance. Instead, it may mean k'dei hiluch mil (i.e. approximately 18 minutes away by whatever means of transport is available). Also, if you are traveling in that direction and passing there anyway on your journey, there's a formal requirement to continue for "four mil" to attend a minyan.
May
15
comment ADHD and Ameilus B'Torah
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/31303. This involves the same principle as in the other question, namely that ameilus does not imply that you need to burden yourself with inefficiencies. There's a story from the 1930's: Canadian politician William Aberhart observed construction workers digging with shovels and picks. He asked them why they weren't using heavy machinery, which would increase efficiency and productivity. When he was told that this method allowed for the hiring of more laborers, he replied that the workers should dig with spoons, then, to create even more work.
May
15
comment Why do we avoid inviting people to a b'rit milah specifically, and not other celebrations too?
Actually, the Rama doesn't directly mention the idea to avoid inviting people, but the Pischei T'shuva (YD 265:18) cites the מקום שמואל (number 80) in the name of the Sharvit HaZahav as the source for this custom. The Rama just mentions that someone who avoids attending a circumcision feast is considered as if he is excommunicated by Heaven.
May
15
comment Why do we avoid inviting people to a b'rit milah specifically, and not other celebrations too?
...Essentially, a Jewish wedding feast is considered a mitzva feast (see P'sachim 49, and this article for some proofs of this), and it may even be a higher level of mitzva feast than for a circumcision (see, for e.g., Bei'ur HaGra OC 640:6).
May
15
comment Why do we avoid inviting people to a b'rit milah specifically, and not other celebrations too?
+1. This is a great question. You'd think the same reasoning would apply to a wedding feast, for example. This is based on P'sachim 113b, which mentions an opinion that people who avoid participating in a gathering for a mitzva feast are considered excommunicated by Heaven. Based on P'sachim 49a, Rashi (113b) and Tosafos (114a) give examples of such a mitzva feast: for a circumcision and for a wedding between a kohen and the daughter of a kohen (the latter e.g. was really only given to contrast with a case where the daughter of a kohen marries an 'am ha'aretz of the basest order).
May
15
comment Is it permitted to listen to Prank phone calls
I don't think deriving enjoyment from finding something humorous is technically prohibited as an issur hana'a, but I suppose there might be a different prohibition of moshav leitzim (joining a group of scoffers) or encouraging bad behavior or the like.
May
14
comment Magazine subscription that doesn't cancel
@Yishai If the worker is empowered to do that at his discretion, that's probably the same as if the owner did it himself.
May
14
comment Magazine subscription that doesn't cancel
Are you assuming the magazine is (1) aware that you are not paying, (2) unaware, or (3) are you unsure?
May
14
comment Intentionally mispronouncing lashon hakodesh in religious services
See Bava Basra 21a-b, for a story involving mispronouncing parshas 'Amalek.
May
14
comment Broken פ- What's wrong with it?
The M"B was citing the K'siva Tamma here. See also this blog post and accompanying comments.
May
14
revised Broken פ- What's wrong with it?
added link to image of broken פ
May
14
comment How do I explain my heritage to my son? (as someone who has left Judaism at a young age)
There are also a lot of free classes out there for beginners.
May
14
comment Can a convert be a prophet?
@Shamiach Specifically on 90a: כגון חנניה בן עזור שמתחלתו נביא אמת ולבסוף נביא שקר.