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seen Oct 12 at 6:42

Apr
10
awarded  Yearling
Mar
13
comment Tanis Esther start on the ELAL flight
Based on Igros Moshe (as quoted in the top link), it appears that his opinion is that the fast ends at Tzeis depending on your location. (See last paragraph in the right column - hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14676&st=&pgnum=410) My Zmanim has a link you can use (if you log in) where you enter your flight info. and it gives the zmanim range based on the flight and actual departure time. Apparently, going east would shorten the fast (and would cause the fast to start earlier) while going west would lengthen the fast (and cause it to start later). Tzom Kal - Have an easy fast.
Feb
11
comment Does an incomplete oath count?
Right, I was thinking that just saying the words quoted, since it doesn't verbally include any prohibition (or statement otherwise) or even specify anything else beyond the statement, that it wouldn't be considered a shevua. However, this is just what I'm thinking, without having looked at any sources to determine what the halacha would be.
Feb
10
comment Does an incomplete oath count?
In terms of creating prohibitions. Again, without actually saying anything aside from what was quoted in the question (in other words, not actually making any statement creating any prohibition or saying that anything should happen/be effected). Stopping short of saying anything beyond the quoted words.
Feb
10
revised Does an incomplete oath count?
edited body
Feb
10
asked Does an incomplete oath count?
Apr
10
awarded  Yearling
Jan
15
comment Kissing the hand to catch a cold?
@Aryeh Yes. Offer the rabbi constructive criticism in private while showing him respect. Softly rebuking the rabbi is in line with the mitzvah of rebuking a fellow Jew so he does not sin, as it says in The Torah הוכח תוכיח את עמיתך ולא תשא" עליו חטא" (Vayikra: 19; 17). In addition the prohibition of "לא תעמוד על דם רעך" - not standing idly by the blood of your fellow" (19; 16) also refers to protecting others from monetary loss or other harm. (See Rambam Sefer HaMitzvos - Prohibition # 297)
Jan
15
comment Kissing the hand to catch a cold?
@msh210 Perhaps. However, if what he has is not communicable (e.g., asthma) and he says he feels sick, he should clarify that he has something non-communicable like asthma. Typically when someone acts sick and says they are sick, it is because they have something communicable and others should be wary to avoid coming into contact with that person. At the very least, they should be chosheish that the person truly has something that can be caught.
Jan
13
comment Kissing the hand to catch a cold?
By the way, I know of someone in Israel who has the flu now. Little babies can be at much higher risk, so if the rabbi - or anyone else - is irresponsible, that can risk the life of a little baby. It is the obligation of a person to act responsibly so as not to cause harm to others.
Jan
13
comment Kissing the hand to catch a cold?
If the rabbi is shaking hands notwithstanding his having a cold (especially at the present when he has a cold), it is likely such advice would not work. Just inconspicuously explain that you don't want to catch a cold. He should understand.
Jan
13
answered Kissing the hand to catch a cold?
Jan
8
answered Can a Jew marry a Free Mason?
Jan
2
comment May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
Context is also important - e.g., a person may think they see a problematic behavior engaged by another person but are incorrect due to lack of context.
Jan
2
comment May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
Exactly. I agree. The distinction is necessary. If a person repeats Hashem's Name contrary to halacha - or violates halacha otherwise due to feeling a need to do so, that may indicate a problem - particularly if a person does this regularly for an extended period of time (e.g., over the period of a few years, for example). When judging whether a person is acting contrary to halacha, it is important that the person doing the "judging" be familiar with the halacha to know whether the other individual is acting in line with any halachically acceptable psak.
Jan
2
comment May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
See added introductory note above the answer. I thought that my answer did not appear to be critical of the questioner. However, sometimes when others review an answer, they may see areas that could use added clarification. I appreciate those comments - יישר כחכם!
Jan
2
revised May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
added 353 characters in body
Jan
2
comment May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
I'll add an intro. sentence clarifying that my answer - where critical - is directed at some people who jump to conclusions about OCD - often with faulty basis - and certainly the criticism is not directed at the questioner. Repeating a sentence of davening 20 times - especially regularly - would certainly be different than a person who spends more time on davening because they say more tefillos and try to have added kavanah. Btw, concerning pausing in Shemoneh Esrei there are limitations (not pausing longer than it takes to recite the entire S"E between b'rachos...) limiting duration of S"E.
Jan
2
comment May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?
I was making a general statement and did not refer to the questioner as making any problematic statements with respect to people who may have OCD. I did not criticize the questioner. Instead parts of my answer that were critical are directed at some other people (again, not the questioner) who quickly conclude that a person has (or likely has) OCD using as their guide certain behaviors that may not be "typical" - such as a three hour Shacharis (vs. 45 minutes). By Shacharis, I refer to all of the tefillah, as well as additional tefillos associated with Shacharis, some of which are optional.
Jan
2
answered May we intervene with Religious OCD sufferers?