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Apr
10
awarded  Yearling
Feb
11
revised Telling G-d Lashon Harah
Edited and formatted answer and removed paragraphs not directly relevant to the answer.
Feb
11
revised Telling G-d Lashon Harah
deleted 388 characters in body
Jan
23
comment What are the sources of saying a beracha before a cigarette?
I understand that and recognize the question was very specific - but my comments were for the minority of people who smoke who may either think that it is halachically acceptable or try to justify it. I was just pointing out that these opinions tend to be from before the time the dangers of smoking was universally recognized in the medical community and therefore these opinions are irrelevant as to halacha l'ma'aseh. The opinions that permitted smoking would, without exception, almost certainly have forbade it had they been aware of the dangers to the smoker and to others in their vicinity.
Jan
21
comment Lechatchila (To begin with) can the gabbai call someone to do Hagbah when he knows that person will not display the ktav (writing)
@CashCow It seems that only one who is able to do Hagbah properly on his own should do it. The Sha'arei Ephraim concludes "and Chazal were very strict about this that the mitzvos be done by someone who is able to fulfill it as it was instituted."
Jan
21
comment What are the sources of saying a beracha before a cigarette?
I wrote a more detailed comment on the above question. The comment is relevant to the practical halacha - since smoking is dangerous to the health, it is forbidden, and according to many opinions, it is forbidden to make a b'racha on something that's dangerous to the health - which is critically important (people shouldn't get the wrong idea that smoking is okay halachically - because it is forbidden). The K'sav Sofer lived prior to when the medical field (and the general population) was aware of the dangers of smoking (for oneself and others). I noted the practical halacha so people are aware
Jan
21
answered Lechatchila (To begin with) can the gabbai call someone to do Hagbah when he knows that person will not display the ktav (writing)
Jan
21
comment What are the sources of saying a beracha before a cigarette?
Concerning the halachic prohibition of smoking, I would refer you to the 2nd answer at this link- judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/10513/…
Jan
21
comment What are the sources of saying a beracha before a cigarette?
It is halachically forbidden to do anything that would harm one's health. It is forbidden to smoke cigarettes due to the health issues related. According to some opinions it is forbidden to say a b'racha on anything forbidden because of "בוצע ברך - נאץ ה'". It is a major sin to harm one's health. We should take into account when the Teshuvah was written - before doctors knew of the extent of the danger of smoking. Concerning the halachic prohibition of smoking, I would refer you to the 2nd answer at this link- judaism.stackexchange.com/questions/10513/…
Oct
12
answered Meaning and pronunciation of יישר כחך
Aug
28
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
@DoubleAA Thanks for pointing that out. The Ba"Ch quotes the Gemara and is even more explicit - when he notes one might think that there is no issue with hair (and some of the other Ervah) and then notes that these pesukim clearly demonstrate otherwise - that there is an objective source.
Aug
28
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
@DoubleAA While I presented the source in Hebrew for your benefit, just to paraphrase for others. The Bach (Rabbi Yoel Sirkis - known by the acronym of his work "Bayis Chadash" - Ba"Ch), quotes verses from the Book of Yeshyahu and Shir HaShirim, with respect to the Shok, a (married) woman's hair and voice (when singing) to demonstrate clearly that the places of Ervah are objective (objective Ervah does exist). I'd recommend checking out the source in full as I reference the link above. Thank you for your question and efforts to arrive at a source. I'm happy to have helped demonstrate otherwise
Aug
28
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
@DoubleAA Here's a source - the Bach (1561/62-1640) an early Acharon who wrote about 400 years ago (Siman 75, S"K 2) beta.hebrewbooks.org/tursa.aspx?a=oc_x187: ונראה דנקט שוק דאפילו פחות מטפח נמי חשוב ערוה וכדנפקא לן (כ״ד ע״א) מקרא (ישעיה מ״ז ב) גלי שוק עברי נהרות וכתיב (שם ג) תגל ערותך דמשמע כל שוק הוי ערוה אפילו פחות מטפח...מה שאין כן שוק שלה אי לאו דגלי לן קרא דערוה היא, וכן קול ושער הוה אמינא דאין לחוש להן אפילו באשת איש, אי לאו דכתיב קרא (שיר השירים ב׳ י״ד) כי קולך ערב, ושערך כעדר העזים (שם ל׳ אי) דמדמשבח לה קרא בגוייהו שמע מינה תאוה הוא, והכי מוכח להדיא ממה שכתב רש״י וז״ל שוק
Aug
27
comment What are “universal minimum” standards of tznius for halachic purposes?
@DoubleAA Are you looking for a Rishon that defines "Zero'a" and "Shok" (for example, while using language such as "everyone agrees that such is the definition"). Why would one think that these standards mentioned in the gemara are subjective (based on societal "norms") rather than objective? It's clear from the gemara that this is what "ervah" is, rather than something relevant to a given time period (for example).
Jul
7
answered Is it permitted to have an abortion if divorce if imminent?
Jul
2
answered Are “Price-Tag” Attacks halachically sound?
Jun
20
answered How does Silence lead to wisdom
Jun
20
answered Telling G-d Lashon Harah
Jun
20
comment Telling G-d Lashon Harah
shmirashalashon.blogspot.com/2006/12/…
May
22
comment Do primary sources unequivocally record coming of the Moshiach and establishing world order
@Adel Are you referring to my answer or to the comment on my answer? In my answer I quoted the Book of Yeshayah (Isaiah), certainly a primary source. In the Tanach, there are numerous primary sources for the Mashiach and the Messianic era. In fact, religions that followed Judaism pick up many ideas from Judaism. For example, Islam's belief in the Messiah (Mahdi) was preceded by Judaism and the prophecies of Jewish prophets by roughly 1500 years (and this is just in reference to those prophets). For example the non-Jewish prophet Bilaam prophesied about the Messiah (as recorded in The Torah):-)