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Should be prohibited, pretty much the same as the Mishna Pesachim 3:1. אלו עוברין בפסח, כתח הבבלי, ושכר המדי, וחמץ האדומי, וזיתום המצרי, וזומן של צבעים ה, ועמילן של טבחים, וקולן של סופרים. רבי אליעזר אומר, אף תכשיטי נשים. זה הכלל ו, כל שהוא ממין דגן, הרי זה עובר בפסח. הרי אלו באזהרה, ואין בהן משום כרת. Rabbi Ovadiah of Bartenura explains: עד ...


4

Your question asked about "making" the ink on Pesach. "Flour" was one of the ingredients. If you have unguarded flour (of wheat, barley, spelt, oats, or rye,) and you want to own it, then the problem starts as soon as you pick it up to take possession. It may have gotten wet and become "chametz"? As flour, it is not yet mixed into the other ingredients that ...


3

Dose of Halacha bring sources that allow it and those that forbid it based on different reason than mentioned above: Whether printing from a computer is considered ma'aseh hedyot or ma'aseh uman is the source of much debate. The dilemma is that while certainly nowadays typing requires less skill than writing (see Chol Hamoed Kehilchaso 6:89), nonetheless ...


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I don't think there is any problem with doing this. You are not creating the image, you are just allowing it to be seen by removing something which prevented you from seeing it. There is a discussion regarding a form of invisible ink that by putting it next to the flame it can be seen, which according to the Pri Megadim is rabbinically prohibited. But there ...


1

Israel Yeivin, Introduction to the Tiberian Masorah (ed. E.J. Revell; Scholars Press, 1985) discusses these "large" and "small" letters (among other peculiarities pertaining to letters) on pp. 47-48 (§§ 84-85). He refers to the Masorah's listing of "a few dozen" examples of large letters, although in the list provided in a previous answer there are 29 ...



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