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Feb
20
comment Couple's showing affection in public
The Nimukei Yoseif (Bava Basra 31 in dapei haRif) was talking about the story on Bava Basra 58a about Avraham resting in Sarah's arms in their burial place in מערת המכפלה. In the story there, Avraham gave permission to be viewed with Sarah since they were no longer alive. See the Taz, for e.g., who distinguishes between that degree of public affection, which he says is forbidden, and checking for lice, which he says is not appropriate (אינו נכון).
Feb
20
comment Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
@IsaacKotlicky Then perhaps you could post that Rashi as an answer here?
Feb
20
comment How do we know that the Megillah reader in shul must accommodate a cheresh?
I think Esther 4:14 and 7:4 could be used to good effect here.
Feb
20
comment Is it really kosher to “apply” to become a gentile king's wife?
@mevaqesh Ah, I see. As far as writing your own answer, I didn't mean to suggest that you should write an answer only about the Ba'al HaMa'or, as that wouldn't answer the question. I was suggesting that if you write an alternative answer, you could include the Ba'al HaMa'or in your answer as part of an explanation for why you do not assume that Esther was married to Mordechai.
Feb
20
comment Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
@IsaacKotlicky Maybe, but see the mishna (Yadayim 4:5, codified by the Rambam in Hil. Avos HaTum'a 9:7), which seems to say that it has to be written in k'sav Ashuris in order to defile hands: "תרגום שכתבו עברית ועברית שכתבו תרגום וכתב עברי, אינו מטמא את הידיים. לעולם אינו מטמא עד שיכתבנו אשורית על העור ובדיו". Though perhaps you could argue that this limitation applies only to defiling hands for תרומה, whereas maybe even יוונית could defile hands for קודש.
Feb
20
comment Correcting one's father or one's rav when he is leyning
@DoubleAA Okay then, mentioned in the Tur.
Feb
20
comment Correcting one's father or one's rav when he is leyning
@DanF The additional factor of possibly humiliating one's father or rabbi might affect whether one should follow the lenient opinion of the Tur (IIRC) not to make corrections.
Feb
20
comment Is it really kosher to “apply” to become a gentile king's wife?
@mevaqesh Rather than editing Yishai's answer in a manner possibly contrary to his intent, I suggest that you let your comments suffice (or also downvote if you think "this answer is not useful"). Perhaps also write your own answer to present your take; I expect that an answer based on the Ba'al HaMaor would be well received. But I don't think an answer needs to be revised whenever it takes an aggadic statement from the Talmud at face value (especially a non-fantastical aggadic statement that was likely intended to be understood literally).
Feb
20
reviewed Approve Should one make a bracha on food if only a child is eating?
Feb
20
comment Correcting one's father or one's rav when he is leyning
...unless the issue is the unpleasantness felt by being corrected, in which case that might be problematic even for glaring mistakes.
Feb
20
comment Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
@mweiss That's a good question. Maybe s'farim written in יוונית do in fact defile hands?
Feb
20
comment Correcting one's father or one's rav when he is leyning
Regarding correcting one's parent or rav in general, one could follow the Rambam (Hil. Mamrim 6:11, based on Kiddushin 32a) and phrase the correction as a question. Perhaps the analogue in correcting Torah reading would be to intonate the correction as if it is a question. If the corrections would be frequent, or on a section of the Torah that people are expected to know well, then perhaps that adds another layer of complication due to possible embarrassment. Then again, if they are glaring mistakes that everyone else notices anyway, perhaps correcting them would not add embarrassment.
Feb
20
comment Is it really kosher to “apply” to become a gentile king's wife?
@mevaqesh The gemara cited by Yishai (M'gilla 15a) is itself a factor in extensive halachic discussions regarding whether a woman is permitted to her husband (see e.g. R' Sh'lomo Kluger on EH 178, who explains that Ya'el was permitted to her husband because her actions directly allowed her to kill Sisera and save the Jews, whereas Esther's actions merely helped her gain favor in the eyes of Achashveirosh which indirectly allowed her to save the Jews).
Feb
20
comment Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
@mweiss Well, as mevaqesh pointed out, Rashi defines ספרים that way explicitly on 8b, but it is in a different context.
Feb
20
comment Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
@mweiss That's the implied meaning when Rashi uses the expression "כשאר ספרים". S'farim in that context means books of Tanach.
Feb
20
comment Help me find a source for glossing “sefer” (in Shabbat 14a) as “Torah, Nevi'im, and Ketuvim”
Specifically, I think you are looking for Rashi on M'gilla 7a: אינה מטמאה את הידים. כשאר ספרים דאמר ביציאות השבת (דף יד.) שגזרו עליהן לטמא את הידים.
Feb
20
comment Why did I become queen?
@Cnsersmoit The Y'rushalmi (M'gilla 1:5) says that מגילת אסתר will never be annulled: "ר' יוחנן אמר הנביאים והכתובים עתידין ליבטל וחמשה סיפרי תורה אינן עתידין ליבטל מה טעמא (דברים ה) קול גדול ולא יסף רשב"ל אמר אף מגילת אסתר". M'gilla 10b says the holiday of Purim will never be annulled: "רבי שמואל בר נחמני פתח לה פיתחא להאי פרשתא מהכא... והיה לה' לשם זו מקרא מגילה לאות עולם לא יכרת אלו ימי פורים".
Feb
20
comment Is it better to skip Asher Yotzar, or to say it without washing?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/50694 and judaism.stackexchange.com/a/51362
Feb
20
comment Is it really kosher to “apply” to become a gentile king's wife?
Note that there are different opinions about what justified Esther to take an active role as opposed to a passive role (קרקע עולם, per Abaye in Sanhedrin 74b). The Noda BiYhuda (II YD 161), for example, says this was only allowed because it was necessary to save the Jewish nation, whereas the Sh'vus Ya'akov (II 117) says it was allowed to save masses of Jews (which is to say, the Sh'vus Ya'akov would permit taking an active role to save masses of people even if the entire nation was not at risk).
Feb
19
comment Is it really kosher to “apply” to become a gentile king's wife?
@SAH Her actual father and mother had died, so Mordechai raised her (Esther 2:7).