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15

Well it took me almost a year, but I can now answer my own question. In Person The National Library of Israel has everything (and I mean everything) you could ever want when it comes to Hebrew books. Although they don't allow people to check out their rare books, you can sit in the reading room and read anything in their collection for as long as you like. ...


6

The sefer Shmiras Shabbos K'Hilchasah (16:33) paskens without reservation that dice games for recreation (not gambling) are fully permitted on Shabbos. No qualification is made for fear of writing by accident. A strict opinion (which not all hold like as Halachah) is brought by the Chayey Adam (Shabbos 11:38). He holds that any game which usually involves ...


5

Not writing on Chol Hamo'ed is a formal prohibition, the original source of which is Mo'ed Kattan 18b, in the Mishna at the bottom of the page. Writing is considered a skilled craft (meleches uman) and is therefore prohibited on Chol Hamo'ed. The Shulchan Aruch codifies this halacha in Orach Chaim 545:1. The reason that only some people don't write is ...


4

The tikkun in question in the original was the long version found in the Mantua edition. The Vilna edition of Tikunei HaZohar with the commentary of the Vilna Gaon mentions this in the main text at the end of the shortened version. The 5th volume of Tikunei HaZohar with the commentary of Ohr Yakar also has the long version. And the long version is also what ...


3

The claim that this text was censored and that this is somehow related to Shabbatai Tzvi seems unlikely for two reasons: The text is moved to tikkun 21 and not removed entirely (beginning on 48a in the 1740 Qushta edition) The suggestion that this text be moved to tikkun 21 appears long before Shabbatai Tzvi. For example see this, but unfortunately the ...


3

According to the website IsraelDailyPicture, (which presents historical photos of Israel with explanations) those are memorial notices. Two such pictures can be seen here, and the text (names in the form X ben Y) is readable in at least one. Further, in this post from the same site, it says, "The darkness of the writing suggests that it was written ...


2

Yes, one could write down parts of the Oral Law for his own personal use. The Rambam writes this explicitly in his introduction to the Yad: רבנו הקדוש חיבר המשנה. ומימות משה ועד רבנו הקדוש, לא חיברו חיבור שמלמדין אותו ברבים בתורה שבעל פה; אלא בכל דור ודור, ראש בית דין או נביא שיהיה באותו הדור, כותב לעצמו זיכרון בשמועות ששמע מרבותיו, והוא מלמד על פה ...


2

In the Sefer שאלת רב which is questions that were asked of R' Chaim Kanievsky, he was asked this specific question and ruled that in a letter to a non-Jew it should not be written. (שאלת רב, חלק א' פרק כ"ב אות ז - no link available): ז. המנהג לכתוב בכל איגרת בס"ד ובימי בין המצרים על נחמת ציון וכו" ובאלול אני לדודי וכו' מהו כשכותב אגרת לנכרי תשובה ...


1

I argue here based on the Gemara (Makos 21a), the Shulchan Aruch (YD § 180), and other sources, that when (1) a particular tattoo is in fact non-idolatrous; and (2) the very nature of the particular tattoo is such that it can be objectively presumed to be non-idolatrous, it is permissible under normative halacha. This applies, for example, to permanent ...



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