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6

To first clarify, even though lying is usually frowned upon, I'm pretty sure that, at least ethically speaking, there's no reason to frown upon lying to Pharaoh in this situation if it was necessary to save the Jews. The question being dealt with here is why was this deception necessary - couldn't God have saved them without the lie? Thanks to this shiur, ...


6

The question is dealt with here A brief summary of the article: Why is it difficult to “tear” the Red Sea ? A medrash says that Moshe who saw all the plagues of Egypt, asked Hashem, You have set a border to the sea and You have sworn never to tear it up” The Maharal explains tearing the Red Sea breaks all the rules of natural ...


5

In Shemos 5:3, Moshe introduces his request: נלכה נא דרך שלשת ימים במידבר ונזבחה ליהוה Now let us go on a three day journey in the desert and sacrifice to the Lord our God


4

Pesachim 118a quotes Rav Shizvi in the name of R' Elazar ben Azarya "קשין מזונותיו של אדם כקריעת ים סוף" and Brachos 58a says "במתניתא תנא משמיה דר' עקיבא


4

Rabbi Shimshon Rafael Hirsch on the same usage in Ki Sisa 32:7 says that at this point they did not act or regard themselves as Hashem's nation but as people who had been brought out by Moshe. Many of the meforshim state that the original intent of the calf was not avodas zarah but as a symbol for Moshe. Rashi, among others, states that the Eirev Rav were ...


4

Rashi explains that moshe asked what the merit of the Jews are that they will be saved from Egypt. Hashem answered that their merit is that they will receive the torah. So this was not intended as a proof.


3

the Ba'al Ha'agada writes, chayav adam l'rois es atzmo, k'ilu hu yatza m'mitrayim. there is an obligation to view oneself as if he were leaving mitrayim. it isn't a commerotaion of the past, rather it is reliving the moment. rav yerucham levovitz in da'as torah parshat tzav explains that the ability of imagination and thought is in fact a tool to create, and ...


3

Ramban (13th century) famously writes in his commentary to Torah at the end of parshat Bo that through commemorating the miraculous events in Egypt we reaffirm the fundaments of God's knowledge of and involvement with the world. יצוה אותנו שנעשה תמיד זכרון ואות לאשר ראו עינינו, ונעתיק הדבר אל בנינו, ובניהם לבניהם, ובניהם לדור אחרון. והחמיר מאד בענין... ...


3

The laws of tum'ah were not given until the Torah was given on Shavuos (or possibly later, depending on whether all mitzvos were given on Shavuos). Thus, even people who touched a corpse would not have been tamei and were able to bring the Korban Pesach at the correct time. Note that in the verses about the laws of the first Korban Pesach, there is no ...


3

It shows up in תוספתא ברכות ב:א. I cannot find an earlier source.


2

A variety of explanatons are provided in Rishonim. Some, e.g. Adubraham write that kiddush never asserts hat Shabbos is a rememberance of the exodus but rather that it is the foremost of the holy occurrences (festivals) which are (themselves) a rememberance of the exodus. Ramban suggests that we dont mean that Shabbos is a commemoration of the exodus, but ...


2

R' Hirsch understands the אות to be referring back to the previous point - Moshe said (vs. 11) "Who am I that I should ... bring the Children of Israel out from Egypt?" Hashem answered, This that you have asked "Who am I..." is exactly the qualification to be the best messenger. You sense that you lack any qualification for this mission, and that itself ...


2

The general point is made here in a Haggada printed in 1907. It doesn't give its source, and doesn't specifically point out how the 9 months fits. Regarding pregnancy, specifically, this is in the Talmud Sotah 11b, although I suppose the emphasis on "carrying pregnancies to term", as opposed to just working to have babies, could be a bit of editorializing by ...


2

The Maharal says (Gevuras Hashem 61) that all Jews for all time were directly affected by being redeemed from Egypt, even though there are subsequent exiles, the exodus makes every person alive today inherently a free person, and any subsequent enslavement is only temporary and external. So the events of the exodus have a direct continued effect on our ...


1

See YU's Empowered Learning by Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks. His message is that “destiny created history” and as the Ibn Ezra says to Exodus 13:8 “And thou shalt tell thy son in that day, saying: It is because of that which the L-rd did for me when I came forth out of Egypt. והַגּדָתּ לבְנָך בּיּוֹם ההוּא לאמר בֲּעבוּר זה עשָֹה ה' לי בֵּצאתי ...


1

Both, really. The Ibn Ezra is saying that now that the Egyptians got destroyed, there was no longer a chance of the Egyptians coming to reclaim them as escaped slaves. Possibly, before they viewed themselves as still captives, because of the Egyptian threat looming over their heads, but now the threat was gone.


1

This was in order for Hashem to fulfill his promise to Avraham found in parshas Lech Licha chapter 15 verse 14. וגם את הגוי אשר יעבדו דן אנכי ואחרי כן יצאו ברכש גדול.


1

Was Moshe decieving Pharoh, or was the original “Exodus” from Egypt meant to be temporary? Exodus 3:18 And they shall hearken to thy voice: and thou shalt come, thou and the elders of Israel, unto the king of Egypt, and ye shall say unto him, The LORD G-d of the Hebrews hath met with us: and now let us go, we beseech thee, three days' journey into ...


1

You may need to glean some insight to the connection from Ramban's explanation on Shmot 3:11. It's lengthy, but an important part of what he states is that regarding B'nai Yisra'el and Moses leadership, there was a sequence and cause / effect. Ramba"n states that B'nai Yisra'el would listen to Moses about the concept of being freed from Pharoah and slavery. ...


1

A fascinating answer I once heard: During Krias Yam Suf, the Jews went in and out on the same side. In other words, they walked in an arc. The Medrash also says that each tribe walked through its own "tunnel" - so there were parallel happenings of Krias Yam Suf. As a result, those in the inside of the arc had a much shorter Krias Yam Suf than those in the ...


1

I once heard an interesting explanation of this by Rabbi Uziel Milevsky zt'l regarding marriage. (he didn't explain about the livelihood version of that statement) Basically he says that the most difficult barrier in marriage is selfishness - each spouse focuses on his/her own self. The analogy to selfishness in the physical world is gravity, where each ...


1

This is a matter of how can Bnei Yisrael merit Hashem "intervening" in the "natural" world to do things. Of course, Hashem can do anything He wants, but it is a matter of people seeing the nissim and meriting Hashgacha Pratis. Kriyas Yam Suf is the "breaking" of natural law as a one time event. Thus, people can see the miracle that is being done. As it says, ...


1

I think that if Dr. Ernest Goldschmidt's hypopthesis regarding the דיינו poem is correct - that it was composed during the glory days of the temple, seeing as it's the poem's concluding theme - then it might be the oldest source. A thought of mine on the origins of the phrase: maybe it's based on the Pasuk in Tehillim 136: "לגוזר ים סוף לגזרים", but since ...



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