Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Yes, there are many who still do (though unfortunately a minority today). To name a few, Fifth Avenue Synagogue says the Musaf piyutim as does OZ on West Side (or at least they did last time I was there for Parshas Shkalim about 9 years ago), one or more of the Young Israels in the NY area do (I forgot which one but I know that at least one does it). In ...


7

In the terminology used in the Mishnah, the Biblical shekel is called a sela, and the former half-shekel is called a shekel. (Examples are legion - see, for example, Shekalim 1:6: הנותן סלע ונוטל שקל - one who gives a sela and asks for a shekel as change.) So it's quite correct to say that we will give a shekel.


5

Congregation Etz Chayim in Toledo, Ohio says them.


5

Rambam (Seder Tefillos Mikol Hashanah) calls it מנהג פשוט, a widespread custom, to say these paragraphs (his version is different than ours, but it's recognizable). So it doesn't sound like it goes back to the Anshei Knesses Hagedolah; perhaps it's from the Geonim. (It appears in Siddur R. Amram Gaon, but there are lots of later interpolations there, so I ...


4

Perhaps Miriam is alluded to in the verse יִחַד לֵב וְגָל אֶבֶן מִפִּי בְאֵר מַיִם and also in the verse קוֹרֵא וּמַזֶּה טָהֳרַת *מַיִם ר*וּחַק מֵעַם פַּחַז כַּמָּיִם Another thought: When Miriam was Nifteres it says that the water continued in the Zechus of Moshe who was still living. ...


4

I don't know for certain, but based on old machzorim, I have a guess. Once upon a time, in piyyutim said responsively, the chazzan said the first phrase, and the kahal answered with the rest of the line. (This fits the pattern not only of Ha'ochez B'yad but also Attah Hu Elokenu and L'Kel Orech Din. In an inverted way, it also fits Melech Elyon.) So as ...


4

Possibly the difference has to do with the structure of the piyutim in each case. The halachah is that you're allowed to add any kind of requests, even private ones, in the middle berachos of Shemoneh Esrei (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 119:1), and you can add public ones even in the first and last ones (ibid. 112:1). In either case, though, the addition has ...


3

I think the paytan was working the other way. He had a list of holy 'shepherds' in who's zchus we beseach water, he filled in the stanzas with something about water concerning them all. This is very apparent from some of the forced associations. The one about Avraham is all poetic and nothing literal. Mentioning Moshe being thrown in the water seems strange. ...


3

This is not a particularly satisfying answer, but I always assumed it was because she's female. While there exist some rare references to women elsewhere in Jewish liturgy, it's far more common practice to leave them out. (For example, I was quite struck that the imahot are included during yizkor -- it seemed unfamiliar after so many daily mentions of ...


3

An interesting example is the Yerushalmi shuls in Israel, who follow the customs of Tamidei HaGra. (I think the Tukachinsky luach mentions this custom.) They don't say Yotzrot or Krovot during the brachot of Shma or Shmone Esrei, but after Shacharit (and before taking out the Torah) they say the piyyutim.


3

In Ashkenaz today [the situation was different in different communities in the past]: Me'ora - Before or chodosh. Ahava - different minhogim, either before v'keiravtanu or before l'hodos lecho. Maarivim Short piyut before end of first berocho, Same with second; long piyut before בגילה ברינה בשמחה רבה ואמרו כלם, short piyut before זה צור ישענו פצו פה ...


3

I do not know about Teaneck, but the following is a list of shuls that I know about that say ma'arovith in the New York area. All these minyonim say the Ashkenaz (German) version printed in the Rödelheim machzor. Ma'arovith is recited on all yomim tovim with the exception of Rosh haShonoh and Yom Kippur. According to the Frankfurt, A.M. custom they are ...


3

All the shules under Rav Teitz in Elizabeth, New Jersey have said all Yotzros for over seventy years


3

Seems the Yekkis have http://www.data-genie.com/ashkenaz/home.php?n=Main.Minhogim


3

In Seder Avodas Yisrael by the ריביא''ד (R' Seligman Baer) זכר צדיק לברכה, there is a big Yotzros Section. For a quite a lot of the days with Yotzros, it includes a piyut in the third Brachah (Ahavah), examples include the six Shabbosos after Pesach, the Shabbos after Shavuos, Shabbos VaYeira, Shlach-Lecha, Chukas, Nachamu and Eikeiv.


2

The Nussach HaGra as practiced by the Perushim (Talmidim of the Vilna Gaon in Jerusalem) as well as many Litvishe (Haredi) Yeshivot in Israel do not say this - nor almost any other Piyut (except on Rosh HaShana and Yom Kippour). Their Tefilat-Geshem consists of a few snippets of the original, and is said before the silent Mussaf on Shmini Atzeret. You can ...


2

I certainly don't know "why," but the flow of many piyyutim goes Yotzer-Ofan-Zulat. But not all! See, for example, the piyyutim for Shabbat Chol Hamoed Pesach, where the flow is Yotzer-Ofan-Meorah-Ahavah-Zulat-Geulah. (These piyyutim are in the Rinnat Yisrael machzor, for example, but the ArtScroll machzor doesn't have the Meorah or Ahavah, with a note ...


2

I have heard that Ner Yisrael says the Mussaf for Shkalim and Hachodesh as do many shuls that follow the yeshiva's minhagim. Anyone have first-hand experience? I also heard from a number of people (but again, I have not been there to confirm) that Lakewood says many of the piyutim for Arba Parshios. Anyone know exactly which ones they say? I know that ...


1

Hendon United Synagogue in the UK says them. That is the shul I have grown up going to.


1

I one time heard, although I do not recall the source, that we say it whenever there is an interruption between the Bracha of Mechayei Maisim and Kedusha, and we do not say it when there is no interruption between the Bracha of Mechayei Maisim and Kedusha. Thus the times you mentioned that it is not said, there is no interruption at that point and therefore ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible