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seen Aug 12 at 22:35

Jul
7
answered Is it permitted to have an abortion if divorce if imminent?
Jul
2
answered Are “Price-Tag” Attacks halachically sound?
Jun
20
answered How does Silence lead to wisdom
Jun
20
answered Telling G-d Lashon Harah
Jun
20
comment Telling G-d Lashon Harah
shmirashalashon.blogspot.com/2006/12/…
May
22
comment Do primary sources unequivocally record coming of the Moshiach and establishing world order
@Adel Are you referring to my answer or to the comment on my answer? In my answer I quoted the Book of Yeshayah (Isaiah), certainly a primary source. In the Tanach, there are numerous primary sources for the Mashiach and the Messianic era. In fact, religions that followed Judaism pick up many ideas from Judaism. For example, Islam's belief in the Messiah (Mahdi) was preceded by Judaism and the prophecies of Jewish prophets by roughly 1500 years (and this is just in reference to those prophets). For example the non-Jewish prophet Bilaam prophesied about the Messiah (as recorded in The Torah):-)
May
21
revised Do primary sources unequivocally record coming of the Moshiach and establishing world order
added 91 characters in body
May
21
comment Belief that a dead man will be the Messiah - Kfira?
@Jewels While the belief about Lubavitchers that the 7th Lubavitcher Rebbe is (and/or will be) the Mashiach is quite common, I'd recommend you take a look at a book on the subject - amazon.com/Rebbe-Messiah-Scandal-Orthodox-Indifference/dp/…. If you review this book, you will see that while certainly more commonplace (and a very significant issue), the belief of the Rebbe being the Mashiach is still 2nd to a much more significant problem, that while certainly less prevalent, would have major implications on many areas, including kashrus, eidus related issues, among others.
May
21
answered Do primary sources unequivocally record coming of the Moshiach and establishing world order
Apr
25
comment Rabbinical suppport for reducing noise at weddings
Absolutely. I would suggest contacting Gedolim and encouraging them to address this issue. Often, some important issues may not receive the attention they deserve, but when a "light" is shined on the issue and attention is called to it, it can quickly get the proper attention. This is also something important I have wanted to have changed for a while (and briefly tried). יישר כוחך and הצלחה רבה for you and any who try to get this issue properly addressed!
Apr
25
answered When Do We Finish Bowing in the Aleinu?
Apr
25
comment When Do We Finish Bowing in the Aleinu?
Basically, we bend the knees during the words "ואנחנו כורעים" and bow during the word "ומשתחוים" (Shulchan Shlomo: Siman 132, Sif 2) See my answer below for more.
Apr
25
revised Rabbinical suppport for reducing noise at weddings
added 10 characters in body
Apr
25
comment Rabbinical suppport for reducing noise at weddings
@DanF - You are correct about how breaking the glass often (inappropriately) STARTS the music... As we know, breaking the glass is a reminder of how we should limit our simcha in light of the destruction of the Beis HaMikdash, so it is strange that many people take the glass breaking as a "sign" to yell out "mazal tov". I heard of a wedding where the glass was broken earlier (perhaps to avoid it being used as a sign to start the merriment but perhaps also because we are supposed to be reminded at the beginning to put Jerusalem and the Beis HaMikdash above our happiness (Tehillim: 137, 6)).
Apr
25
answered Rabbinical suppport for reducing noise at weddings
Apr
10
awarded  Yearling
Mar
13
comment Tanis Esther start on the ELAL flight
Based on Igros Moshe (as quoted in the top link), it appears that his opinion is that the fast ends at Tzeis depending on your location. (See last paragraph in the right column - hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14676&st=&pgnum=410) My Zmanim has a link you can use (if you log in) where you enter your flight info. and it gives the zmanim range based on the flight and actual departure time. Apparently, going east would shorten the fast (and would cause the fast to start earlier) while going west would lengthen the fast (and cause it to start later). Tzom Kal - Have an easy fast.
Feb
11
comment Does an incomplete oath count?
Right, I was thinking that just saying the words quoted, since it doesn't verbally include any prohibition (or statement otherwise) or even specify anything else beyond the statement, that it wouldn't be considered a shevua. However, this is just what I'm thinking, without having looked at any sources to determine what the halacha would be.
Feb
10
comment Does an incomplete oath count?
In terms of creating prohibitions. Again, without actually saying anything aside from what was quoted in the question (in other words, not actually making any statement creating any prohibition or saying that anything should happen/be effected). Stopping short of saying anything beyond the quoted words.
Feb
10
revised Does an incomplete oath count?
edited body