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Jun
17
revised Telling G-d Lashon Harah
deleted 28 characters in body
Jun
17
comment Is there any contemporary posek who says you can deviate from the wording in the shmona esrei?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/9355 and judaism.stackexchange.com/q/34169 and judaism.stackexchange.com/q/35681
Jun
17
answered Telling G-d Lashon Harah
Jun
16
answered Kohelet citation - better peace and poor then rich and without peace
Jun
16
comment how to clean up from one meal for another on shabbos?
Re. shaking the crumbs outside, it depends on whether there is wind that can cause the crumbs to scatter when shaking out the cloth (if so, zoreh is an issue, see here).
Jun
16
comment How can a modern non-Jew approach the Torah?
@Andrew And to clarify further, Judaism maintains that a non-Jew is bound by the 7 Laws regardless of whether he commits to them. (Namely, Don't: [1] murder, [2] steal, [3] perform idolatry, [4] commit adultery or incest, [5] blaspheme, [6] eat a limb from a live animal. Do: [7] As a society, establish courts of law). Still, one who commits to these laws and observes them for the purpose of serving God is considered righteous.
Jun
16
comment Why does Gehazi have no share in the world to come?
@Shalom I suspect that a good percentage of those prisoners began to study Daf Yomi after they were imprisoned, perhaps as part of an overall effort to do t'shuva and transform themselves positively, even if they were ostensibly or nominally religious before. Additionally, I've also heard that there's a Daf Yomi group at Otisville, but do you know the actual or approximate number of attendees (considering that there are fewer than two dozen frum inmates in the Federal prison system, out of around 200,000 total inmates in Federal prison)?
Jun
16
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Rosh hashana: is it really two days?
Jun
16
comment How can a modern non-Jew approach the Torah?
@Andrew Re. your last question, the Talmud (Sanhedrin 56a-b) derives the Seven Noahide Laws using the Talmudic rules of exegesis.
Jun
16
comment How can a modern non-Jew approach the Torah?
@Andrew Re. your first question, the Talmud (Sanhedrin 2a-b) derives that the court must have 23 judges because: 1. There are verses indicating that the court must have enough judges for a quorum ruling to convict and a quorum ruling to acquit, and another verse indicates that a quorum is 10 men - thus 20. 2. In addition, the Talmud derives from verses that a court cannot try the case unless it is possible to convict with a majority of 2 despite 10 acquitting judges - thus 22 judges. 3. The court must have an odd number of judges to rule out a tie, which verses also proscribe. Hence, 23.
Jun
16
comment How can a modern non-Jew approach the Torah?
Re. the circumstances involved in a capital case, the violator must be warned immediately in advance that the such-and-such an act is a violation of such-and-such a prohibition, and its transgression is punishable by death. Still, unless the violator clearly and verbally indicates his full understanding of the warning and that he will can be tried for a capital crime if he proceeds (he must respond to the witnesses: "I know, and it is with this understanding that I do this/that is why I am doing this"), he cannot be executed. Thus, only a defiant and flagrant violator can be tried.
Jun
16
comment How can a modern non-Jew approach the Torah?
@Andrew Re. your 2nd question: At any given time, there was a single Supreme Court of 71 judges, but several high courts of 23 judges. Any of those high courts could try capital cases, though they only had the authority to do so as long as the Supreme Court was presiding on the Temple Mount. Courts of 23 and the Supreme Court of 71 were both called sanhedrin, but the Supreme Court was called the Great Sanhedrin (an unqualified reference to the "Sanhedrin" is often colloquially used to mean the Great Sanhedrin).
Jun
16
comment Should someone who is falsely convicted by a relgious court attempt to avoid the death penalty?
See this comment.
Jun
16
comment Is it a sin to escape the death penalty?
@SethJ Death by execution may serve as an additional atonement because it also has the effect of discouraging others from sinning in the future (such as mentioned in D'varim 17:13, וכל העם ישמעו ויראו ולא יזידון עוד).
Jun
16
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Reference to Moshiach in Proverbs Chapter 8?
Jun
16
comment why half-believe the Torah?
Further, the Torah says: "And the Children of Israel walked on dry land inside the sea, and the water was a wall for them on their right side and on their left side" (Sh'mos 14:29). Those who propose that the sea split via natural means usually describe a scenario where the Jews would have trudged through mud and where the water was not suspended in the form of a wall. They do not view the event as being as physically dramatic and seemingly unnatural as these verses describe.
Jun
15
comment Kibud Av v'Ach?
Note: כבוד applies to an older brother, but מורא does not. So, for example, you may call him by name and sit in his seat. Regarding standing when he enters the room, see here.
Jun
15
awarded  Electorate
Jun
13
comment How can a modern non-Jew approach the Torah?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/26316 and judaism.stackexchange.com/q/14400
Jun
13
comment How can a modern non-Jew approach the Torah?
I'll comment briefly so that you don't have to wait for a proper answer to get some clarification. 1. The Talmud derives from the Torah that capital cases cannot be tried unless the High Court of 71 judges presides from the Temple Mount, a condition that hasn't existed for 2,000 years. 2. The Torah indicates that cases must be tried by a court of judges, and the Talmud derives exegetically that only a superior court of 23 judges can try capital cases. 3. The Torah requires two valid witnesses and extensive investigation for a conviction, as well as other criteria.