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The Shulchan Aruch in Orach Chaim Siman 199 Paragraph 7 says: שולחן ערוך אורח חיים סימן קצט:ז נשים מזמנות לעצמן - רשות. אבל כשאוכלות עם האנשים, חייבות ויוצאות בזמון שלנו. Women can do a Zimun alone. It is a רשות (optional). But if they are with three men, then the women are obligated (with the men), and a man would lead. The Beiur Halacha quoted below ...


9

It is said in name of Rav Chaim Soloveitchik that when we say Elokenu it makes the Zimun into a Davar Shebikedusha. That is the reason why some people stand when they say Elokenu, since according to some the Minhag is to stand during a Davar Shebikedusha. This Minhag is not universal. Sefardim do not stand by Kaddish in many cases.


8

The Baal Hatanya, in his Shulchan Aruch (190:4), states that the cup can be passed to a child. (In footnote כז there it is noted that this is by analogy with various other cases where this may be done, such as havdalah on Motzaei Shabbos of the Nine Days, or a bris on Tisha B'Av.) The reason, he says, is: לפי שגם על המברך לא חל החיוב כלל שלא חייבוהו אלא ...


5

(Based on Shulchan Aruch OC 196 with Mishna Berura) One who ate non kosher food when not permitted to do so (ie not in a case of danger to life) should not say a bracha before or after eating and does not combine to form a zimmun. The Mishna Berura adds that some achronim hold that if it was eaten beshogeg (accidentally) then one could say a after bracha ...


5

See the excellent article here regarding the proper nussach of zimmun. The highlights are: that the introductory bit (everything before Nevarech she'achalnu mishelo) is based on a ruling of the Zohar quoted in the Magen Avraham quoted in the Mishna Berura (OC 192 sk 2) and in the Aruch HaShulchan (OC 192:2) which says that every "davar shebikusha" needs a ...


4

When there is a Zimmun, what is supposed to happen is the leader recites the entire Bentching aloud on the group's behalf and everyone else listens with the intent to fulfill their obligation and replies Amen at the relevant places. If one is unsure of his ability to pay attention to the leader the whole time (this is common), he should recite in an ...


4

Voice over the internet is halachically considered an echo. Brachot and prayer can not be said over the internet, nor can you listen to a shofar blast over the phone etc. (source http://www.chaburas.org/ramkol.html ) That would be a reason to not do a mizuman over video-chat. As to the question of if you are "allowed" to do a mezuman over an echo / video ...


4

Many thanks to Menachem who, in a comment on the question, gave references to some of the following, which led me also to the others: The Avudraham (Abudirham) says that only the leader of a zimun (the m'zamen) says it, and has a different nusach (wording): Baruch hu uvaruch zichro l'olme ad. (Many thanks to Menachem for finding this!) The Tur, OC 192 (and ...


3

If the food is probably kosher, but just doesn't have kosher certification, then that's not a problem and should not affect these halachos in any way. If it was actually treif, then one should not say birchas hamazon on it (and obviously there's no zimmun). The gemara in sanhedrin discusses saying a bracha on stolen food and quotes the passuk "בוצע ברך נאץ ...


3

According to the Tzitz Eliezer, one can fulfill the mitzvot of reading the Torah, blowing the shofar, and hearing the megillah via telephone or radio. See his famous tshuva (8:11) http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14507&st=&pgnum=53 His permission is if there is no other way or in a case (such as a large hospital) where it is not practical to ...


3

1) In this first scenario, since Ashkenazim cannot include a child for a zimun, then clearly even in this case he cannot use a child. But DinOnLine.org here brings a different scenario, and says: If an Ashkenazi child eats with two Sephardi men, the child can join the zimun and answer together with the men (Vezos Ha-Berachah p. 127). 2)With regard to ...


2

Dan's answer addresses the salutation. The invitation to bless, however, might also do well to be adjusted. While in modern Hebrew (and, indeed, for a very long time, historically) the feminine, plural, first person call to bless is the same as the masculine (נברך). However, a more archaic form of the word (and thus, perhaps, a more correspondingly ...


2

The Talmud (Brachot 20b) debates if women are obligated to bentch biblically or rabbinically. It doesn't come to a clear conclusion. The Rambam (Brachot 5:1) and others rule it is a doubt and this is how the Shulchan Aruch (OC 186:1) concludes. Rashi (ibid. sv. או דרבנן) suggests that the Talmud considered that women might be exempt biblically from bentching ...


2

Perhaps by Zimmun you are referring to the concern that the group will not hear the leader. Recall that Zimmun originally meant that the leader said all the blessings out loud and everyone fulfilled their obligation by listening. Thus if you couldn't hear the leader in a big room then you did not fulfill the biblical obligation of bentching. (Note also that ...


2

Ba'al HaTania (Shulchan Aruch Harav OC 193:10) states that חרש ואלם if they are not shote can be added to a zimun of 10, if they are not rov but not to zimun of 3 because there you need every one to answer. However, ביאור הלכה in OC 193 brings a ברכת אברהם saying that one can not be motzi another in birkat hamazon if the listener does not understand. In a ...


2

Shulchan Aruch (200:1) [based on Brachos 45b] discuses a case where three people were eating together, and two of them finished and wished to bench, while the third still wished to continue eating. The Halacha is that the third person is obligated to interrupt his eating in order to participate in the zimun, and then afterwards continues eating. In the event ...



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