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8

This is a matter of idiom. "Yom Tov" while literally meaning "Good Day" is the idiom for a day that is "good" because of the spiritual level of that day. Thus, when spoken as a single phrase, the translation is similar to the English original "Holy Day" which we now use as "holiday". The Yiddish "Yumtuf" or "Yuntif" shows that it is used a a single meaning. ...


7

The reason that we keep 2 days on all festivals outside of Israel is because originally it was a doubt whether the new month had been declared, and word did not reach far enough for them to know by the middle of the month. Even once the calendar was set, they maintained the minhag of their predecessors (Beitza 4b). The Ba'al HaMe'or to Beitza 5a explains ...


7

Great question! This is part of a major machlokes rishonim in maseches beitzah. The Ran in the beginning of the 3rd chapter says that really all melachos are allowed on a Biblical level, but the sages forbade melachos that are generally done for a long time, as harvesting is generally done on an entire field, not just what you need for that meal. ...


5

The answer to your first question about the meaning of the expression "sowing" can be found in Rashi in the gemara Bechoros 22a (fruits of my learning in this program!): One puts the vessel containing the impure water in the mikveh until the water of the mikveh passes over the mouth of the vessel and makes contact with the water that is in the vessel. ...


5

The Rambam (Hil. Tefilin 4:10) disagrees with you. He says: וכן שבתות וימים טובים, אינן זמן תפילין, שנאמר "והיו לך לאות" (ראה שמות יג,ט), ושבתות וימים טובים הן עצמן אות. The Rambam says clearly that Yom Tov is an אות and therefor does not warrant putting on Tefillin. The Rambam's source is a Gemara (Menachot 36): ר´ עקיבא אומר יכול יניח אדם תפילין ...


3

Halachafortoday sources the Mishna Brurah 320:56 : ‏(נו) מותר - וכן מותר ליתן יין אדום בתוך יין לבן ואע״פ שמתאדם [ואפילו אם מכוין לכתחלה לעשות מראה בהמאכל או בהמשקה ג״כ מסתברא דאין להחמיר כן נראה מהפמ״ג ולפי מה שכתב בנ״א נכון למנוע מזה] ומ״מ אין רשאי לעשות מראה ביי״ש ודבש שיקנו ממנו [פמ״ג ע״ש טעמו וגם בלא״ה הוא עובדא דחול] וכ״ש שלא להשים סממנים ...


2

Rabbi Sir Jonathan Sacks, in his Siddur commentary, addresses this question along similar lines as the Levush quoted by Alex: The Leader begins at different points on different holy days of the year. On Shabbat he begins with "He inhabits eternity," emphasizing creation; on Yom Tov, with "God - in Your absolute power," laying stress on God as He acts in ...


2

The Lubavitcher Rebbe says that it is possible that Yom Tov Sheni will continue to be celebrated because it has been done for so many generations. Even though the calendar will be replaced with the Sanhedrin declaring the month based on testimoney, it will still not be technically necessary to keep two days anywhere, as everyone will know right away when the ...


2

Just to add, the opinion of the Chacham Tzvi (167) and a number of other authorities is exactly this, that since the custom of the communities outside of Isreal to keep two days only applies outside of Isreal (for if the entire community would move to Israel they would only observe one day) so too a person who is visting Israel only observes one day. ...


2

This question is discussed by R. Henkin in Bnei Banim vol 3 #2. In his teshuva he provides more sources. The biggest potential pitfall is cooking/preparing food that will only be used on the next halachic day. Consumption of all cooked dishes would need to begin before bein hashmashos according to the Pri Megadim M"Z 503:1 (cited in the Biur Halacha ad ...


2

Shmot (Ex) 12:16 - "No manner of work shall be done in them, except that which every man must eat, that only may be done of you." that is the source of the statement that allows food preparation on Yom Tov. As for WHY the Torah was more lenient on Yom Tov than on Shabbat, esp. with regard to food preparations, I'm surmising on this. Two ideas - 1) On ...


2

In Munkatch the custom is to say just Yom-Tov and not 'Git' Yom-Tov. The Rebbe of Munkatch used to say that Git Yom Tuv is one of three redundant expressions in yiddish: גוט יום טוב מים אחרונים וואסער אונגארישער נער


1

Additionally, Pesach Mitzrayim is refered to in the Torah as an ot, and as all the yamim tovim are connected to the Exodus, there's a sort of transitive operation by which the others can be considered otot as well.


1

The Rambam never permitted cooking Nevelah meat with milk. He only permitted deriving benefit from the mixture. Cooking Nevelah meat with milk is still prohibited (Maachalot Asurot 9:6).


1

Tosfos agrees that boneh is assur min hatorah when it is not for yom tov. As such, there is a maris ayin to carry a ladder since an observer may very well suspect the ladder carrier of fixing a roof for a non yom tov need.


1

Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach zt'l allowed adding concentrated syrup to water or seltzer on shabbos, saying "this is no different than anyone who mixes water with wine or hot water with tea essence."


1

The most important part of the perush of the Raav is: ה"ק - הכי קאמר That is to say that the Mishna is NOT explained according the simple pshat. The simple pshat is the Hava Amina of Abaye in Beitza 15a - this corresponds to your 2nd pshat. However the Maskana of Gemara is הכי קאמר , and corresponds [roughly] to your 1st pshat. Raav and Kehati follow the ...


1

The rule the mishna gives relates to the state of an object, but specific objects will be prohibited regardless of their state. Unfinished items may not be sent, while finished items may generally be sent, and the rule for determining if an item is completed is if you can use it as-is. Spiked sandals are something which are specifically prohibited as an item ...


1

If it has been turned off by a shabbat clock (timer), I don't see any problem with unplugging it, as one is merely preventing it from turning on again.



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