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35m
comment “Praiseworthy is he who will clutch and dash your infants against the rock”?
The parallel language in the final two verses is a poetic means of expressing the barbarism of the Babylonians who actually seized small Jewish children and smashed them against boulders. By extension, this starkly illustrates the suffering of the Jews at that time.
1h
comment Moshiach and Shemittah
According to a recording I heard of him speaking, R' Kanievsky shlit"a just indicated that, according to the gemara in M'gilla that you cited, "במוצאי שביעית בן דוד בא." This means some time during the following year, not immediately at the end of the sh'mita year. I believe the article may be slightly misleading, or is at least phrased in a manner that could lead someone to mistakenly think R' Kanievsky was referring to the immediate end of this year.
1h
answered Rav Yaakov Emden and the Survival of the Jewish people
1h
comment Rav Yaakov Emden and the Survival of the Jewish people
A quick Google search yields this article by R' Howard Jachter: As Rabbi Jacob Emden has commented, in the introduction to his siddur (prayer book): “By the life of my head,” the greatest miracle is the continued survival of the Jewish people. Rabbi Emden, writing in the eighteenth century, asserts that the miracle of Jewish survival in our prolonged exile is even greater than the miracle of the splitting of the Red Sea.
1h
comment References in the Talmud or Rishonim to marijuana or any non-alcoholic drug use?
As far as the advice in P'sachim, the Talmud doesn't mention the word "habitually," though Rashi, but not Rashbam, understands it this way. The reason given by both commentators is that it can lead to addiction (though Rashi mentions a second explanation that such remedies help with one condition but exacerbate another). The second source you mention refers to medicines or curatives in general, not specifically addictive or psychoactive ones.
2h
comment How to deal with modern archaeological knowledge regarding supposed polytheism of ancient Israel?
Regarding your #4: Even among secular archaeologists who reject the mesorah and the unified, divine authorship of the Pentateuch, many consider Az Yashir to be at least a pre-monarchic text. So Sh'mos 15:2,11,18 should be of interest to them.
3h
comment Why did Moses add part of the tribe of Menashe to join Re'uvean and Gad on the east of the Jordan?
If you are trying to make the point mentioned in your comment here, this answer would be improved my including that explicitly (I think you make an interesting point, actually). Simply quoting the verses leaves the reader to draw his own conclusions that may or may not accord with your intent.
3h
comment Use of speaking “Baruch HaShem” in 1492 Spain
@sabbahillel Doesn't Spanish also use gendered terms (e.g. hijo or niño vs. hija or niña)? And if not, a rabbi speaking in Hebrew would probably say "my son" or "my daughter," but he would probably use the conventional expression when speaking in Spanish.
3h
comment Use of speaking “Baruch HaShem” in 1492 Spain
Even if that particular expression was used in that period, what motivation does the rabbi have to use it in that context (per the above comment by @IsaacMoses)? Is he glad to learn that at least some few Spanish children are not antisemitic or are willing to show kindness or courtesy to a Jew? Did the rabbi not realize this seemingly obvious fact before? (The flowers themselves can't mean that much to him, and even if they did, he would have picked them up by himself anyway, right?)
5h
comment Is it permitted for a Ben-Noach be an atheist?
@Yishai I'm not suggesting that they would be in the same category as חסידי עומות העולם, who are entitled to a share by default. Also, I'm not basing this idea mainly on "אלא מכחמיהם". The Mishna's omission of non-Jews (as a class) from those excluded from עוה"ב (a list that includes Bil'am, the people of S'dom, and the dor hamabbul) may suggest this (Sanhedrin 10:2-3). In fact, this is the conclusion of the gemara (Sanhedrin 105a, "מתניתין מני רבי יהושע היא"; see Rashi, s.v. מאי נינהו, who appears to go beyond the Rambam and says the non-wicked among the nations are entitled to עוה"ב).
16h
answered How is marriage understood to have taken away reproach in Isaiah 4:1
22h
comment Must a non-Jew accept the Noachide laws as binding?
Many versions of the Rambam have the phrasing, "אלא מחכמיהם" ("rather, [they are merely] of their wise men"). This seems to imply that there is some value in observing the laws even without believing they are divinely commanded; even though this is improper, it is notably superior to violation of the laws. See comments on this answer.
22h
comment Is it permitted for a Ben-Noach be an atheist?
@Yishai See Igros Moshe (OC II §25), who makes the point that this Rambam implies an overarching requirement for non-Jews to believe in HaShem. However, I think the "אלא מחכמיהם" emendation lends more credence to the notion that someone who observes the Seven Laws (possibly even including monotheistic belief) not out of a belief that they were divinely commanded may still be able to earn a share in the World to Come (though, unlike chasidei 'umos ha'olam, they are not automatically guaranteed such a share via the 7 Laws).
1d
comment How does Judaism answer the problem of evil?
@DoubleAA Or maybe "these sorts of persecutions were predicted."
1d
comment Is there any reason a Jewish woman should not shake hands with a non-Jewish man?
@DoubleAA Well, it may be a rabbinic concern for non-Jewish women (depending on how to you understand the Rambam in Hil. Issurei Bi'ah 12:2 and the underlying gemara).
1d
comment How does Judaism answer the problem of evil?
I think it is partly a duplicate of that question, and also maybe partly a duplicate of judaism.stackexchange.com/q/863.
Jul
24
comment How does Judaism answer the problem of evil?
I agree with most of the substance of what you wrote, though I think the tone is too harsh given the seemingly benign intentions of the OP (even though OP's choice of words could be viewed as offensive, I don't expect it was meant that way). And your current phrasing seems to monolithically aggregate non-Jews (including the OP) into a guilty collective. That is perhaps unfair, and it does not have direct bearing on the heart of the OP's presumably well-intentioned question. All in all, I think this answer has great potential, but I would not upvote it in its current form.
Jul
24
comment How does Judaism answer the problem of evil?
For more about the problem of evil and suffering in general, see: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/863 and judaism.stackexchange.com/q/9170. See also: judaism.stackexchange.com/q/8861, judaism.stackexchange.com/q/38527, judaism.stackexchange.com/q/23067, and judaism.stackexchange.com/q/36161.
Jul
24
comment Location of source for a midrash of Zipporah on Har Sinai?
@user6591 I think that's what Isaac Kotlicky was suggesting.
Jul
24
comment SE Challenge: Halachot in which rulings range from permissible to Torah violation?
@RobertS.Barnes Clear how? That it's referring to dayanim? I agree. That he can only get paid if he was going to otherwise be working at that exact time? I'm not so sure. There's room to interpret the Rambam expansively as meaning that he can accept the amount of compensation he would have gotten had he been working during that time (this is supported by K'subos 105a, "קרנא בטילא דמוכחא הוה", though Rav Huna went above and beyond to show he actually would have been working instead). And the underlying halachic principle may also apply to full-time judges who are qualified for other work.