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14

The literal meaning of דבטש בכספתא is: kicked the money-box - as Rashi says in Shavuos Daf 30b: בטש. בעט And similarly in Eiruvim 54a: בטשה ביה. בעטה בו And in Shabbos 116b: אתא חמרא ובטשא. דחפתו לארץ So the שורש of דבטש is בטש - and I suspect it's Aramaic - and the ד means that, to give us that kicked. כספתא is a money box, as Rashi says ...


1

Likutei Sichos 25 page 166 explains that the reason we say Shalom Aleichem in a Lashon Rabim since when 2 jews meet they are a Rabim and now they have to become B'Achdus by saying Aleichem each one shows they want peace. (Perhaps someone out there can explain it better than I did)


4

There was a decree that we greet people with Hashem's name (Brachos 54a) (and Hashem agreed to it (Makkos 23b) התקינו שיהא אדם שואל את שלום חברו בשם שנאמר והנה בעז בא מבית לחם ויאמר לקוצרים ה' עמכם ויאמרו לו יברכך ה' ואומר ה' עמך גבור החיל Shalom is the name of Hashem,as it says in Shabbos 10b אין שם שאילת שלום מסייע ליה לרב המנונא משמיה דעולא דאמר ...


0

The Vilna Gaon in Aderes Eliyahu on Bereishis 1:1 explains that בריאה defines חידוש העצם, which he describes as that which no human,no matter how intelligent or advanced, could accomplish. Accordingly, the Gaon explains that in blessings the format of בורא פרי was established, because the essential act of creation is inimitable by mankind.


4

Traditionally the Chossen is expected to give over a "vort" ie. Torah idea in order to show his future bride and in laws that he is learned. The occasion was named after the vort, and the name stuck even as the practice of actually saying the vort fell out of use.


3

A Vort is held when two sides gave each other their "vort" that they will marry each other.


1

See this article that discusses G-d's names. This is a theory, but the verses he cites, lends some credence to the idea. An alternative view proposed by W.F. Albright is that the name is connected to shadayim which means breasts in Hebrew. It may thus be connected to the notion of God’s fertility and blessings of the human race. In several ...


1

The Malbin always explains that שָׂשׂוֹן is the external manifestation of happiness, and שִׂמְחָה is feeling happy. See, for example, the Malbim on ישעיה Posuk 22:13 וְהִנֵּה שָׂשׂוֹן וְשִׂמְחָה הָרֹג בָּקָר וְשָׁחֹט צֹאן אָכֹל בָּשָׂר וְשָׁתוֹת יָיִן אָכוֹל וְשָׁתוֹ כִּי מָחָר נָמוּת: שמחה היא שמחת הלב הפנימית, וששון היא המחול והריקוד והמשתה אשר יעשו ...


-1

I believe it is the Gra who explains that Sasson refers to open, outer joy while Simcha refers to inner joy. You can explain the Pasuk as prioritizing one over the other, or suggesting which led to the other.


3

The Vilna Gaon states that simcha can exist internally, but sasson is a greater level of simcha where it manifests itself externally through your actions. That's why we say "Yasis alayich elokayich kimisos chassan al kallah" - during the wedding he is more than happy, he is "overjoyed."


0

R. Avraham Ben Harambam writes in Hamaspik L'ovdey Hashem (shaar habitachhon) that the word כל is used to mean "most" throughout scripture. (He writes this regarding the verse in Psalms 145:16 "satisfy the desire of every living thing). R. Saadya Gaon writes this too in his commentary to the Torah (I will try to find it).


1

The Vilna Gaon in Aderes Eliyahu at the beginning of Parshas Bereishis says b'riah is חידוש העצם, the creation of the "essence" of the object, yetzira is צורת הדבר בכמות, giving its dimensions or shape, and assiya is תיקון עשייתו, the set-up or preparation of its ongoing existence (the Gaon uses תקון to mean this in several contexts).


5

The Ri ibn Shuaib explains in a d'rasha on B'reishis that בריאה refers to creation ex nihilo, יצירה refers to creating a basic form, and עשייה refers to completing and arranging a thing in its final state: ומלת בריאה, פירשו בו ז"ל, הוצאת יש מאין. ויצירה, ציור הדבר. והעשיה גמר הדבר ותיקונו. R' Aryeh Kaplan provides a similar explanation in his Sefer ...


3

Targum Yonatan, the chief traditional translator of the books of the Prophets, translates this phrase into Aramaic as "גְבַר עָבֵיד רְעוּתֵהּ", which means "a man who does His will." So, "a man after His own heart" would be a reasonable colloquial and literal translation, and indeed is the one chosen by the JPS 1917 translation that was linked into the ...


0

Seems like Rav Hirsch is addressing this. He writes on that verse: בעבור in the transition to something, in the intention to achieve something. לבעבור for this intention: נסות אתכם So that you prove to yourselves whether you are able to receive God's Torah directly from Him, and inasmuch as you yourselves feel the necessity for an intermediary, you will all ...


-1

From The SWORD Project for 01961: hayah haw-yaw; a primitive root (compare 1933); to exist, i.e. be or become, come to pass (always emphatic, and not a mere copula or auxiliary):--beacon, X altogether, be(-come), accomplished, committed, like), break, cause, come (to pass), do, faint, fall, + follow, happen, X have, last, pertain, quit ...


2

As I understand it the root is היה the meaning being 'to be' or 'to exist' and this is the command of GOD 'Let there be' (light). An example of the verb in use is found in Genesis 3:1: וְהַנָּחָשׁ הָיָה עָרוּם מִכֹּל חַיַּת הַשָּׂדֶה and the serpent was (i.e. 'he was' 3rd masculine singular of the root הָיָה)more crafty than any (all) the beast of the field ...


3

Another source earlier than the Tosafos Yom Tov is the work Tishbi by R. Eliya Habachur of the 15th-16th century who disputes the idea here.


7

The earliest source1 seems to be from the ספר הפליאה - ספר הקנה who writes: ויש פירושים רבים שנעלמו מעיני כל חי ועתיד אליהו הנביא לפרשם וזהו מה שרמזו רז"ל בשבעה מסכתות תיקו "תשבי "יתרץ "קושיות "ובעיות. 1Before 1390, according to linked Wikipedia article


1

Rabbi Yissachar Shlomo Teichtal (19th-20th century) uses the expression in משנה שכיר.The expression is also used here in this earlier 19th century work. My playing around with search engines suggests that the expression arose in the latter half of the 19th century.


2

Malbim (ביאור המילות) writes on your first cited verse (Tehillim 105:45): ישמרו, ינצרו. הנוצר גדול מן השומר, והתורות צריכים שמירה יתירה יותר כי הם כוללות גם עקרי האמונה והלמודים "נצר" is a greater degree of "guarding" than "שמר;" because the תורות need to be guarded more because they also contain the main tenets of our faith and learning. (my ...


2

I do not see any difference in meaning between לְמִינוֹ and לְמִינֵהוּ, but the choice of usage between the two may have significance. The word לְמִינֵהוּ closely resembles the hypothetical way of expressing "to its kind" or "to its species" in Proto-Semitic (P.S.). Here, the Tsere vowel underneath the nun indicates that the word מִין ("species", "kind") ...


0

Similar to the Yaavetz cited by Mr. User6591, the Maharsha on this Gemara also understands the word טבעא used by the Gemara to refer to טבע. He is not directly addressing the meaning of the word, as the Yaavetz is, but from his explanation it is quite clear that this is what he takes it to mean. This would be an earlier source for this understanding of the ...


2

The Malbim explains that Kadosh means separate and above any aspect of materialism or the lowliness of physicality. Accordingly, Hashem being Kadosh would mean that he is completely separate from physicality.


3

In Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan's Handbook of Jewish thought part one, he explains this kedusha as meaning completely different and separate than any part of creation. This includes his not being corporeal and not existing within the constraints of time and space. EDIT: Here's the exact quote with his sources from chapter two, titled 'God'. Notice the ideas ...


0

In Shulchan Aruch, Choshen Mishpat 227:20, it's called "המחליף כלים בכלים או בהמה בבהמה אפילו מחט בשריון או טלה בסוס".


1

I assumed it is based on the word הלך, going. Much as we would say inn English, 'I'm going with him' as a term of agreement. I checked Jastrow and he seems to take this route as well. First writing הלך as the שורש, than comparing it to מנהג and translating it accordingly. Practice, adopted opinion, rule. He does the same for הלכתא. He even quotes a Targum ...


0

It is a common talmudic expression (see e.g. Brachos 6b).


0

The earliest source you'll find is in Bemidbar 5:22 where the suspected Sota answers Amen-amen to the Cohen's conditional curses. וּבָאוּ הַמַּיִם הַמְאָרְרִים הָאֵלֶּה בְּמֵעַיִךְ לַצְבּוֹת בֶּטֶן וְלַנְפִּל יָרֵךְ וְאָמְרָה הָאִשָּׁה אָמֵן אָמֵן ‏ The Mishna in Sota 2:5 explains that she's answering Amen to multiple aspects of the curse: עַל ...


6

To add to the other (correct) answers, it is indeed a Yiddish word (פּראָבע), and Weinreich's dictionary translates it as "test, tryout; assay; hallmark; probation; rehearsal". In addition, it has אױף פּראָבע (af probe) meaning "as a test; on trial", which neatly fits into the OP's context. Beinfeld and Bochner's dictionary adds the phrase מאַכן פּראָבע ...


6

it is from the common European word for 'examine, test, prove, try', originally from the Latin word probare (infinitive - 'to try, etc.') and late latin proba (noun for proof, whence our English word 'proof'). It gives us the English word probe, probation (trial, proof, demonstration). It has taken on the meaning 'audition' because the chazan/rabbi is trying ...


7

פּראָבעה is apparently a Yiddish word meaning "test" or "tryout". See Google Translate. I don't actually speak Yiddish, but the etymology is probably from German Probe (approximately pronounced probuh, per Wiktionary), with the same meaning. It is related to the English probe, with both deriving from Latin probare. I can't answer for historical usage.


6

What's the difference between Amalek and his nation? On “Amalek and his nation” Seforno says “who were collected from another people to fight”. I understand him to mean that the “nation” were his in the sense that he assembled them to fight with him but that they were not amalekites (may their name be erased). The Sefer שערי אהרון quotes the שכל טוב to ...



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