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13

Judaism doesn't have a current pilgrimage obligation the way I understand that Islam does (I believe every Muslim is required to go to Mecca once). However, Israel and, more specifically, Jerusalem is very important to Jews; Israel is our homeland, and Jerusalem is the site of the temples (past and future). Further, Jerusalem used to be a pilgrimage ...


10

The Rabbis at the time ruled that since the dead could not be moved from the Old City they should be moved into a temporary grave until an opportunity would allow them to be re-interned on the Mount of Olives. Unfortunately that took another 19 years to happen. .. in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem some 40 fighters and others who were ...


9

The Rambam (Moreh Nevukhim Part III, 45) writes, concerning Mount Moriah: "The fact that the Torah does not make specific mention of it [Jerusalem], but rather hints at it and says, "…[the place] which God will choose" etc., appears to me to have three explanations. The first: so that the nations would not seize the place and wage power struggles over it, ...


8

I think that the inner colonnaded wall in the Garrard model is actually meant to demarcate the original area of the Temple Mount, which per the Mishnah, Middos 2:1 (English translation here) was a square, 500 cubits (about 800-1000 feet) to a side. [The outer wall, with its colonnade, would be the enlarged area after Herod's renovation of the Temple, ...


8

As you said, Ralbag (and most of the commentaries) understand this to be talking about statues of some kind. (Metzudas David to 5:8 also cites this as a second explanation.) So according to that view of things, David had nothing against the blind and lame people any more than against any of the other Jebusites. Metzudas David's first explanation (to 5:6), ...


8

Rav Moshe Feinstein could not have said that, since it contradicts explicit passages in the Talmud: Eruvin 6b: אמר רבי יוחנן ירושלים אילמלא דלתותיה ננעלות בלילה חייבין עליה משום רשות הרבים Rabbi Yochanan says: If not for its doors being closed at night, one would transgress for carrying in a public domain in Jerusalem. Once the doors were closed, ...


8

The Gemara in Taanit 28b quotes the verse in Yirmiyahu and resolves the contradiction by saying that the walls of Jerusalem were breached on the 17th day of the month of Tammuz during the time of the second Temple not the first Temple.


7

The Yerushalmi (Taanis 4:5) offers a different view: the walls were indeed breached on the 17th of Tammuz, but there was "a mixup of calculations" and it was mistakenly thought to be the 9th. (The implication, then, is that Hashem told the prophet to record the date that people thought it was.) It then also goes on to note that there is a verse (Ez. 26:1) ...


6

The Rambam rules in Chagigah 2:1 that someone who is tamei is exempt from ri'iyah. A metzora' would seem to be included in this category.


6

There are numerous Talmudic sources which refer to a "Golden Jerusalem", these sources, however, are not referring to the actual city of Jerusalem but to a piece of jewelry which was colloquially referred to as "Golden Jerusalem" or "Golden City". It was probably a tiara which was engraved to resemble a city skyline. That being said, the song Yerushalyim ...


6

The reason why we light candles a few minutes early (18 minutes) is in order to avoid any possibility of starting Shabbat late. Think of it as a train leaving the station. If you're one minute late, you missed it. By the way, though most communities light Shabbat candles 18 minutes before sunset, local custom may vary. For instance in Jerusalem, the custom ...


6

There is no specific Mitzva to visit Eretz Yisroel, however (Kesubos 111a) walking 4 (Amos) cubits in Eretz Yisroel is a Mitzva. In addition there are many Mitzvos that can be done exclusively in eretz Yisroel.


6

Artscroll זמירות לשבת (with sources) page 185: וְהוּא יִדְרֹשׁ לְצִיּוֹן עִיר הַנִּדָּחָה - May He seek out Zion the outcast city. The phrase is based on Jeremiah 30:17 where Jerusalem - Zion - is called outcast because no one cares about her. The prayer is, therefore, that God end this tragic status by seeking out Zion and making her ...


6

There is no stone on the exposed kotel which is opposite the kodesh hakadoshim. However if you go to the tunnel tours there is a spot marked which is. See this page for maps and pictures: http://www.generationword.com/jerusalem101/38-western-wall-tunnels.html


5

As long as your giving happened on your Purim, you fulfilled your obligation. The halacha is that if you wake up Purim morning and look around town and can't find any poor people, you can send the money in the mail, or just set aside the money for whenever you find a poor person. Chayei Adam 154:28, among others. ואם הוא במקום שאין עניים שם, יכול לעכב ...


5

I had assumed that this objection was due to not wanting to call Yerushalayim an Ir Hanidachas; or else just describing Yerushalayim in negative terms. I daven in a shteibel in Kew Gardens Hills, Rabbi Freidman's shul (the Ulemer Rebbe, affiliated with Spinka), and the sefer they use for shalashudes has עיר המשובחה, ir hameshubacha, in its place. And this is ...


4

When giving Matanos L'Evyonim, the money should be given on Purim and received on Purim. For one who wishes to give Matanos L'Evyonim to Aniyim in Yerushalayim this presents a problem. Since they celebrate Purim on a different day, how can we give them Matanos L'Evyonim and still be Mekayem the Mitzva? If we give it on the fourteenth when we observe Purim, ...


4

The Radak says the outer wall was broken on the Nith the internal wall that allowed the soldiers in was on the 17th


4

The only natural fresh water source around Jerusalem is the Gihon spring located just to the east of the city. Originally, there was an aqueduct that brought water into the city, but it was at ground level and could relatively easily be attacked by opposing armies, as the spring was located outside the city walls due to engineering concerns. King Hezekiah in ...


4

According to the Ra'avad, Har Habayis (Temple Mount) does not have Kedusha nowadays, so there would be no halachik issue with visiting any part of it. However, most poskim assume like the Rambam that Har Habayis retains its kedusha even though the Beis haMikdash has been destroyed. This means people can only visit areas that are allowed based on their ...


4

This could be Malchitzedek, traditionally identified as Shem, son of Noah. He was a priest and the ruler of Yerushalayim* in the time of Avraham Avinu, although it was then known as Shalem (see Parshat Lech-Lecha and commentary ad loc.).


3

There are those that hold you may, however the majority of contemporary Poskim hold you may not. http://www.templeinstitute.org/archive/25-01-05.htm This link goes to a website that supports going to the Temple Mount. http://www.templeinstitute.org/main.htm


3

There is a mitzvah to live in Israel. The Ramban states that this is 1 of the 613 mitzvos of the Torah. Other rishonim consider it as a mitzvah also, but perhaps not 1 of the 613. It applies nowadays according to almost every view. Visiting any place in Israel can be considered a partial fulfillment of that mitzvah. There is an additional mitzvah to visit ...


3

Indeed the custom here in Jerusalem is to light candels 40 minutes before Shekiah. The current Chief Rabbi of Jerusalem, Rabbi Moishe Shternbuch discusses the source of this custom in his book Moadim U'Zmanim (vol 8, siman 156). I will try to elaborate more on this after Shabbos if I remember!


2

Rabbi Eleazar Ben Hanania Ben Hizkiya. The evidence for this one is not 100% proof, but: 1) In Shabbat 13b it says that חנניה בן חזקיה וסעתו compiled Megillat Taanit. He is also identified as one of the leaders of Beit Shammai, and is known for "saving" the book of Ezekiel among other things. 2) We only have an Aramaic version of Megilat Taanit, but ...


2

The source is a song which was written not too long ago. The words of the song are a pun based on the Gemara (which you quoted) which refer to a certain type of jewelry which depicted the city of Jerusalem in gold.


2

My concordance (Even-Shoshan) reports that there are only four places in Tanach where "Yerushalayim" has the yud between the lamed and mem. One is in the book of Esther ("who had been exiled from Yerushalayim"); once in Jeremiah ("v'samti es yerushalayim le'iyim"); once in II Chronicles, and I don't recall the last one off the top of my head. But look it up ...


2

According to ד"ר יוסף נדבה there was a Mechitza up until 5689 (1928) when it was removed by the British authorities.


2

Okay let me rephrase the question without all the commentary: How were altars allowed in Israel other than in Jerusalem? The answer is simple enough. The law was: "until you pick the one special final place, there can be other altars. Once you get that special place, all sacrifice will be there." And Jerusalem was that place. Deuteronomy Chapter 12: ...


2

Remind me, isn't there an interpretation that these were statues of forefathers who had made some sort of peace treaty with them? Or something to that effect.



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