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21

Just to note, Rambam (Mishna Torah; Hil. Melachim 12:2) writes that one should not over-contemplate the events that are to come about with the redemption, for the prophecies are intentionally vague and no one will know for certain their meaning until they come to be realized. Even the Rabbis of the Talmud only said about the redemption and the Messiah what ...


13

Chizkuni asks this and offers two answers: The reason the Egyptians were circumcised was because of the hunger of the famine. Yosef however was rich and therefore the only reason he would circumcise himself would be if he was Jewish. Although all the Egyptians were in fact circumcised, the brothers were not aware of this this and would recognize Yosef on ...


12

Pirkei D'Rebbi Eliezer (Chapter 38) says that when Reuven returned and found the pit empty he accused the brothers of killing Yosef. They then told him that they sold him instead.


11

Jacob had twelve sons, and on spiritual matters, we count those twelve. With Levi as one and Joseph as one. (That's for instance what you'd find on the High Priest's decision breastplate.) On financial/land matters, however, Levi did his own thing, and Joseph got a double portion as his sons Ephraim and Menashe. For instance, there were spaces for twelve ...


11

The Maharal (Gur Aryeh ibid) explains that the Gemara which says that a person will surely die in a pit full of snakes and scorpions is only when it is full of snakes and scorpions, but this pit just had a few. The Ohr HaChaim explains that the brothers felt Yosef was deserving of death because he had testified falsely about them to their father in matters ...


11

Rashi doesn't address it, but other commentators do. The Ibn Ezra, Rashbam, Sforno, and Chezkoni all agree on this: Yaakov was "legally blind" to the point that he could not see any details, but was able to see that there was a person there. This is actually similar to personal experience. My mother is nearly like this: she can discern shapes, but no ...


9

According the Chida, who says it in the name of the Rokeach (Brought in Vedibarta Bam): According to an opinion in the Gemara (Gittin 43a), when one sells a Jew as a slave to a non-Jew, he is fined to redeem him for up to 100 times his value. In the Torah we find a slave to be valued at 30 silver pieces (Shemot 21:32). Since Yosef was sold as a slave to ...


9

Imrei Baruch says the following answers to your question. A: Chizkuni - The brothers drank since at that moment there was no Gezaira (decree) yet for Stam Yainom (non-Jewish wine). B: Medrosh Talpios: They drank out of "Aimas Hamalchus" (fear of the king) C: He goes on to say that the brothers considered themselves as Bnai Noach and thus together with ...


8

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l has a different take on it. In his talk of Shabbos Parshas Vayeishev 5734 (Sichos Kodesh 5734 1:201-202), he explains that Yosef told over these dreams precisely because he hoped to use them to defuse his brothers' jealousy toward him. Previous dreams recorded in the Torah were basically meant to be taken at face value. For ...


8

פסיקתא רבתי‎ 3:45 has it that it was engineered by Yosef as such, so Yaakov would never say "by the way Yosef, how exactly did you um, get lost when you went looking for your brothers, and wind up in Egypt?"


8

Brothers Ask For Forgiveness: Bereshit 50:16-18 Yosef does not explicitly forgive them. Instead he tells them it was all G-d's plan: Bereshit 50:19-21 Rabbeinu Bechaye says that because Yosef never forgave the brothers the 10 Martyrs were killed.


8

S'forno says it would be inappropriate for Yosef to approach the king while dressed in mourning.


7

Seems to be here (end of the first column and beginning of the second, ד"ה ענין). Although, if I'm understanding him correctly, it's not that if he had held back there wouldn't have been any further animosity on the brothers' part, just that they would have been able to complete all of the tikkunim that were needed. (Maybe that amounts to the same thing?)


7

Me'am Loez says (citing Zohar Chadash, Eichah) that R. Eliezer is counted among these ten Sages. He was arrested and nearly sentenced to death, but was miraculously spared (Avodah Zarah 16b-17a); he thus corresponds to Reuven, who played a part in the whole drama but wasn't actually involved in the sale.


7

Rashi (46:34): כי תועבת מצרים כל רעה צאן: לפי שהם להם אלהות: are abhorrent to the Egyptians: Because they (the sheep) are their gods. The Siftei Chachamim (46:34) (in his second answer) gives a different twist to the word "To'evah", and explains Rashi a little differently. He says that Yosef is telling his brothers that the Egyptians greatly ...


7

I have heard that it is to give us strength in Torah while living in exile, just as Ephraim and Menashe were able to grow up Jewish in Egypt.


7

"main reason" ? that would depend on whose answer is being used. off the top of my head , 3 reasons given are The 2 brothers represented the accomplished Learner (Ephraim) and the accomplished BusinessMan , both of which are needed for a thriving nation. Ephraim represents the one who stirs up the nest, ie: trouble maker. Throughout Navi, Ephraim is the ...


7

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l mentioned this idea in one of his talks (Shabbos Chanukah 5734 - Sichos Kodesh 5734 1:211-212, adapted into English by others). He also adds that it wasn't just that Yosef noticed that they were upset - they probably were on all the other days too, having been demoted and thrown into jail - but that they were upset more than usual, ...


7

Midrash Hagadol (to Gen. 48:1) cites an opinion that Osnas, Yosef's wife, urged him to do so: "I have heard that anyone who receives a blessing from a tzaddik is as if he received it from the Divine Presence. Take your sons so that he can bless them!"


7

Rav Hirsch says that we can't be sure of the true reason, but he suggests that (along the lines of his general approach to the story of the Sale of Joseph) perhaps Shechem, evoking memories of protecting Dinah and family unity, awakened feelings of fraternity, which they did not wish to stir up, and Dotan evoked some (unknown) association with justice, as ...


6

Read this Shi'ur by Menachem Leibtag. http://www.tanach.org/breishit/vayesh/vayeshs1.htm Here's a teaser for it: "After throwing your brother into a pit to die, would you be able to sit down to eat? Yosef's brothers did, as the Torah tells us! However, the Torah does not tell us if they sat near the pit, listening to Yosef's screaming and pleading, or if ...


6

The Bavli, Sota 13, says (if I understand it correctly):Come, see how beloved commands were to Moshe rabenu, for all the Jews were busy with spoils and he was busy with commands [specifically, filling the promise of taking Yosef's bones, see the beginning of B'shalach —msh210], as it says "a wisehearted person will take commands...".And how did Moshe rabenu ...


6

Idol worshipers would buy and sell their gods. For example, Terach, Avraham's father, owned a god-market. It therefore follows that when the Egyptians were faced with starvation, they brought all their possessions, including their gods, to trade in for food. We see this from the following passage in Beraishis Rabsi (p. 217): אינו אומר וישמעו אל יוסף ...


6

The Sedor Hadoros (2217) brings several opinions: The Sefer Hayashar (Parshas Vayeshev) and Seder Olam both maintain he was only in Potifar's house for a year, and spent the next twelve years on prison. The Yefeh Toar (on Midrash Rabba Parshas Behaloshcha and Vayera) questions this, and the Tzemach Dovid suggests he worked for Potifar for 11 years, and spent ...


6

Rav Chaim Yaakov Goldvicht ZT"L (Rosh Yeshiva of Kerem B'Yavneh) had an interesting explanation. For 20 years he was bothered by the question - for years, Yosef served as viceroy of Egypt, and sent no message to his father to tell him he was alive, and made no attempt to contact him. Why not? He gave the following explanation: Yosef thought that his ...


6

The Ramban is bothered by this as well, and makes the question stronger - the shevatim were not born that far apart from each other and really all of them could be a son of old age. Rather he explains it as a son who serves the father in his old age, not who was born in the father's old age. The other brothers were off shepherding (and Binyomin was ...


6

Your idea that Yaakov does not favor Binyamin as highly because he is a reminder of Rachel's death is suggested by the Chizkuni: ואם תאמר הרי בנימין בן זקונים יותר, אלא אין אהבת בנימין קשורה בלבו של יעקב כאהבתו של יוסף, לפי שכשילדתו אמו מתה Other commentators address this question as well: R' Yosef Bechor Shor and Ralbag opine that Yosef is called בן ...


6

R' Shimshon Pinkus published a sefer called ברכות בחשבון (that's breichos, not brachos) which goes through the song Mi Yodeya and explains the philosophical significance of each one and how it fits in to the chain of the song. His thesis is that the words of the refrain are not מה אחד מי יודע - "who knows what there is one of" - but rather "אחד מי יודע" - ...


6

B'reishis Rabba (90:6) indicates that Yosef's decree was designed to provide the Egyptians not only with life in this world, via physical sustenance, but with life in the World to Come which they could merit via circumcision. The Y'fei To'ar commentary (ad loc. and on 91:5) explains this by saying that the Egyptians were steeped in sexual immorality, of ...



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