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1d
comment Omission from Koteret to Hil. Talmud Torah
(1) No, what you are quoting is from the list of Mitzvot Aseh in the preface to the Mishneh Torah. Effectively, what you are asking is why in one listing of the Mitzvah he omits something he mentions in another, in the same book. This is not a conflict between Sefer ha-Mitzvot and the Mishneh Torah, as your question suggests. (By the way, check again: you're linking to the list of Mitzvot Aseh in the preface to the Mishneh Torah, not an old Sefer ha-Mitzvot.) (2) What are you referring to, when you say "מנין מצות הקצר"?
2d
comment Omission from Koteret to Hil. Talmud Torah
In spite of what you say, you are not quoting from Sefer ha-Mitzvot (there it says, in R Yosef Qafih's translation: "המצווה הי"א היא הציווי שנצטווינו ללמד חכמת התורה וללמדה - וזהו הנקרא: תלמוד תורה, והוא אמרו 'ושיננתם לבניך'"), but from the list of Mitsvot Aseh in the preface to the Mishneh Torah (like here).
Jul
24
comment Source for Jewish Chapter breaks in Tanach
@DanF If you're unaware of the Jewish division into chapters, then read Seder (Bible) in Wikipedia (which I already linked to in a comment above). For an example of it's marking, in Koren and Mossad HaRav Kook bibles, see: tanachyomi.co.il/body/Body_sample.php (where it says: "סימון סדר", as opposed to the Christian marking, where it says: "סימון פרקים ופסוקים"). Official or not, it's what the OP seems to be asking about.
Jul
24
comment Source for Jewish Chapter breaks in Tanach
@DanF The OP is asking about the Jewish division into chapters, like the one that appears in the Koren Bibles (at least the Hebrew ones). From what I can see, The Sefer ha-Toda'ah's account is of how the Christian division got in to the Chumashim (p. 340, and in more detail in pp. 351-2). The only Jewish divisions he seems to mention there are into Parashot ha-Shavu'a (and Aliyot), and into Parashot Petuchot and Setumot.
Jul
19
comment Why does G-d desire the prayer of the righteous?
@Shokhet That is a good question (and maybe should be asked separately), but the OP is asking vis-a-vis God's perfection (omnipotence?), which should be the same as the other question, regardless of the quality of the one praying. As I said, "possible" - not "definite" - duplicate.
Jul
10
comment Why does G-d desire the prayer of the righteous?
Possible duplicate: Since G-d is Omnipotent Why Does He Need Our Prayers?
Jul
9
comment Why are Ashre and Alenu considered communal prayers?
It may be worth noting that the Mishnah Berurah seems to be following the language of the Ba'er Heitev there, but adding Aleinu as another example.
Jun
26
comment Rambam, Shkiah, and Tzet HaKokhavim
Is there any evidence from the Geonim themselves that they disagreed with Rabbenu Tam's opinion? Where they, or the Rambam, even aware of Rabbenu Tam's opinion?
May
21
comment Why do we refer to Shavuot as the “time of receiving the Torah” when all that occured was hearing the 10 Commandments?
Maybe "receiving the Torah" refers to some other definition of "receiving", i.e. that Shavu'ot marks the accepting of the Torah formally as a binding system of law ("Na'aseh ve-Nishma").
May
20
comment Is there a mitzva to make known the truth of Judaism to non-Jews
Does this included part of the Mitzvah get codified in the Mishneh Torah? If so, where? If not, why?
May
15
revised Is there a mitzva to make known the truth of Judaism to non-Jews
A link to more intelligible and complete version the Rambam's responsum.
May
15
comment Is there a mitzva to make known the truth of Judaism to non-Jews
Re: the Rambam's Responsum: It should be noted that he does not permit teaching Muslims the Mitzvot (and I'd say - by extension - all other non-Christian Gentiles) because they are known to not accept the authenticity of the Written Torah (even though elsewhere he considers them to not be Ovdei Avodah Zarah, whereas Christians are).
May
15
suggested approved edit on Is there a mitzva to make known the truth of Judaism to non-Jews
May
15
comment Is there a mitzva to make known the truth of Judaism to non-Jews
Related: Do we have a right to not be ambassadors?. @Mike see my comment on one of the answers there. I'd add that, even if you say that the verse is directed at the people in general, it is meant that by being Jews (i.e. observing Judaism, Halakhah) they serve as a Or la-Goyim (like in Devarim 4:6-8), not that they have an active obligation to "preach the Word of God" to the nations.
May
11
comment Definition of the Written Law
It may be worth noting that the Mekhilta uses the term Qabalah when referencing Ketuvim as well as Nevi'im: In Bo, Parashah Heh "ve-Aleyhem Meforash ba-Qabalah Gan Na'ul Achoti Khala (Shir ha-Shirim 4:12)" (line 17); in be-Shalach Parashah Beit "Alav Meforash ba-Qabalah ha-Chokhmah Ta'oz le-Chakham ...(Qohelet 7:19)" (line 2) and "... Alehem Meforash ba-Qabalah Yonati be-Chagvei ha-Sela ... (Shir ha-Shirim 2:14)" (line 11).
Apr
23
answered Responsum of Maimonides Regarding Translating Mishne Torah
Apr
17
comment וְהִתְקִין לוֹ מִמֶּנּוּ בִּנְיַן עֲדֵי עַד Is the translation of מִמֶּנּוּ **His** very self or his very self?
(cont.) ... but footnote 10 says "Rashi (ibid.) interprets this as a reference to the creation of woman, who was created from man ('his own self'), and gives him the potential for reproduction ('a structure that will last for all time')" (All bold emphases are mine), suggesting that the capitalized words are referring to Adam ha-Rishon.
Apr
17
comment וְהִתְקִין לוֹ מִמֶּנּוּ בִּנְיַן עֲדֵי עַד Is the translation of מִמֶּנּוּ **His** very self or his very self?
Maybe there is a less common custom of capitalizing the first letter of "his" when it refers to Adam ha-Rishon: When translating the blessings as they appear in Mishneh Torah Hilkhot Ishut 10:3, Eliyahu Touger translates the quoted passage as "who created man in His image, in an image reflecting His likeness; [He brought forth] his form and prepared for him from His own Self a structure that will last for all time", ...
Apr
13
comment Igros K'naos Regarding Rambam
Igerot Qena'ot is part III of the Leipzig 1859 edition of Qovetz Teshuvot ha-Rambam
Apr
9
comment Perush Hamishna of Rambam Online
If you're willing to settle for a non-Qafih translation, the Mishnayot Zekher Chanokh at HebrewBooks (search for "משניות זכר חנוך" there) have the classical translation, and seem to be OCR'd, so you should be able to copy-and-paste from them in a PDF reader (though I haven't tried it myself). At least you'll have a more readable format.