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צור חבלי בעת צרה is an idiomatic expression. "צור חבלי" means literally "my rope's rock". It is referring to an anchor. So the plain translation (meaning according to peshat) is "My anchor in times of trouble." There are many ways to give it allegorical meaning as well as according to the Kabbalistic interpretations. But all these other meanings must relate ...


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I have looked into this a little in the past, so I can't recall particular sources, but the gist of it is as follows: Some wish to translate it as in "חבל נחלתו" and many other instances in which it is used to mean "my lot" or "my portion in life". This would parallel the other phrase "מנת כוסי" in the next line. "צור חבלי" would then mean "the Rock who is ...


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The Kehot Annotated Siddur translates it as "the strength of my lot in times of distress". The "my lot" would be like Devarim 32:9: יַעֲקֹב, חֶבֶל נַחֲלָתוֹ Jacob the lot of His inheritance The Siddur Shay Lamorah quotes Iyun Tefilah that it means that He is my Rock and Refuge (מעוז) to save me from the pains which grab me at a time of trouble. ...


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A possible interpretation can be gleaned from the posuk in Yechezkel 27:8 where the term rope is used metaphorically to signify the ones steering the ship. And in Shmuel II 8:2 ropes are used metaphorically to signify control over life and death. Thus in keeping with the theme of the piyut that Hashem is “Master of the world”, we praise Hashem by ...


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I noticed that the root form of חֶבלִי is חבל meaning "rope". However, I also did a Google translate on the full word חֶבלִי and it displayed the synonym נָחוּת which has one translation as "disadvantaged". This makes sense, in this context, as the word "chaval" is often said to someone when a tragedy or danger is mentioned. See also this site which gives a ...


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Halacha Sefarim bring this down, including: The Ben Ish Chai: וכשאומר בעל גבורות ידגיש העי"ן שלא יבולע ויהיה כאומר בל גבורות ח"ו וכנז' בחס"ל


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I don't know about the mantis, but I the ladybug was explained by Philologos, The Forward's language columnist. The British call it the ladybird, originally "our Lady's bird", with the "lady" referring to Mary, the mother of Jesus. Most other European languages used similarly religious themed names for the insect: French: la bête á bon dieu (“the dear ...


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R. Shlomo Kluger in his sefer Imrei Shefer here says that גוים refer to the nations of the world, and לאומים refer to Yisrael.


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In the Bavli to that Mishna (Gittin 80a), 'Ula explains that the reason there was an enactment made to write the date according to the local government was "משום שלום מלכות" "to maintain peace with the government". Rashi explains that the governments would see we use their dating system and assume that we value their leadership. Accordingly, Rambam rules ...


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The only place in the Torah where the Hebrew word for "axe" appears is in Deut. 19:5. The paragraph is regarding someone who unintentionally killed someone. Such a person is told to flee to a city of refuge where the "blood avenger" is not permitted to kill him. (Without delving into details, this is one of the few situations where the Torah allows ...


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While I can't claim to know exactly what these things mean, I can translate the Hebrew for you1: שמירה means protection הצלחה means success זווג הגון means [finding] a good spouse שלום בית means "peace in the house," usually specific to husband and wife זרע בר קיימא means "living children," specifically children who will survive childhood [common now, but ...


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He asked: "is there a place for a spend-the-night." Lin is a noun. It means "one night's lodgings." She replied: "there is a place to lodge." Lun is a verb, "to lodge."


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שלחן ערוך ס"א:ג בִּקְרִיאַת שְׁמַע יֵשׁ רמ''ה תֵּבוֹת, וּכְדֵי לְהַשְׁלִים רמ''ח כְּנֶגֶד אֵיבָרָיו שֶׁל אָדָם, מְסַיֵּם שְׁלִיחַ צִבּוּר (ב) ה' אֱלֹקיכֶם אֱמֶת, וְחוֹזֵר וְאוֹמֵר בְּקוֹל רָם ה' אֱלֹהֵיכֶם אֱמֶת:‏ In shema there are 245 words, and in order to get to 248 words (corresponding to the number of bones in a human body), the ...


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The word נפש is not limited to mean strictly "souls." It often means something along the lines of "life force" or "being." When someone kills someone else, the Torah refers to it as having struck the נפש - as in אדרוש את נפש האדם of Bereishit 9, or מכה נפש of Bamidbar 35, or רצחו נפש of Devarim 22. נפש תחת נפש (Vayikra 24) seems to mean "a life for a ...


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I asked a fellow in Shul this morning this question, and he showed me a fascinating Medrash Raba. Medrash Raba Vayeira 56 third line from the top. Avaraham prayed at Mount Moriah after he was told not to sacrifice Yitzchak that Hashem should have Mercy on the Jews even if due to sin they are not deserving of it . ר' יוחנן אמר: אמר לפניו רבון העולמים ...


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I believe the term is based on .גמרא נדה נט where the גמרא discusses being strict / lenient with כתמים which are דרבנן. אמר רבינא לא להקל על דברי תורה אלא להחמיר על דברי תורה וכתמים עצמן דרבנן See רש"י there who elaborates further. Another גמרא has a closer expression: :נידה סא לא הותרו בגדי צבעונין לאשה אלא להקל על כתמיהן


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This bothered me too. Not just concerning Avraham, but by many of the situations mentioned in 'Mi Sh'ana', we never find the people mentioned actually praying or asking anything of Hashem. The answer I've told myself is based on an Or HaChaim in Shmos chapter 2 vs 23-24. The Torah tells us that the cries of the Jews from their work went up to Hashem And ...


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You can go here http://www.chabad.org/library/bible_cdo/aid/63255/jewish/The-Bible-with-Rashi.htm and copy in english or hebrew words in the search box. You can then count the results or actually visit each sentence in situ.


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In Hebrew numbers are written out in their component parts; there's no Hebrew word for "990", for example, but the torah writes instead "90 and 900" (or sometimes "900" and "90") as separate words. Everywhere in the torah that you see numbers in the hundreds or thousands, you'll see this formation. As for "ben", this is a Hebrew convention when talking ...


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R' Samson Rapahel Hirsch, in his commentary on this verse, explains (as alluded to in the question) that "קלל" refers to "decreasing the material means of a person or thing" ("lightening" them, like in the root "קל"), while "ארר" refers to a deeper curse, "internally and intensively, to rob somebody of the abilities for their inner life." Other nations can't ...


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כלי יקר explains: "קלל" means "disparage" or "curse" whereas "ארר" means "ostracize and curse". If a dishonorable person disparages an honorable person, mere disparagement would be insufficient retribution, as it wouldn't affect the perpetrator: he doesn't mind such disparagement. Rather, he'd need ארר as retribution.



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