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From personal experience, here's what the Sofer thinks about, while writing: It's Lishma - and watch out for names of Hashem that need individual attention to become Lishma. Don't smudge, it's wet ink all around! Is there enough ink to finish the word? Don't drip when refilling the quill. Double check that you didn't overfill and risk a flood. Don't miss ...


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I discovered that the מגילת אסתר of the תורה שלֵמה has some answers: For פרמשתא, citing מדרש רבי עקיבא בן יוסף על אותיות קטנות:‎ פרמשתא, ש׳ ת׳ של פרמשתא קטנה, הסר פ׳ ור׳ וישאר שמתא.‏ This one is hard to translate and explain. So I'll leave it as is. For ויזתא: The Gemara in Megila (16b) says in the name of Rav Yochanan - the Vav of ...


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Contemporary Poskim are divided on this matter: Rav Nissim Karelitz (Chut Shani 1:20, 1) : Rabbinically prohibited because this is considered impermanent writing. Rav Shmuel Wosner (Shut Shevet Halevi 10:60) : It is not writing at all but is prohibited because of zilzul (slighting) in the honor of Shabbos Rav Shlomo Zalman Auerbach (ibid) permits it. ...


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See the article on parashah in Wikipedia . Some extracts from it: A parashah formally means a section of a biblical book in the masoretic text of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible).[1] In the masoretic text, parashah sections are designated by various types of spacing between them, as found in Torah scrolls, scrolls of the books of Nevi'im or Ketuvim ...


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Isaac Moses has the answer. It is an honorific title. They are different as they don't apply equally, generally due to grammar considerations. In your second example, the only difference is grammar (in the linked question I added the one for the male side that wasn't there before). May he/she live. One exception is נ"י. In that context, as Isaac Moses ...


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the chasam sofer (shu"t cheilek vov siman tes) qoutes the shaloh answering this question moshe wrote the sifrei torah "bi-hasvoas hakulmos (he wrote with feathers in between each of his hands) which is no better then writing with your weaker hand and that is only a derabanan (which was only institued later) a lot better of a question would be how was it ...


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I'm not sure how to answer this question for anyone but myself. The barest minimum requirement for writing a sefer torah is that it be legible. The ink must be black, and the traditional fonts pretty much require all the letters to be very bold. In that sense the sofer does not have to worry about usability because halacha and minhag do the worrying for ...


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There are different opinions regarding this ruling of דברים שבעל פה אי אתה רשאי לאומרן בכתב. Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Ehrenreich suggested that the Rambam doesn't bring this ruling because in his opinion it's only Rabbinically forbidden. Opinions that it's Biblical: שו"ת חתם סופר או"ח סי' ר"ח. גם בס' חרדים (פ"ב מצות התלויות בעינים) עיי"ש, וכ"כ בשו"ת תשב"ץ ח"א ...


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When it comes to relationships the Sefarim do not call the body parts by their name. It is called אותו מקום. This would indicate to me that it is inappropriate to write Nivul Pe. I would say that it can cause one to read it out loud and say it.


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See http://rabbikaganoff.com/archives/1587/comment-page-1: (there's more there than I quote here, but I think this is most relevant to the question) HOLY BOOKS THAT DO NOT INCLUDE HASHEM’S NAME Destroying Torah writings that do not include Hashem’s name is prohibited mi’derabbanan (see Rambam, Hil. Yesodei HaTorah 6:8, based on Shabbos 115, 116). ...


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No, not a Melacha DeOraysa. It's not permanent, and in fact requires constant active application of electricity to maintain. If you were to pull the plug, it would instantly disappear. As such, it would at most be an Issur DeRabbannan. Please see these questions for more information: Is it permissible to erase the name of G-d from an E-reader? Is ...


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One can also look into the connection of vowels with sefirot (chased, gevurah, tifferet, etc), different aspect/attributes of Hashem


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Wow, I was fascinated by the question, so I looked it up... First, an introduction of a central concept: There is a disagreement that wends through the Talmud (like Sanhedrin 4a,b) regarding the words of a Torah scroll whether "Yesh Aim leMikrah" or "Yesh Aim leMesoret". Roughly translated, that means "Primacy is given to how it is read" or "Primacy is ...



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