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seen Apr 8 at 0:34

Jan
13
answered Kissing the hand to catch a cold?
Jan
8
answered Can a Jew marry a Free Mason?
Jan
2
comment May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
Context is also important - e.g., a person may think they see a problematic behavior engaged by another person but are incorrect due to lack of context.
Jan
2
comment May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
Exactly. I agree. The distinction is necessary. If a person repeats Hashem's Name contrary to halacha - or violates halacha otherwise due to feeling a need to do so, that may indicate a problem - particularly if a person does this regularly for an extended period of time (e.g., over the period of a few years, for example). When judging whether a person is acting contrary to halacha, it is important that the person doing the "judging" be familiar with the halacha to know whether the other individual is acting in line with any halachically acceptable psak.
Jan
2
comment May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
See added introductory note above the answer. I thought that my answer did not appear to be critical of the questioner. However, sometimes when others review an answer, they may see areas that could use added clarification. I appreciate those comments - יישר כחכם!
Jan
2
revised May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
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Jan
2
comment May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
I'll add an intro. sentence clarifying that my answer - where critical - is directed at some people who jump to conclusions about OCD - often with faulty basis - and certainly the criticism is not directed at the questioner. Repeating a sentence of davening 20 times - especially regularly - would certainly be different than a person who spends more time on davening because they say more tefillos and try to have added kavanah. Btw, concerning pausing in Shemoneh Esrei there are limitations (not pausing longer than it takes to recite the entire S"E between b'rachos...) limiting duration of S"E.
Jan
2
comment May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
I was making a general statement and did not refer to the questioner as making any problematic statements with respect to people who may have OCD. I did not criticize the questioner. Instead parts of my answer that were critical are directed at some other people (again, not the questioner) who quickly conclude that a person has (or likely has) OCD using as their guide certain behaviors that may not be "typical" - such as a three hour Shacharis (vs. 45 minutes). By Shacharis, I refer to all of the tefillah, as well as additional tefillos associated with Shacharis, some of which are optional.
Jan
2
answered May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
Jun
20
awarded  Nice Answer
May
18
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
@AdamMosheh, (1.) There may be cases when we choose a lenient p'sak, if reasonable and well supported, rather than push someone away from observance altogether (see Taz, YD 334). (2.) Distorting sources to arrive at a predetermined, desired p'sak - that's what's outside of the mainstream about it. That approach undermines the integrity of the halachic process.
May
18
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
@AdamMosheh The second basis is that there is a machlokes about whether kol isha is a general issur, or whether it is also assur to recite Shema within earshot of a woman singing. Somehow, the latter opinion morphed into "it is ONLY assur to hear a woman singing during Shema, but in general it is fine." These are examples of why these opinions are "outside of mainstream p'sak," as I said.
May
18
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
...The Sridei Eish held that the combination of the following factors should permit youth groups where mixed singing is done: (1.) No single voice is prominent, (2.) the leniency of the Divrei Chefetz (which he found cited in the Sdei Chemed), and (3.) the desperate need for European youth groups for kiruv. Even looking at the Divrei Chefetz by itself, it is talking about hearing non-romantic kol isha without any intent to enjoy it. Somehow, the article morphed this into listening "specifically for the sake of sexual pleasure" or listening to explicitly "lewd songs" and "erotic content."….
May
18
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
@AdamMosheh - Two main reasons are given in the article for permitting listening to kol isha in general. The first is derived from a little known sefer called Divrei Chefetz, which was cited by the Sdei Chemed. The Divrei Chefetz said that, if the person does not listen to the song for enjoyment, it is muttar to hear a woman sing zemiros, dirges, or lullabies to put children to sleep, because these kinds of songs are not romantic. The Sdei Chemed defended the reasoning behind this opinion as sound, but nevertheless disagreed with it and stated that it ought not to be followed….
May
17
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
@DoubleAA I saw that article before I responded. With respect to married women not having to cover their hair, kol isha, and some of the other points, the article takes positions that are non-normative and outside of mainstream p'sak. In particular, the ruling permitting kol isha in general was derived from a quasi-Orthodox source, and that position is halachicly unacceptable. Also, the answer did not directly address the question, which was asking about tznius in the context of tefillah.
May
17
revised What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
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May
17
answered What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
May
17
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
What are the halachic sources for what Rabbis Angel and Shammah write? When providing a halachic response, it is imperative to include halachic responsa that is based in halacha. If the above is truly "Halacha l'ma'aseh", including statements such as a married woman's hair not being considered ervah and that a woman singing (religious songs) in front of men is not forbidden to listen to on account of kol isha, where is the halachic basis? These statements seem to be revolutionary and certainly require halachic sources (simply quoting these rabbis is not considered bringing a halachic source).
May
17
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
The halacha differs significantly if you are asking about the requirements for the woman herself (e.g., if she is praying alone) or in the presence of other women or other men. Are you talking about all three situations?
Apr
30
answered Hardboiled eggs and salt water at the Seder