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12

The Satmar book, The Rebbe, mentions a different version of that story. The Rebbe is quoted as saying: Had Humphrey spoken to me in support of the Zionist state, it wouldn't have bothered me in the least. We Jews have a Torah which forbids us to have a state during the exile, and therefore we may not ask the Americans to support the state. But a ...


11

Just to clarify the terms: we wouldn't be talking about Herzl's Zionist movement, since that was founded only in 1897, nine years after R. Hirsch's passing. The reference would be to the various "proto-Zionist" groups and ideologies of his time. (As YDK noted, a lot of the leaders of those movements were indeed secular Jews, although it is only fair to note ...


10

No, and I'll explain why: First, as per this list, only 42.5% of world Jewry was in Israel in 2010, so "most" of the Jews are not in Israel. Second, the exile is a function of lost spirituality, not just physical presence. The return to Zion will end the exile when god decides we are on the spiritual level for the proper return. Simply moving there, while ...


7

The rumor is false. The earliest I can find the phrase 'Shimshon HaGibur' goes back to 1831, long before modern zionism or Hertzl. It can be found in the book צמח דוד Google books also shows other phrases such as Shimshon our Hero from books in 1801, but those are in English and not the exact phrase. I would not be surprised to find it occurring even ...


6

No. See the following list from the Rambam of what Mashiach will/must do: In the future, the Messianic king will arise and renew the Davidic dynasty, restoring it to its initial sovereignty. He will build the Temple and gather the dispersed of Israel. Then, in his days, the observance of all the statutes will return to their previous state. We will ...


6

There are no explicit biblical proofs for this. However, there is a fairly famous statement in the גמרא in .כתובות קיא: רבי יוסי ברבי חנינא דאמר ג' שבועות הללו למה אחת שלא יעלו ישראל בחומה ואחת שהשביע הקדוש ברוך הוא את ישראל שלא ימרדו באומות העולם ואחת שהשביע הקדוש ברוך הוא את העובדי כוכבים שלא ישתעבדו בהן בישראל יותר מדאי This דרשא from a פסוק in ...


4

To further Alex's answer: Many forms of proto-Zionism believed that Judaism could only survive with Jews living on their own in their own country; Hirsch fiercely believed that the Jew could live as a good citizen but a foreigner. Hirsch was opposed to most forms of collaboration with non-observant Jews. The teachers of secular studies in his educational ...


4

Firstly, the צמח דוד, referred to in another answer, was actually first printed in 1592. Secondly, the first source I've found is מכילתא דרבי ישמעאל; the term can also be found in סמ"ג, in ספר חסידים, in Maharsha, and in numerous other seforim. On the other hand, the incidence of this term is not particularly frequent. If we replace 'Zionism' with 'Modern ...


3

It's orally reported (I heard it on a Rabbi Rakeffet mp3) that when Rabbi Moshe Feinstein was asked by Bnai Akiva about Hallel on Yom Ha'atzmaut, he replied: "nu, if it's a yomtov for you, then say Hallel; personally I don't." That may be the spirit you'll find here.


3

Rabbi Hershel Schachter points to the Gemara's observation that King Cyrus of Persia, the son of Queen Esther and King Achashverosh, has his years on the throne counted in some accounts from 1 Nissan (like Jewish kings), and in others from 1 Tishrei (like non-Jewish kings). Though he was the king of Persia, as long as he was sympathetic to Jewish causes (he ...


3

According to Rav Kook, and his son, Israel today is considered the quasi kingdom of Israel for many reasons. I list them here in no particular order. With the signing of the Balfour Declaration, the "three oaths" have been fulfilled, and the Nations of the world (like in the time of Cyrus) told the Jewish people that they are to return home and build ...


2

Here is an article about Christian Zionism. With Zionism as you defined it in your question, there is a big difference to being a Zionist and being a Jew. With Wikipedia's definition of Zionism, this is a "movement of Jews and Jewish culture" by definition. Someone could ostensibly be a member of Jewish culture and not a Jew (many children of ...


1

See the writings of Rav Kook for example. Also look up the debates during the abandonment of Gush Katif (Gaza) and the discussions of the Rambam and the Ramban of the mitzvah of settling the land.


1

Not quite, but maybe. First, some corrections. The exile is by no means a function of lost spirituality. Imagine if all Jews lived in Israel, but they were always sinning and otherwise "lost" in spirituality - would you actually say that they are in exile, despite all living in Israel? Indeed, this was the condition of the Jews throughout much of ...



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