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16

It's called Stam, and was designed by Francesca Baruch in the 1930s (originally for the logo of the newspaper Haaretz - this logo is still in use). Not to be confused with more recent fonts also bearing the name Stam, which are made to look like Ashkenazic or Sephardic Torah lettering, complete with crowns on the letters. I see where Davka has repackaged ...


11

The source for all the melachos comes from the actions done to build (or operate) the Mishkan. Writing was used to make symbols on the boards that made up the outer walls. They were used so that when the Mishkan was disassembled and reassembled they would know which boards went where. Two letters (one on each board) were used to mark which boards matched ...


10

I don't know the origin, but in one form or another it goes back at least to the Rambam: he began each section of his major works with the phrase בשם ה' א-ל עולם (though this has been omitted in most later printings). There are halachic opinions that the letter ה has kedushah when it is used to represent Hashem's name (since it is one of its letters), and ...


9

It took me just over three years for each that I did. I wrote roughly half an amud(21 lines a day) using a reed. The cost was just over $8k, but I used an exceptionally high quality klaf(better surfaced and no gid marks). For the second it was just over $12K(though that was a nightmare of a sefer to write). I wrote in Klaf Gvil, which costs double the ...


9

Let's assume MLA style. eHow has this: Lastly, if your source is a sacred text, such as the Bible or Talmud, cite the edition, book, chapter, and verse. This may vary according to each text. ([Edition], [Book]. [Chapter].[Verse]) So treat Talmud like Bible. Purdue University's writing lab has this: Citing the Bible In your first ...


9

In this answer, Rabbi Moshe Leib Halberstadt concludes that: in a case of temporary henna tattoos which are placed on top of the skin and do not last for more than a few weeks, there is no prohibition, neither from the Torah nor from rabbinic law. Because even according to the Minchat Chinuch that rabbinically prohibits external writing on the body even ...


8

It is mentioned in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rashi_script that it was not Rashi's script (according to he.wikipedia.org, the script is actually sefardic in origin). The printers needed a new script to differentiate commentaries from the main text. (Tosfos also uses "Rashi letters" as well as many other commentaries)


8

Hashem is the author of the Torah. Generally the author of a work writes it. Actually nowadays the author generally types it, nevertheless, we still say so and so "wrote" it. Who transcribed it or how they did so is incidental to who authored it. In other words saying Hashem wrote the Torah is just a generic way to convey in English that Hashem is its ...


8

In the words of the Shulchan Aruch (OC 49:1), אף על גב דקיימא לן דברים שבכתב אי אתה רשאי לאומרם על פה כל דבר שרגיל ושגור בפי הכל כגון קריאת שמע וברכת כהנים ופרשת התמיד וכיוצא בהן מותר So Shema and the blessings of the kohanim are OK to say by heart since "everyone is fluent in them". Many poskim discuss what is considered "everyone is fluent in", and ...


8

There some times where (according to kabala or something) one should have a certain vowelization of the name in mind (while still saying "Adonay" of course). You'll sometimes see the name with four tzeres or with four sh'vas or the like then. I know nothing more about this than I've just written. Otherwise, the vowelization seems to be to point to its ...


7

ב"ה stands for Be'ezras Hashem - which is technically the Hebrew translation for B'siyata Dishmaya.


7

A reasonable compromise I've sometimes seen is to enclose the original abbreviation in parentheses, and follow it by the updated one in square brackets, like so: ...הרב פלוני (שליט"א) [זצ"ל] אמר


7

From Rashi to Shabat 73:1 on the Mishna: ".. and writes one letter in one (plank) and another one in the adjacent". From here we learn that there was only 1 letter in each one. But the letters were written in pairs (one for each plank) that's the reason why the melacha speaks of 2 letters. א-א, ב-ב, ג-ג... Although I didn't find a source for it but the ...


7

I'm still hoping someone has a sourced answer, but I came up with a possible answer last night - reverse order. I was learning Shabbos 104a, where the Gemara gives a really nice explaination of the meaning behind the order/shape of the letters in the alef-bet, and how it reflects the actions and reward of a Tzadik. Since the luchot could be read from both ...


6

According to Shabbos 103a, you're chayiv for writing two letters becuase that's how they marked the boards of the Tabernacle. However, 103b specifies that just two lines would count too. He is guilty only on account of making a mark, because marks were made on each of the boards of the Tabernacle to know which was its companion. Therefore if one draws ...


6

On the Beit El Yeshiva Center site (originally posted by jake, and used by yydl in his answer), someone asks about: a new tattoo ink called freedom-2 that is permanent, but when you want to remove it, there is a formula that breaks it down and the body absorbs it." Rabbi Yitzchak Grinblat says: Halachikly even this tattoo is Asur because of Marit ...


6

People publish sidurim with Hashem's name all the time. That's what you're doing, albeit by photocopy (or laser printing) rather than by offset. So you're in the clear. (This answer doesn't, however, touch on copyright concerns.) As always, though, for practical halacha, consult your rabbi rather than relying on what you read on this site.


5

Try Sefer Katan Ve'Gadol, by Rabbi Zvi Ron. It brings together all the different midrashim about every big or small letter in Tanach.


5

He didn't. According to a Mansucript Preparation class I attended this year, what's known as Rashi script was the font the printer used. As a side point, the script used in some Judeo-Arabic written manuscripts - particularly the Rambam's handwriting - is very similar to Rashi script.


5

Throughout the Torah there is a full alphabet in big letters and a full alphabet of small letters.


5

The Lubavitcher Rebbe writes that while he did not receive an explicit instruction, the custom among many old printers (many of whom were big Torah scholars) to write the simple and not the final letter(look in most gemaras on Daf Chof, for example). Practically, most letters that were written in the Chofs (the 60's) were written with a smiple chof. I've ...


5

BS"D (or בס״ד) stands for B'sayata d'shmaya, which translates to "with the help of heaven." B"H (or ב״ה) used in the same context at the top of the page stands for B'ezrat Hashem, which translates to "with God's help." בס״ד is the Aramaic version, ב״ה is the hebrew version, and they mean exactly the same thing. It may be that in other contexts, ב״ה means ...


5

In general, with any question about writing and erasing Hashem's name it is useful to check the halachos of writing and erasing on Shabbos, because there is a lot of overlap. R' Moshe paskens that playing Scrabble on Shabbos is neither writing nor erasing, unless you're actually sticking them in their place like some deluxe sets. In that case he says one ...


5

The Tur Yoreh Deah 274 says in the name of the Rosh that there is no issue with the different lettering. The Meiri Shabbos 104a also indicates that there is no issue. The Noda B'Yehuda Yora Deah 171 also indicates that it is fine.


5

Just to throw in a few more modern sources: Har Tzevi OC 1:32, Minchat Yitzchak 4:47 and Mishneh Halachot 7:8 all explicitly rule that Vellish is kosher. Tzitz Eliezer 14:3:4 permits post facto even Sta"m that was written with a mix of Vellish and Ashkenazi. Igrot Moshe OC 5:2 also permits other forms of writing but he is quick to point out that it is better ...


5

The Taz in hilchos Sefer Torah Yoreh Deah siman 271 s.k. 8 says it is a good ksiva.


4

Talman modern edition of the gemarah is still printing little circles. In the end there is a place where the whole psukim are cited. Also an asterisk is in use as before. Here is a picture, found on the internet, of one of the pages in this edition of the Talmud.. In other editions they added a lot of stuff to the page, so the place beside the verse is ...


4

It's a machlokes (dispute among) rishonim. See a talk by Rabbi Josh Flug, and the sources he cites, if you're interested in the machlokes, but I'll note that among Rabbi Flug's points are that Rashi holds purchasing suffices and that Rambam seems to hold it does not; CYLOR if you're interested in the practical halacha.


4

The format of the citation depends on the house style you’re using (e.g., Chicago or MLA); I’ll address the content of the citation. Mentioning the particular printing of the Talmud you’re using is only meaningful if you’re quoting the translation or if the edition has a different girsa that you’re specifically referring to. Otherwise, the “edition” is ...


4

I heard a shiur given by Rav Moshe Heinemann of Baltimore (probably about 15 years ago) in which he mentioned that typing on Chol HaMoed is permitted. The sevara he gave was that the act of typing is not a Ma'aseh Uman as just about anyone is capable of typing. Rabbi Heinemaan pointed out that although the results of something typed by an expert typist ...



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