Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

There should be no interruption between g'al yisrael and the amidah. This difficulty around the possibility of an interruption is resolved that since the sages instituted this posuk as part of the amidah it is therefore not an interruption. As it stands this posuk is part of the shemonah esray and therefore should be said after the steps are complete


3

See Rabbi Hirsch chapter 6 vs 17. Seems Hashem only used this term to ease Noach's mind while being left to imagine the impending death of millions.


4

For Ch. 6:17 the Torah Sheleimah Vol 2 page 408 note 198 brings the Medrash Raba that VaYigva here means to shrivel. For Ch. 7:21 the Torah Sheleimah Vol 2 page 429 note 79 brings the question and an answer based on the manuscript version of Bava Basra 16b: Only when the Torah uses the terms Geviya and Asifa does it refer to a righteous [painless] death.


0

Shemos 17:25-26: ויאמר משה אכלוהו היום, כי-שבת היום ליהוה: היום, לא תמצאוהו בשדה. ששת ימים, תלקטוהו; וביום השביעי שבת, לא יהיה-בו And Moses said "eat [the Manna] today, as today is a Sabbath for G-d. Today, you will not find it in the field. 6 days collect it, and on the seventh rest, for it will not be there. This verse cannot be interpreted ...


0

Rabbi Dovid Gottlieb suggests that in the original six days of creation time moved faster than today. just like in the embryonic stage one does not need to breathe through his nostrils or eat through his mouth, etc. so you can have a 24 hour day spanning billions of years the rules were different in those embryonic days (we also find for example Kain and ...


8

It's one of 10 traditional exceptions to the rules of BeGeD KePeT recorded by the master masorete Ben Asher in his Dikdukei haTa'amim. Minchat Shai records two homiletic explanations: The second מי כמכה follows God's name and we don't want it to sound like we are declaring God to be a fellow named מיכה. The stronger form in the latter phrase indicates a ...


2

"And it was evening, and it was morning, *one* day"? Also, one can consider that "time started" in the way we know it only at the end of creation with the creation of Shabbat. Thus, only Shabbat has to be considered a 24 hour day. For example the sun moon and stars were created on the fourth "day" so that "before" then could not have been days as ...


-1

The two terms have held different meanings at different times, eg. the Israelites were referred to as a 'goy kadosh' (holy nation) in the Bible, but today the term 'goyim' more frequently is used for non Jews. Language changes over time, and this is true within the Tanakh too, as terms' meanings change as a result of the passing of time between the various ...


6

Malbim from ספר הכרמל entry for גוי: Goy is a gathering of individual entities, without any higher purpose. It is derived from גוה, a body or unit. It is also used as a reference to a large group, which is what it means when used in reference to the Jewish people. Am is a higher level, which references a unified group with a guided purpose, whether it be ...


4

"Shamash" is related to the word "shimush" meaning "use" or "serving". The shamash candle is "serving" the other Chanukah candles by lighting them. Similar to a waiter who "serves" the food. While not in use in common Hebrew, I have heard of a maid being called a "shamash". Likewise, the shul's "caretaker" is called the "shamash" because he serves or ...


0

There are times where a shoresh will mean polar opposites. יסף comes to mind where we see it can mean to end or to continue. Rabbi Hirsch points these out many times. It is possible that ערום is used to both mean uncovered as far as clothing goes and also mean covered as far as hiding a sneaky thought process goes.


2

Targum pseudo Jonathan translates עֲרוּמִּים as wise. The verse reads as follows: והוו תרווהון חכימין אדם ואנתתיה ולא אמתינו ביקרהון And they were both wise, Adam and his wife, and they did not remain in their honor. It is possible, though not evident, that what prompted such a translation is juxtaposition to the serpent's being ערום‏.


1

Except for the Baby Seal's excellent answer, I remember one more explanation. In Judaism the day starts from the evening. For example, Shabbath starts on Friday evening and finishes on Saturday evening. This rule is learned from this very verse you are talking about. You can interpret "one day" as "the same day", meaning that evening and morning belongs to ...


5

While you may not be so satisfied with this answer, I do know of a commentary that discusses the juxtaposed phraseology: the Ibn Ezra. However, he says not to make anything of it, and that it's merely a stylistic device: ופירוש ערום חכם שיעשה דבריו בערמה ואל תתמה בעבור היות ערום אחרי ערומים והם שני טעמים. כי באלה הצחות בלשון כמו בלחי החמור חמור חמורתים ...


5

Funny, I asked myself the same thing last year, and eventually found an interesting answer in the Hertz Chumash. Hertz comments that: The same Hebrew root signifies both 'naked' and 'subtle, clever, mischievous'. Seeming simplicity is often the most dangerous weapon of cunning. The gliding stealthy movements of a serpent is a fitting symbol of the ...


0

Breishis And God called the light day, and the darkness He called night, and it was evening and it was morning, one day. ה. וַיִּקְרָא אֱלֹהִים | לָאוֹר יוֹם וְלַחשֶׁךְ קָרָא לָיְלָה וַיְהִי עֶרֶב וַיְהִי בֹקֶר יוֹם אֶחָד: And God called the expanse Heaven, and it was evening, and it was morning, a second day. ...


4

I remember seeing that rishon, what you are calling an ordinal number, is only in reference to something else, i.e. the day before or the day after, neither of which existed. Therefore echad was used. This is said by the Ramban.


7

Rashi says it is "the day of the One". Because the angels weren't created until day two, God was the only sentient being on this day. Obviously this reason doesn't apply from day two onwards, per Rashi's words. Kli Yakar prefers to say that the verse is asserting that one God created both light/day, and dark/evening, as the Sages would take care to mention ...


5

אור is a singular noun meaning "light". מאורות (expanded form) is a plural noun meaning "[things that] give off light". You are correct in noticing that they share the root of אור.


-3

"The Rebbe" is sufficient. We all know who we are talking about by now when this is said. People sometimes purposely pretend this is ambiguous for whatever personal reason but we all know who we are talking about. The Rebbe is not only the Rebbe for his chassidim but for all yidden. Even other chassidic Rebbes went to him for brochos and advice (btw there ...


0

Shmos 4:3 When Hashem has Moshe throw his staff down, it turns into a Nachash. Here Aharon throws down his own staff and it turns into a Tanin. At the river, Moshe is told take the staff that originally was turned into a nachash on the mountain (his own staff) and warn Par'o. Then in sentence 19, Hashem tells Moshe to tell Aharon to take his staff and ...


2

Kittel is German and means "smock, overall". The ultimate etymology of the German word is debated. See this: http://www.dwds.de/?qu=kittel


0

Good Moed: As referenced above - Rashi - in the concluding Rashi of The Torah quotes maseches "Shabbos" (87a) where HaShem says to Moshe - "יישר כוחך ששברת". Grammatically, the phrase would be pronounced as "Yishar Kochacha" - may your strength be made straight. In the Hoshanos in the Artscroll Siddur, the word is written as "Yishar" - see page 738. Also, ...


3

The Gemara (Sukkah 37B) asks the same question: R. Jeremiah enquired of R. Zerika, Why in the blessing do we say only ‘To take the palm-branch’? — Because it towers above the others. Then why should not one lift up the ethrog and recite the blessing over it? — The reason is, the other answered him, that as a species it naturally towers above all of them. ...


2

There are a number of ways in which hidur is applied to esrog (and acc to the Magein Avraham other mitzvos like seffer torah and shofar as well), all of them enumerated in Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim siman 656 and the Mishna Berurah there. The gemara says to add on a third for hidur mitzvah. This is explained either as meaning a third of it's size or a ...


1

Mehudar (מהודר) can be translated as 'pretty', but is generally used to mean 'above and beyond' what is strictly required. For example, a kosher etrog can be ugly, but there is no problem with using it. A mehudar etrog is a nice one, and generally more expensive also. It's a 'hidur mitzvah' (beautification of the mitzvah) to use a nicer set. Consider also ...


0

It would help if you could cite a few examples. My own surmising based on what I see as a general pattern: "Kakatuv" usually is a "support" or "proof" to the previous statement, as in Kedusha, "Nekadesh et shimcha .... k'shem shemakdishim bishmei marom". How do we know that this is done this way? "Kakatuv ... " Also, it seems that "kakatuv" is often ...


1

From Webster's dictionary: Origin of KITTEL Yiddish kitel, from Middle High German kitel, kietel cotton or hempen outer garment, probably from Arabic qutn cotton I've never seen a hemp kittel. Isn't hemp the stuff they USED to wrap etrogim (or "esroygim" in yeshivish) hat "invented" the "foam"? I would imagine a hemp kittel would be somewhat ...


0

I noticed recently the ramchal uses the same term in his book Derech Hashem (1:1) regarding chakira: ואולם דברים אלה ידענום בקבלה מן האבות ומן הנביאים, והשיגום כל ישראל במעמד הר סיני ועמדו על אמיתותם בבירור, ולמדום לבניהם דור אחר דור כיום הזה, שכן ציום משה רבנו ע"ה מפי הגבורה, "פן תשכח את הדברים אשר ראו עיניך וגו' והודעתם לבניך ולבני בניך" (דברים ד ...



Top 50 recent answers are included