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7

In the Sefer Avnei Yashfei 4:109:2 was asked if a sefer Torah fell inside the Aron Kodesh does one have to fast. He writes that one does not have to fast(there is more savoros but put in whats applicable here), the main reason being that it is not a place for walking like the Atzei HaLevanon 2:71 writes(he is quoted in previous part of tshuva regarding some ...


6

As @DanF pointed out in the comments, the root meaning appears to be 'to cover', in a literal sense ('to smear') or a metaphorical sense ('to replace', 'to atone'). Gesenius and BDB say as much. Thus you also have kaporet (Ex. 25:17) which covers the ark, or kopher, the henna plant (Song of Songs 2:14) which is made into a paste and smeared over hands and ...


5

I'm not sure if "anyone has ever conducted a study" of what some scholars consider to be aggada and others do not. However, we should be wary of such black and white distinctions, and of assuming that just because a passage is quoted in the Ein Yaakov, R. Yaakov Chaviva thought it should fit squarely into the "aggada" box. There are passages that the ...


4

The last Mishna Berura in סימן נג [regarding "דין הראוי לירד לפני התבה"] (s'if katan פז) addresses your question. וקורין שליח-צבור חזן, שצריך לראות האיך יקרא, ותרגום "וירא" וחזי And we call the prayer-leader a חזן, because he has to see how to pray properly, and the [Aramaic] translation of "וירא" (to see) is "וחזי" (Translation mine) This ...


4

Looking at several baby naming websites, you will find that Isaac is correct. The meaning given to the English name Jebediah is given as "Friend of the Lord," or in Hebrew ידיד י-ה. Even the sites that do not source it as a variant of Jedediah explain its meaning this way - see here. Regarding Jebediah being its own term, Malbim does not have such a word ...


4

The Magen Avraham (44, 5) refers to the custom of fasting if a sefer torah or tefillin fall onto the ground. He does indeed use the words 'al haaretz'. (Seemingly the only difference between sefer torah or tefillin in this law is that one fasts for a sefer torah falling even if it was in its wrapping/container.) The Mishna Berura cites the Magen Avraham (40, ...


3

I don't believe that there's a 'one size fits all' answer to the more general question of how we define a floor in halakha, but we may be able to extrapolate a few principles. We can import a halakha from the laws of shabbos (and sukka): levud. This means that anything withing 3 tefachim is considered attached. If a step etc. is raised slightly off the ...


2

As far as I'm aware, there is no well-accepted posek who would permit this. Even R. Abadi, who has many unusual opinions and allows recitation of a shorter version of Birkas Hamazon, implies in that teshuvah that one cannot arbitrarily shorten the Shemoneh Esre. While additions to anyone's personal prayers are allowed (see Shulchan Aruch O.C. 119), this is ...


2

This YUTorah shiur by Rabbi Yitzchok Twersky discusses the meaning of the word "hevel" "הבל" as it is used in קוהלת (Ecclesiastes), and how it relates to the name. Extreme simplification of the lecture follows. Rabbi Twersky quotes the Vilna Gaon as writing that the word "הבל" in קוהלת is a pointer to the story of הבל (Abel) in Genesis. He said that the ...


2

Its from Masheches Brachos 28b which brings a braisah which discusses a story when Rabbi Eliezer became sick his talmidim asked him how does one merit olam haba ,He answered a few things and ends of off with the phrase when you pray know who you are standing before. Rashi explains: דעו לפני מי וכו' - כדי שתתפללו ביראה ובכוונה.


2

It means "known sins". The article is saying that if the talmud chacham knows that he has sinned, then he must fast (to help atone for his sins).


2

Brachot 13a: תני בר קפרא כל הקורא לאברהם אברם עובר בעשה Bar Kaparah says someone who calls Avraham Avram "passes over" a positive commandment I infer, then, that this is problematic. Since the Gemarrah uses a "long" expression "Passes over a positive commandment" rather than stating "he sinned", it seems to mean that the person missed an ...


1

Technically speaking, there is no concept in halacha of a word which simply cannot be used under any circumstances (with the partial exception of God's name). The furthest Jewish law in this regard is to encourage using a 'cleaner' way of expressing an idea if this is as efficient as the less 'clean' manner. The Talmud (Pesachim 3b) states, "Whenever they ...


1

The Rivevos Ephraim 2:98 holds its a hefsek and he should not be the Baal koreh for this aliah. Halachicly speaking has alot of sources on this,including this one.


1

The words apparently appear in a number of places. This site sources them, in the plural, to the talmud, Brachot 28b.


1

While the following source is not a modern Posek, it still may be of interest. R' Yehuda Hachasid writes in Sefer Chasidim (ch.158) "When you pray, add your own needs to the formula of each Bracha according to its topic, because this increases your concentration. And if you can't add on to every Bracha because the congregation finishes earlier, add on to one ...


1

I doubt there are any extant historical records to the effect, but it certainly seems plausible that in traditionally antisemitic Medieval Christendom, the abbreviation of "Judean" to "Jew" had derogatory undertones similar to other contemporary racial slurs, e.g. for Chinese or Japanese persons. This only seems more so the case considering that the word's ...


1

No. There isn't really an issue in writing or erasing 'God' See: http://doseofhalacha.blogspot.co.uk/2014/07/god-or-g-d.html There is no issue in writing or printing Hashem’s name properly, providing one knows that it won’t be destroyed. Rambam (Yesodei Hatorah 6:1) writes that there are 7 sheimos (names of Hashem) that mustn’t be erased. There is ...



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