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7

According to Alexander Beider's Handbook of Ashkenazic Given Names (which, though well-researched, I haven't found to be entirely accurate for some individual names), the name Tsherne is borrowed from the Czech Christian name "Crne" (and Cernice, Crnohna, etc.) which comes from the word černa, meaning "black." Jews took the Czech name with them as they ...


6

OK, I may have enough of an idea to offer an answer. I think the panel in the upper right is supposed to say כינור שפילט, like "harpist" or something in Yiddish. The upper middle seems to say something about a harp. The upper left says מאנדלן, Yiddish for almonds. I think the lower right might be א ליד, "a song." The lower middle says "baa..." I don't know ...


6

According to Alexander Beider's Handbook of Ashkenazic Given Names, Dov didn't become a name in "the vernacular life" until the 20th century. "Jews called Dov in Hebrew sources were actually named Ber in their everyday life." Ber, on the other hand, comes form the German Bero which has been known since the 8th century among non-Jews. Beider's theory is ...


5

Rav Mirsky in his first volume of Hegyonei Halacha has an interesting article on Ameilah shel Torah and includes the virtues of a bear. In speaking about how important 'toil' in learning is (rather than rote learning) he brings a Radak on Hosea (13:8): .אֶפְגְּשֵׁם כְּדֹב שַׁכּוּל, וְאֶקְרַע סְגוֹר לִבָּם; וְאֹכְלֵם שָׁם כְּלָבִיא, חַיַּת הַשָּׂדֶה ...


4

I found this on this site, but I don't know what they are quoting. I thought it was worth posting as an answer anyways: מקור נוסף:‏ ."dark" שם יידי שמשמעו‏ מקור סלאבי. ביידיש נכתב: טשערנא.‏ שם זה ניתן כדי להרחיק רוחות רעות ולהגן על התינוק, לפעמים לאחר מות אח של התינוק. המטרה היא לתת לילד שם "מכוער" ואולי כך הרוחות לא יחשבו שהוא ...


4

It literally means "a joyful Purim". The words "I wish you" that should accompany it are missing but if you want to say it in proper English then "I wish you a joyful Purim" would do the job. Google Translate has "A happy Purim". Maybe you need to cast lots to decide which to use. (Purim means "lots").


3

I went looking for instances of "hamentash" (המן־טאַש) in Sholom Aleichem stories because I wanted to see it used in a sentence as singular and plural. In the story "Two Shalachmones or A Purim Scandal" the word is used 12 times, but every single usage is singular. It is consistently spelled המן־טאַש or "hamentash". You can find the first instance on page ...


2

YMMV, but the Previous Lubavitcher Rebbe wrote that there was a "Pierre Louis" (an assimilated Jew from France) who visited Harki. The town was Chassidic, and it happened that one of the townsmen visited the Baal Shem Tov in the interim. The Baal Shem Tov then instructed Rabbi Nissan to go to Pierre Louis and tell him that he was of Jewish descent; that ...



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