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22h
comment Does this quotation have its roots in the words of King Solomon?
@Rish "Heart" as a metaphor sometimes carries different connotations in Hebrew vs. English. In verse you cited,לֵב שֹׁמֵעַ appears to be meant most simply in an intellectual or intuitive sense rather than meaning "kind," "generous," or the like (as it appears to mean in the quote from the film). See here, for example.
23h
comment Is Torah meant to be kept forever?
This may be a duplicate of judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/37379/laws-of-abrogation, but, either way, it is definitely related.
1d
comment How does the talmud know that the mashiach's name was known before creation?
@MonicaCellio I'll be busy for the next few hours, but perhaps I'll have a chance to expand that into an answer this evening.
1d
comment How does the talmud know that the mashiach's name was known before creation?
@MonicaCellio Well, it would still be unclear how the Talmud changed the seeming future tense of verse 17 into past tense (although the Targum explicitly does just that). One possibility I can think of is that the Talmud is homiletically reading "לִפְנֵי שֶׁמֶשׁ יִנּוֹן שְׁמוֹ" in isolation as a divine statement that was made prior to Creation. (Interestingly, this phrase is even understood homiletically in Sanhedrin 98b to indicate that the Mashiach's name is a variant of Yanai: "Before the sun, Yinon is his name").
1d
comment How does the talmud know that the mashiach's name was known before creation?
The Targum (T'hillim 72:1) reads the introduction to this psalm as meaning that Sh'lomo prophetically composed it as a reference to the Mashiach. (Accordingly, the final verse of the psalm would not specifically refer to this psalm). The Ibn Ezra also considers the possibility that this psalm was written about the Mashiach.
1d
comment Can someone please tell me what my tallit gadol has printed on it? I can't read Hebrew without vowels.​
@Shokhet Well, it is actually a dispute whether it is pronounced "b'tzitzit" or "batzitzit." Most acharonim rule that it is the former (see commentaries on Tur and Shulchan Aruch OC 8:5), but most siddurim I have seen (and this answer by Noach) indicate it is the latter. (Edit: I just noticed that sam commented on this above, too).
1d
comment Wrong price knowingly at checkout
It is critical to distinguish between the owner of a store and a clerk. The answer you provided clearly applies to an owner, but with a clerk it is a case of a third party making a mistake that causes a loss to the owner. Generally, the reason it is okay to let a clerk make an error is because the owner or manager of the store has a policy that forgives small errors made by clerks. If a store does not have such a policy, it is less clear that it would be allowed to benefit from a clerk's error.
2d
comment What is the difference between HaSatan, Luficer and the Serpent
It's just one example of a quote, but okay: "לכל אין מחזירין אותו חוץ ממי שלא אמר מחיה המתים ומכניע זדים ובונה ירושלים אני אומר מין הוא". This implies that there the future rebuilding of Jerusalem and the resurrection of the dead are tenets of belief that underpin two of the blessings of the 'Amida.
2d
comment What is the difference between HaSatan, Luficer and the Serpent
This is a topic that can be (and has been) discussed ad nauseam, so I'll just reiterate that the characterization of traditional Jewish belief in your answer is fundamentally incorrect. You yourself partially concede this in your comments about the necessary belief in Torah from Heaven and the resurrection of the dead, though there are plenty of definitive Talmudic statements that explain the more expansive parameters of heretical belief (e.g. Y'rushalmi B'rachos 5:3).
2d
comment What is the difference between HaSatan, Luficer and the Serpent
You had me until the final two paragraphs, where I totally disagree with your evaluation that "Judaism focuses on orthopraxy" and that "we aren't concerned with the right belief." There is room in Judaism for a wide range of beliefs on many issues, but you have essentially reduced Jewish belief to something infinitely flexible and of minor significance at best. So instead of +1, I'm going with -1.
2d
comment What's a good technique for a not-so-strong person to do [Ashkenazi] Hagbaha?
Related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/52911
2d
comment ה׳ מלך for Rosh Hashanah Day Two
Note that Rabbi Shimon of Mainz typically used complex acrostic structures, especially those referencing his kidnapped son Elchanan (as in the interlaced acrostic in this piyut, beginning in the stanza "kol yakirei yofi", and in the first piyut of birchos k'riyas Sh'ma' of the second day of Rosh HaShana - "Melech Amon Ma'amar'cha").
2d
comment Hoeitz-Hoadama…I made a mistake
^^^ ping @msh210
2d
comment Hoeitz-Hoadama…I made a mistake
Also vaguely related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/57762. | Actually, is the link in my previous comment a duplicate of the OP? ping @IsaacKotlicky
2d
comment ה׳ מלך for Rosh Hashanah Day Two
While the expression "eilu v'eilu" evokes the Talmudic phrase, it's used differently here as a liturgical device to compare the otherwise radically different angels and humans in terms of their shared declaration of HaShem's kingship.
2d
comment Hoeitz-Hoadama…I made a mistake
Closely related: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/56577
Jul
1
comment Why was it so important for Hashem to create the 'mouth' of the ass
Different approaches to this can be taken. Some useful source material includes Zohar (Balak 201b, for a kabbalistic approach), P'siktasa Zutrasa (Balak), Rabbeinu Bechaye (Bamidbar 22:28), P'ri Tzadik (ibid.), S'fas Emes (ibid.), Alshich (Sh'mos 34:1-3), and Meiri on Avos (ch. 5). (Actually, a number of these sources complement each other).
Jul
1
comment Can small enough amounts of animal rennet pass kosher standards?
Somewhat related: judaism.stackexchange.com/a/29214 (see the second paragraph).
Jun
30
comment Can someone please tell me what my tallit gadol has printed on it? I can't read Hebrew without vowels.​
@GettingNifty Regarding holy names on a computer screen, see judaism.stackexchange.com/q/1186 (see also judaism.stackexchange.com/q/7275).
Jun
29
comment Does Judaism have anything on maiden names?
@Shokhet Some women keep their maiden names in a professional context, but adopt their husbands' surnames in a social context.