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The correct spelling of the word is חֲלִיפֹות, which is found in 1 Melachim 14:13. The Masoretic Text in Bereishit 45:22 therefore indicates in the margin (the “small Masorah”) that the two appearances of this word in this particular verse are variants (since the Hebrew Bible was written over a thousand year period). Please click to enlarge the image, ...


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When it's chaser it means the objects are similar like by the luchos. The Shevatim are diffrent sizes but Binyamin got 5 of the same size since it was only for him . (Torah Temimah)


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An answer is proposed in the sefer שעשועי על התורה, on this week's parshah. The gemara (Megilah 16a) that says that בנימין got five pieces of clothing, whereas the other brothers only got one apiece, to symbolize that in the future, מרדכי would go out with five pieces of clothing. The Gra asks on this that the symbolism is nice and everything, but how was ...


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The word מַעַן occurs 272 times in Tanach. Most occurrences appear in Devarim (48 occurrences); Yechezkel (37 occurrences); and Tehillim (32 occurrences). The word has several meanings, of which the principal translations are "that" (85 occurrences) and "so" (61 occurrences). The complete listing of all occurrences and their translations in English ...


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It seems that all your definitions collude with the same single definition - "as a consequence / result of" Let's see how this fits into each of your quoted verses: Don't eat chametz. As a result of that, you will remember... The result of someone saying "I will have peace" is that he will be satisfied (i.e. in this verse it is a not a result of not ...


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I think you mean nasha or nashei as is the k'suba formulation (see Rashi on Bava M'tzi'a' 104b, s.v. מקום שנהגו לעשות): ודין נדוניא דהנעלת ליה מבי נשא The expression מבי נשא essentially means "from the house of her father".1 See Tosafos (Shabbos 23b, s.v. דבי נשא דרב שיזבי), who cites a dispute among rishonim regarding whether this phrasing should only ...


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tell your frind to go back to basics. the gemoro Shabbos 21b clearly states that chanuka is a yomtov at the begining of the tikuney zohar chadash writes that chanuka is part of the moadim. saying chag sameach has nothing to do with the gramatical biblical conotation of the words with the root חג. woulldnt have gone down that line! sorry for being so ...


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The Shas political party, which, until his passing in 2013, was spiritually led by R' Ovadia Yosef ammended its charter in 2010 to adpot the World Zionist Organization's New Jerusalem Program and became a member of the WZO. The New Jerusalem Program promotes: Zionism, the national liberation movement of the Jewish people, brought about the establishment ...


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The Chazon Ish "was very positive and hopeful about the presence and prospect of the State [of Israel] and encouraged any way of supporting and upholding it," and "ardently prayed for its success and continued growth." according to R' Zvi Yehuda, in a letter partially reprinted as an article in Tradition in 1979.


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I ran Google translate on ברר which means "find out" and ברור which means "clear". Your description of the activity falls between these two explanations, as it appears that you're doing both. You're exploring the halacha as well as attempting to clarify how halacha clarifies the decisions made. Tough call on this - perhaps "Halachic investigation", ...


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Ramban considered taking possession of and settling the Land of Israel to be a Torah commandment. He listed it as the fourth positive commandment that, in his view, Rambam neglected to include in his Sefer Hamitzvot. ‏... הכל הוא ממצות עשה הוא שנצטויני לרשת הארץ לשבת בה, א"כ היא מצות עשה לדורות מתחייב כל אחד ממנו ואפילו בזמן גלות ...‏ ... ...


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According to most philologists/etymologists, the Biblical Hebrew word חג means something similar to a festive pilgrimage or gathering. It is thus related to the modern similar-sounding Arabic word Hajj, which refers to the Islamic obligatory pilgrimage. In that case, חג is only applicable for the three Biblical holidays when there's an obligation to make a ...


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Apart from the issue of making songs from pessukim referred to in the comments above, and in the Gemoro Sotah 35a מפני מה נענש דוד מפני שקרא לדברי תורה זמירות שנאמר זמירות היו לי חוקיך בבית מגורי Why was Dovid punished (by the death of Uza) because he called the words of Torah "songs" as it says "Your statutes were to me as songs ….. " Tehillim ...


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The word "peley" is probably פלא, which means it is a "wonder" or something amazing or incredible. It often refers to something being very surprising in its novelty. I assume Daniel is correct about "navamina"


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I'm not sure what you mean by "peley", but I imagine that the phrase you are hearing as "navamina" is actually "hava amina," which means "what one would have thought". For example, the Gemara might state a fact that seems obvious, and the person leading the shiur might ask, "What's the hava amina?" In other words, why did the gemara have to say that? What ...


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Cholek comes from the same word as machloket. "He is cholek" means "he argues". Chozer means to retract, so "he is chozer" means "he retracts [his opinion]". Modeh means, in this context, to agree. "He is modeh": he agrees. Gozer is similar to gezera. A gezera is a decree meant to prevent people from coming close to a sin. So, "he is gozer" means "he ...


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Transliterations are hard to decipher, esp. Aramaic transliterations. I see that you have an answer to two of the items. "Osafa" - I am going to assume you meant אסיפא pronounced "Ah-SAY-fah" meaning "on" (or "related to" / "regarding") the ending - namely the ending of a Beriatah, Mishnah, etc. I saw that word near the end of 72a, and I am assuming this is ...


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"Girsha stam" means he divorced her without stating any conditions. Mochel means forgiving, so "he is forgiving the condition" or if you wanted to say it in proper English "he forgives the condition" or "he forgoes the condition." In other words, he waives it (or is presumed to have waived it, depending on the context).


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There are people who don't like saying "Christ", and therefore don't like saying "Christmas." If you don't have a strong secular education, you'd assume that "X" just means "fill-in-the-blank", so "X-mas" sounds like a more "kosher" way to refer to the holiday. (This is what my camp counselors did when I was a kid, and that was their explanation.) As Ze'ev ...


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The word Christ comes from the Greek Χριστός, and the initial letters, ΧΡ (chi rho), was a common abbreviation in handwritten manuscripts and a symbol for Christianity. The English Xmas as an abbreviation of Christmas is long-attested: Xres mæsse appears in the "Anglo-Saxon Chronicle" (c.1100). At some point in English the r was dropped from the ...


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I'll preface this answer with the warning that I never actually learned these gemaras in Kesuvos, but I'll try to answer anyway, based on what I know about gemara learning in general. I think "Yetama" might actually be "Yetoma" (Hebrew: יתומה), which means a female orphan. The יתומה is brought up on Kesuvos 73a for an interesting reason -- a young girl who ...


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דָּחוּק = dachuk. This is a Hebrew past participle meaning "strained" or "forced". It can also be used to mean "implausible". Examples in Yeshivish: I. That explanation is so dachuk ! is equivalent to That explanation is so forced! II. He tried to be metaretz Rabbi Akiva Eiger's kasha on the Taz, but his s'vara was dachuk. is equivalent ...


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The word "dochak" means forced (duchka d'sakina, for example, means the pressure (force) applied by a knife). It usually means that an opinion does not fit so smoothly, either in the reading of the words or in logical follow-through, into the discussion at hand.


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The words you're actually hearing are "man de'amar", or מאן דאמר in Aramaic. "Man" here actually has the same meaning in Aramaic as in English - man. "D'amar" is like the Hebrew שאמר. Translated, it means "who says". The whole phrase together means "the [first/second] one who says". It's often used as a noun when talking about different opinions - "this ...


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The words Shema Yisrael are usually translated as "Hear, Israel" or "Listen, Israel." However, the word appears with a different meaning elsewhere in Tanach: Shmuel 1 15:4: וַיְשַׁמַּע שָׁאוּל אֶת הָעָם, And Shaul gathered the nation Metzudas Tzion there: וישמע" - ענין אסיפה הבאה בשמיעת קול המאסף" Vayishama - gathering that happens ...


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The Sefer Hachinuch interprets this verb as the source that the commandment stated here is to believe in God, and not merely to profess belief in God. His piece on Commandment 417 begins: מצות אחדות השם - שנצטוינו להאמין כי השם יתברך הוא הפועל כל המציאות, אדון הכל, אחד בלי שום שתוף, שנאמר (דברים ו ד) שמע ישראל יי אלהינו יי אחד, וזה מצות עשה הוא, אינה ...


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In the first instance (hap-tip to Joseph for the list) of the use of "האל" in the Torah meaning "these," Bereishit 19:8, Rashi and Ibn Ezra comment on it, both indicating or implying that there's no special significance to this use. Skimming through the Mikraot Gedolot and R' Hirsch (commentaries I have at hand) on this and the other instances, I don't see ...


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The "hear" is critical to this verse, because this word lies in logical parallel to "the Lord our God." The Masoretic Text contains cantillation marks which serve not only to indicate the stress and accents on the Hebrew words, but to provide musical harmony to "sing" the Scripture, which aids in memorization. The way the words are pronounced (based on the ...


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The Idea in Brief In the margin of the Masoretic Text (which is called the "small Masorah") readers will find very important information concerning the word הָאֵל in Deut 4:42, which modifies the plural noun הֶעָרִים. The Masoretes (that is, the people who composed the Masoretic Text of the Hebrew Bible) indicated that the word הָאֵל --with the definite ...


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The Ibn Ezra chapter 37 verse 36 writes שר הטבחים. תמצא זה הלשון על הרג ועל בישול. ודברי המתרגם נכונים. We find the use of this word for killing and for cooking. And the words of the Targum are proper. The fancy edition brings instances of these usages. For the killing option he sends to Daniel 2 14 רב טבחיא די מלכא די נפק לקטלה לחכימי בבל. For the ...


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In Matnas Chaim by R' Matisyahu Salomon he writes that the Menorah represented the Torah, and it was the source of Torah wisdom - thus הרוצה להחכים ידרים (Bava Basra 25b). The kaftor and ferach are described (Shemos 37:17) as being ממנה - from it (the Menorah). Therefore a quality Torah thought is compared to the kaftor vaferach, which were from the ...


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Generally a Mussar Vaad provides a more intense and personal level of engagement with an eye to self improvement, thus it usually consists of a small group of students. A Mussar Vaad can take many forms. It can take the form of a classic "shmuess"- lecture, which is given traditionally by the Mashgiach or Rosh Yeshiva of the yeshiva which focuses on either ...


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DanF got it right. "Tabach" means "butcher." Modern Hebrew has confused that with cooking a bit, a kitchen is called a "mitbach", again, old-fashioned cooks had to slaughter their own stuff. As for the Sar Hatabachim, Ramban says we don't know if his job was butchering animals, or if he was an executioner! (The latter would make sense as the guy has his own ...


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@Gershon Gold is correct that the term for cooking is בישול. Refer to the Targum and Peirush Yonatan on Breishit 43:16, where Yosef uses the term טבוח טבח. There, Peirush Yonatan says that this refers to "slaughtering" or "butchering" a goat. So, your original assumption seems correct that the Sar Hatabahim was the chief butcher. As to how the term "מטבח" ...


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Shaare Efrayim 8:60 and many other works cite the custom to call an esteemed person for this aliya. Perhaps "rabi" is used in the formula because it's typically a rabbi (as indeed it is in my own experience).


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The Rosh in Niddah ch. 8 siman 8 writes the following: דבדרבמן הולך אחר המיקל וכל שכן בכתמים In Rabbinical rules we follow the lenient opinion, and certainly by kesamim. The Divrei Chamudos אות צ there sources this comment to the last line of the previous Siman of the Rosh, in which the Rosh quoted the following: כל שיעורי חכמים להחמיר חוץ ...


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The simplest explanation for this concept is "Like a blind man (finding) in a trap door (in an attic)" To expand on that: much like a blind man cannot find his way out of a room without help*, and if he did it by himself it was just pure luck, so too are these שחיטות that came out good -- you can't use these to prove that someone who doesn't know הלכות ...


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The First Temple period is still covered by Tanakh. Tanakh finishes off just as they've gotten the Second Temple going. Yes, there are broad categories. Timewise, we refer to the following periods, very roughly: Tannaim -- those who wrote the first stage of the Talmud (e.g. the Mishna). This starts in the early second Temple period (though we don't have a ...


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Certainly appears to be a term of recent vintage. R. Chaim Ozer Grodzensky used the term in a 1907 teshuvah to Australia, although he uses it to refer to conversion law, and not Hilkhot Niddah (Achiezer 3:27): הנה שמחתי לראות מכתב מנהלי עדת ישרון בק' פעסט כי לא אלמן ישראל גם בקצה ארץ הגולה אוסטרליא הנדחה והנעזבה מישוב ישראלי גדול מאנשים ישרים שומרי משמרת ...


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This answer is a summary of Rabbi Jachter's writeup on this subject. He provides four (and a half) justifications for why putting pesukim to music is permissible. The first is that the prohibition was only for Shir Hashirim, because if it is put to music, it is more prone to being misinterpreted as a simple love song. (suggested but not accepted by Igrot ...


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There's a Sefer by that name from 90 years ago - תרפג/1923. A search of HebrewBooks.org seems to show that the term was not used [much] earlier. A search of Toras Emeth Software indicates that it's not used in any of the classics (Mishna, Gemara, Rambam, Shulchan Aruch) and the earliest it finds is from the קיצור ש''ע ילקוט יוסף - the 2nd half of the 20th ...


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Sanhedrin 101a תנו רבנן הקורא פסוק של שיר השירים ועושה אותו כמין זמר והקורא פסוק בבית משתאות בלא זמנו מביא רעה לעולם מפני שהתורה חוגרת שק ועומדת לפני הקב"ה ואומרת לפניו רבונו של עולם עשאוני בניך ככנור שמנגנין בו לצים ה"ג הקורא שיר השירים ועושה אותו כמין זמר. שקורא בנגינה אחרת שאינו נקוד בה ועושה אותה כמין שיר אע"פ שמשיר השירים הוא ועיקרו שיר אסור ...


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Rashi himself asks and answers this question! On 32:9, he writes that his purpose is to provide a direct quote of Hashem for the sake of his argument/plea: ואלהי אבי יצחק: ולהלן הוא אומר (לא מב) ופחד יצחק, ועוד מהו שחזר והזכיר שם המיוחד, היה לו לכתוב האומר אלי שוב לארצך וגו'. אלא כך אמר יעקב לפני הקב"ה שתי הבטחות הבטחתני אחת בצאתי מבית אבי מבאר שבע, ...



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