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א מענטש מוס טאן נישט אויפטאן = "A Mentsch muss tun, nicht auftun" is a very known thought and saying in Jewish Ethics


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There is a distinction between Behema Tehora (בהמה טהורה) and Behema Tmei'a (בהמה טמאה). "Behema Tehora" The definition is according to the Even Ezra in Bereshis (1, 24) - "Behema - that they are with people for their needs, to ride and to eat" (שהם עם בני אדם לצרכם לרכוב ולאכול). "Behema Tmei'a" The definition follows the Ramban's words in Bereshis (1, ...


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From shaareihoraah.org, Parshat Re'eh: Within the general family of land-dwellers, Halacha divides them into two sub-categories, Beheima and Chaya (generally translated as domesticated and wild animals respectively). The distinction between these classifications is trickier [than kosher vs. non-kosher] and quite complicated. While both groups share the ...


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The Ramban writes in his hassagos to shoresh sheni of the Rambam in sefer Hamitzvos that there is not even one extra letter in the Torah: אבל הכתוב יכלול הכל כי אין הפשט כדברי חסרי דעת הלשון ולא כדעת הצדוקים. כי ספר תורת ה' תמימה אין בה אות יתר וחסר כולם בחכמה נכתבו Rather, the verses contain all [of the ideas contained in the d'rshos of Chazal] ...


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Archaelogy has seen this textual oddity of yours play out repeteadly in their findings. While there are many different statues, jars, and depictions that are found in ancient Israel, there has been one phrase that has shown up repeatedly, which is "His Asheirah." You can find an example of this with this ancient storage jar. The storage jar shows three ...


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It comes from Avigail and is the opposite of כף הקלע. The Pasuk in Shmuel says וְֽהָיְתָה֩ נֶ֨פֶשׁ אֲדֹנִ֜י צְרוּרָ֣ה ׀ בִּצְר֣וֹר הַחַיִּ֗ים אֵ֚ת ה' אלקיך וְאֵ֨ת נֶ֤פֶשׁ אֹיְבֶ֙יךָ֙ יְקַלְּעֶ֔נָּה בְּת֖וֹךְ כַּ֥ף הַקָּֽלַע׃ This juxtaposition makes it look like it is referring to rest as opposed to being flung about. Tzror would mean a bond, held ...


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Radak citing Yonatan, Ralbag, and Metzudot David (Samuel 1:25:29) all interpret it as a reference to meriting Olam HaBa. (It seems to me that even those who read the verse there in accordance with its straightforward meaning would agree that the intended reference on tombstones is to this Drash.)


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Rabbi Hirsch in Bereishis 26 5 writes about the word Torah. He says Torah is related to harah, not Yoreh. I''ll quote his words: תורתי which we believe does not come from ירה, but from הרה, like הוליך from הרה; הלך to receive a seed within oneself, in the Hiphil הורה to plant a seed in someone else, hence to implant the seeds of truth and goodness, of ...


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The roots are indeed the same (see, eg. the form מורה used in Samuel 1:20:36 and Chronicles 2:15:3). It's not unusual for roots to have multiple senses, and on the simplest level that's what we have: one means to shoot [arrows] and one means to teach. See the two different roots on Hebrew Wiktionary. (We can speculate if these derive from two different ...



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