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9

"The tribe of Ephraim miscalculated the time of the deliverance of the children of Israel from Egypt, and left the country thirty years before the appointed time. They were met by a hostile host of Philistines, who offered them battle, in which the Ephraimites lost 300,000 men (according to Pesi?., 180,000; according to Pir?e R. El., 200,000). Their bones ...


7

I collected a few links that discuss this question, with several different suggestions for an answer. For example: The Rosh says that only those who did not believe in the Exodus died in the plague of darkness. The Chatam Sofer says that they were kept alive so that the miracle of the ground opening up will be done especially for them. See more in the links ...


7

My favorite commentator when it comes to understanding the differences of meanings between words (that may seem like synonyms) is the Malbim. He has some wonderful and minute distinctions between such pairs, and he holds to them throughout his commentary on the Tanach. These small differences can open a wide world of new understandings. Luckily, he does ...


5

Rashi in Beshalach on "chamushim" states that all those left behind died during the three days of darkness. Every member of Bnai Yisrael who survived left in the Exodus. Thus, if a husband or wife was left behind, the person who left was a widow or widower.


3

(No sources; this is my own thinking.) We learn that we must take positive action to affirm our relationship with God and k'lal Yisrael. Yisraelites who merited being spared from this affliction were nonetheless affected if they did not take action. We learn that we sometimes must take public action to affirm our status as Yisraelim. The blood was placed ...


3

the Ba'al Ha'agada writes, chayav adam l'rois es atzmo, k'ilu hu yatza m'mitrayim. there is an obligation to view oneself as if he were leaving mitrayim. it isn't a commerotaion of the past, rather it is reliving the moment. rav yerucham levovitz in da'as torah parshat tzav explains that the ability of imagination and thought is in fact a tool to create, and ...


3

Ramban (13th century) famously writes in his commentary to Torah at the end of parshat Bo that through commemorating the miraculous events in Egypt we reaffirm the fundaments of God's knowledge of and involvement with the world. יצוה אותנו שנעשה תמיד זכרון ואות לאשר ראו עינינו, ונעתיק הדבר אל בנינו, ובניהם לבניהם, ובניהם לדור אחרון. והחמיר מאד בענין... ...


2

"After they will leave with a great possession" To what was this referring? The Great Possession was really the Torah! But haShem asked Moshe to tell the B'nei Yisroel to request gold & silver vessels from the Egyptians to ensure that none of the less sophisticated members of the B'nei Yisroel would not underestimate the value of the Torah and ...


2

The general point is made here in a Haggada printed in 1907. It doesn't give its source, and doesn't specifically point out how the 9 months fits. Regarding pregnancy, specifically, this is in the Talmud Sotah 11b, although I suppose the emphasis on "carrying pregnancies to term", as opposed to just working to have babies, could be a bit of editorializing by ...


2

The Maharal says (Gevuras Hashem 61) that all Jews for all time were directly affected by being redeemed from Egypt, even though there are subsequent exiles, the exodus makes every person alive today inherently a free person, and any subsequent enslavement is only temporary and external. So the events of the exodus have a direct continued effect on our ...


2

I've tried to keep to the literal interpretation as much as possible. ‘Reuven’, as it is stated, (Exodus 3, 7,) “I have surely seen the affliction of My people.” ‘Shimon’, named for (Exodus 2, 24,) “And God heard their groaning.” ‘Levi’, named so because the Holy One, blessed be He connected to their plight from the midst of the bush, to fulfil what is ...


2

Rav Hirsch groups the plagues as shown in the Hagadah as three groups. He groups them in three rows each with three columns and explains both the rows and the columns and explains in וארא 7:15 ...דצך remedy Egyptians from the erroneous ideas of גרות עבדות ועינוי by the revelation of Hashem's Power and Almightiness on water and land אדש by the ...


1

In many Mitzvos we are told to do it since Hashem took us out of Mitzraim. This is not a direct train for this particular Mitzva but it is a region why we must adhere to Hashem. We are His slaves now. However, being that this comes in the place of the earlier 'In six days...' this suggests that it is in some way a reasoning for the Mitzva. Shabbos is our ...


1

The Maharal (Gevuros Hashem 19) writes that they were specifically left alive to be counter-weights to Moshe and Aharon. The Jewish people were granted such great leaders as Moshe and Aharon, זה לעומת זה Hashem left Dasan and Aviram to oppose and challenge them and, so to speak, keep the balance.


1

Far from a complete answer but perhaps "heavy" is not the best translation contextually of כבד which suggests instead more Pharaoh's incredible hubris (כבוד). That root seems to only appear in the initial stages of the confrontations, when direct divine intervention was not yet as necessary in order to incite his arrogant stubbornness.


1

A possible way to understand the different usage is to look to the Targum Onkelos. In the examples you cite, Shemot 14:17 and Shemot 14:25: וַאֲנִ֗י הִנְנִ֤י מְחַזֵּק֙ אֶת־לֵ֣ב מִצְרַ֔יִם וְיָבֹ֖אוּ אַחֲרֵיהֶ֑ם וְאִכָּבְדָ֤ה בְּפַרְעֹה֙ וּבְכָל־חֵיל֔וֹ בְּרִכְבּ֖וֹ וּבְפָרָשָֽׁיו׃ וַיָּ֗סַר אֵ֚ת אֹפַ֣ן מַרְכְּבֹתָ֔יו וַֽיְנַהֲגֵ֖הוּ בִּכְבֵדֻ֑ת ...


1

What can we learn from the Jews being commanded to put blood on the doorposts of their homes in Egypt? There is life in the blood. Leviticus 17:11 For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul. This blood allowed ...


1

See YU's Empowered Learning by Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks. His message is that “destiny created history” and as the Ibn Ezra says to Exodus 13:8 “And thou shalt tell thy son in that day, saying: It is because of that which the L-rd did for me when I came forth out of Egypt. והַגּדָתּ לבְנָך בּיּוֹם ההוּא לאמר בֲּעבוּר זה עשָֹה ה' לי בֵּצאתי ...


1

We see from the dvar Torah from Rabbi Moshe Kormornick (www.shortvort.com) quoted above that the Jews definitely did not have any intention of returning to Egypt to convert the Egyptians! We can also add a proof to this based on Hashem's words to Moshe: "You will not see Pharoah every again (alive)" We also have a debate in the Gemora whether Pharaoh was ...



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