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Feb
17
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
26
awarded  Yearling
Jul
8
comment Is paintballing alowed
no, it requires you throw things out and deny physical realities and sometimes ignore hishtadlut and action.
Jul
7
comment Is paintballing alowed
Do you realize how none of these people's Christian-like opinions on violence match the Tanakh, nor the Gemara? Pathetic!
Jul
7
comment Is paintballing alowed
Great reply Bear!
Jul
5
comment Arabic and Angels
I agree with that, since both Aramaic and Arabic are very close to Hebrew. However, certain words WOULD be understood because they are valid ways to pronounce the Hebrew word. For example, tishma3 in Hebrew and tisma3 in Arabic. Shevet Efraim pronounced shin "sin" always, so this is how they would say it, and we know "s" is one of the two authentic sounds of the letter shin. Ata and inta are hardly different, and the -ak and -ik suffixes aren't really different than -akh, -kha, -ekh, ayikh suffixes in Hebrew. These are just some examples.
Jun
29
comment Amalekim's disguise as Canaanites in Chukas
@ShmuelBrin, because I've been told by my Rav who has a masora. Many Jews, especially from Yehuda and Binyamin shaved their mustaches which is seen in Arabic culture today. Many Jews were nazirim and all kings were, at least from Beit Yehuda. Shaul's "height" was his locks wrapped up around his head. He was praised and "handsome" for being a long-haired nazir, not necessarily because of physical height.
Jun
29
comment Amalekim's disguise as Canaanites in Chukas
An eved Kenaani becomes a Jew when he's freed.
Jun
28
comment Amalekim's disguise as Canaanites in Chukas
Why are you quick to say Kenaanim were black and Amaleqim were white? Israelites were of mixed complections, varying from tribe to tribe in general, as there are differences today. Still, you may find an Ashkenazi darker than a Sefaradi or even a Temani. All Jews usually look semitic, regardless of their eda. I assume it might have been similar back then with Amaleqim and probably even the Kenaanim. And also, the Kenaanim no longer exist and have been absorbed by us.
Jun
21
comment Davening with an Egalitarian Minyan
@AdamMosheh I'm not afraid of offending people if there happen to be problems, or things I am convinced are problems.
Jun
21
awarded  Editor
Jun
20
answered Can someone kindly explain the Malachi 3. 23 -24?
Jun
19
comment בְּתוֹךְ and בְּקֶרֶב are used in different places and both translated “in the midst”; what's the difference?
@DovF That's interesting, I'd never heard that before.
Jun
19
answered בְּתוֹךְ and בְּקֶרֶב are used in different places and both translated “in the midst”; what's the difference?
Jun
18
comment May converts migrate to Israel?
Converting outside of Israel, it would be better for the person just to get a statement from their Rabbi stating they are a member of the community and that he knows them to be Jewish. That will clarify things for the secular state.
Jun
18
comment May converts migrate to Israel?
Halakhically, anyone who is a Jew, Kehen, Lewi, Yisroel, or Jer/convert should move to Israel. The secular State of Israel doesn't even accept many, even Haredi, conversions made within Israel, because they need to have their own people and/or specific groups or authorities to put their stamp of approval on a conversion.
Jun
8
answered Do Jewish people have a collection of books which are the equivelant of the Christian Old Testament?
Jun
8
comment Our Father who art in heaven
I would up this answer a million times if I could.
May
15
comment Sadducees and Karaites - same beliefs?
I thought Essenes did believe in the Oral Torah on some level?
May
15
comment how do you pronounce the soft reish?
@Shemmy I say that because the Hebrew letter has a correct number, sound, color, spiritual power, etc associated with it. Part of using the power of a letter in speech is dependant on pronouncing it correctly. No two Hebrew letters should sound the same. Only in Habbanit are they all different. When I became religious and took this nusah, I had to learn all the letters we don't have in English, or in some other dialects of Hebrew.