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The Maharal in Gevuros Hashem ch. 52 explains this line in two ways. In his first explanation, he writes that the point is not that Hashem would have / could have only taken us out then, but rather that no one else could have taken us out, whether then or at some later point. This is because the Exodus was the creation of the Jewish nation from potential ...


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An interesting point that I have heard actually considers what happened in the United States after the civil war. American Blacks became "free", but examine what happened in the next hundred years. After the slaves became free we had the rise of Jim Crow laws, segregation, the attempt to live in the world of racial prejudice, the start of the modern Civil ...


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1) Perhaps it means the culturally we would still be enslaved to Pharaoh. We would be entrenched in the Egyptian values, their ethical and philosophical beliefs. We would be assimilated into the Egyptian society never to break away if not for God taking us out and providing us with a new outlook on life. 2) Perhaps it is not telling us a historical ...


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Ramba"m (Maimonedes) does explain quite a bit of this concept of free will as providedin the various links, above. A somewhat straight-forward answer is in the Chumash itself at the beginning of parshat Bo. "Go to Pharoah, for I have hardened his heart and the heart of his serbants SO THAT I MAY EXPOUND MY SIGNS UPON EGYPT. AND SO THAT YOU SHALL TELL IN ...


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There are a number of answers ranging from strengthening Pharaoh so that he could withstand the plagues, to the difference in language showing that Pharaoh hardened his own heart at first and G0d only did that later after Pharaoh had reached the level of requiring punishment, ... Check out Hardened Hearts: Some Explanations to see some of them ...


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The Haggadah does not say that we would still all be slaves today, nor does it say that we would be slaves. It says: “And if the Holy One, Blessed be He, had not taken our forefathers out of Egypt, behold, we (see below) and our children and our children’s children (three generations only) would have been subjugated (but not slaves) to Pharaoh in ...


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The Da'as Zkeinim (and the Chizkuni) at the beginning of Parshas Noach addresses this issue in a different context - The posuk says תמים by Noach, and the Midrash says (Bereishis Rabba 30:8) that anyone described as such lived to an age the which is the multiple of 7 (full שבוע). Noach's 950 do not add (or divide) up. He answers that he lived this amount ...


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Seder Olam Rabba (written by Rabbi Yose Ben Chalafta in the 2nd century) chapter 3 says that they took 12 months - based on the starting point of your discussion, namely the gathering of the straw, which he writes is normal to do in Iyar (not in the fall). The Mishna in Eduyos 2:10 says the same: משפט המצריים, שנים עשר חודש The judgement of the ...



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