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14

Ari Zivotofsky and I have worked hard to collect tens of testimonies from Yemenites and North Africans on the ID and traditions of which chagav (locust-like insect) is kosher. There is no question, as there are still many people alive who can remember them from their countries of origin. Birds as the paradigm As mentioned in Isaac Moses' response above, ...


11

Otzar Ta'amei Haminhagim (cf.) explains that it is a remnant of a time when the spoken language was Aramaic. Since the primary purpose of s'fira is the keeping track of days it is preferable to count in a language that enables the counter to keep track - i.e. a language the counter understands.


9

Ramban mentions it in his letter to the French Sages in defense of Rambam (in 1232). He writes (last line of the page, and continuing from there): והנני מעיד עלי לפני רבותי שמים וארץ, כי שמענו ממגידי אמת שבכל ארצות מלכות תימן, קהלות רבות עוסקים בתורה ובמצות לשמן, והיו מזכירים שם הרב בכל קדיש וקדיש: "בחייכון וביומיכון ובחיי דרבנא משה בן מיימון", ...


8

It seems to me from the quote from the last Chief Rabbi of Yemen, Rabbi Amram Korach, that they didn't follow the Rambam in this regard because they found the kudu horn more beautiful for the mitzvah. "The shofar of Rosh HaShanah, that they were accustomed to blowing, was long and twisted, two or three twists, and its sound was pure and eerie. Some ...


7

I have heard, I believe from Rabbi Daniel Stein, that Rav Soloveitchk is quoted as crafting the following logic: Chicken soup, unlike water, does not as a practical reality lose its cooking (azil lei bishulei) when cooled. If I have water, boil it, and let it cool, it is basically back to where I started. If I cook soup, and let it cool, I have cold ...


5

The author of Or HaChayim writes (Pri To'ar 85) that he discouraged the members of his city from eating them for a few reasons, one of them being because their tradition was not completely reliable. I later happened to come across this article which discusses this topic more extensively.


4

The Babylonian system derives its name from its place of origin, but it was also found well out of Babylon. In Yemen, for instance, manuscripts following this system have been used up to this day. The earliest manuscripts using this system are a Geniza fragment from Cairo of the beginning of the tenth century and a complete manuscript of the ...


4

HaRav Yoseph Qafih zt"l writes in his book Halikhoth Teman that it was a custom primarily of kohanim who came to Yemen in antiquity. And the idea that Yemenite Jewry was isolated from the Jewish world and its literature throughout the ages is a myth. Adan was a port city and other ports on the coast of Yemen were a frequent stop for those sailing around ...


3

I forwarded your questions, concerning the practice of Yemenite Jews who follow the Rambam, to R. Ratzon Arusi, through the Netzach Yisra'el website, and got the following answers( in "מספר החוליות בציצית"): They tie either seven or thirteen Chuliyot.( He did not elaborate as to whether this depended on personal preference, local custom, or anything else. ...


3

It seems from the Tshuvos HaRambam 244 that one does not need to grow their payos long and in fact the Rambam did not grow his long.However in this tshuvah it seems the masses had such an idea of growing them long. http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=1731&st=&pgnum=170 The Ben Ish Chai in his drashos on parshas zachor brings a proof from ...


3

Some of the traditional Mishna recitation tunes of the Edot HaMizrach can be found on the website of Mishna Sedura at http://www.mishnasdura.org.il/ For example: http://www.mishnasdura.org.il/files/megillaA.mp3 by Rabbi Yitzchak Sharvit according to his original adaptation of modern punctuation to Sephardic tradition. ...


3

The nine places where a different letter appears are: מנש(ו)א Genesis 4:13 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. Temoni מעינ(ו)ת Genesis 7:11 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. Temoni ויהי(ו)‏ Genesis 9:29 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. Temoni ת(י)עשה Exodus 25:31 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. Temoni האפ(ו)ד Exodus 28:26 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. Temoni בשמ(ו)ת Numbers 1:17 Ashkenazi/Sephardi vs. ...


2

Is there a picture of their technique or a description how it's done? Screen cap from the link that MoriDoweedhYaa3qob posted: Using some cloth (Talith or similar) the parchment is lifted to about head-height. To do this, one would have to unroll the Sefer Torah while lifting it. Probably best to grab it at the seam (which you can find every 3 to 4 ...


2

While you may not start or enhance the cooking process on Shabbat, you are allowed to leave a dish to cook if the cooking process started before Shabbat began. You would put the food into a low oven or slow-cooker before the start of Shabbat and take it out the next day when you want to eat it. You may not interfere with the food until you take it out and ...


2

I don't know if it was discussing solids or liquids, but Rabbi Michael Broyde observes that fifty years ago, many Jews who put their lives on the line to keep shabbos (when many couldn't or didn't) would take cold cooked food on shabbos morning and put it in the already-on oven. He said Rabbi Moshe Feinstein wrote, as a limud zchut (way of finding merit for ...


2

(In order of your original question) First of all, I would like to correct an apparent misconception regarding the halakhic positions of traditional Temanim. While it is true that they they generally follow the Rambam as opposed to later authorities, at no time in their history did the Jews of Yemen follow the Mishneh Torah exclusively. Instead, the ...


1

I'm Netanel, from Israel. My father-in-law is Baal-Kore and he is also Mori in his Yemenite community. He is very professional and teaching kids for Bar-Mitzva as a way of life. If it is still relevant, you are most welcome to contact me and we will arrange it. We will find the way to do it.


1

The Italian tradition for reciting the Mishnah is now almost lost but it survives in the tunes of the rabbinical parts of the Pessach seder. In this multimedial haggadah you can hear it by clicking on the musical note symbol. An example is this.


1

Rav Dov Lior rules to put Techeleth, he also rules to make double knot in the beginning and then to make ties by Rambam. I've heard this on his lesson on Mishna Berura where he showed his tzitzis tied this way. From this I conclude that double knot is essential.


1

It is a machloket recorded in the Holy Zohar regarding this. The opinion that says seven refers to the seven raki'ot of the shamayim, and the opinion that says thirteen says that is because of the thirteen attributes of mercy.


1

From www.tallit-shop.com : Among Yemenite Jews who follow the Baladi tradition, the tzitzit on a Yemenite tallit are tied according to the Rambam, with seven “joints” not separated by any knots.


1

They preserve the Babylonian custom, where the native tongue of most people was Aramaic. The earliest attestation of saying the sefira in Aramaic of which I am aware is in the siddur of R. Saadia Gaon (see here, bottom of the page).



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