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14

It's one of 10 traditional exceptions to the rules of BeGeD KePeT recorded by the master masorete Ben Asher in his Dikdukei haTa'amim. Minchat Shai records two homiletic explanations: The second מי כמכה follows God's name and we don't want it to sound like we are declaring God to be a fellow named מיכה. The stronger form in the latter phrase indicates a ...


7

Malbim from ספר הכרמל entry for גוי: Goy is a gathering of individual entities, without any higher purpose. It is derived from גוה, a body or unit. It is also used as a reference to a large group, which is what it means when used in reference to the Jewish people. Am is a higher level, which references a unified group with a guided purpose, whether it be ...


7

Rashi says it is "the day of the One". Because the angels weren't created until day two, God was the only sentient being on this day. Obviously this reason doesn't apply from day two onwards, per Rashi's words. Kli Yakar prefers to say that the verse is asserting that one God created both light/day, and dark/evening, as the Sages would take care to mention ...


6

The Malbim to Shemos 22, brought here in Sefer HaKarmel, explains as follows: ארר refers to the ramifications of the curse, that it causes a loss or detriment to the person or belongings of the accursed from the cursor. Therefore, curses from Hashem are always ארורים. On the other hand, קלל is just the expression of the curse. Therefore, says the Malbim, ...


5

While you may not be so satisfied with this answer, I do know of a commentary that discusses the juxtaposed phraseology: the Ibn Ezra. However, he says not to make anything of it, and that it's merely a stylistic device: ופירוש ערום חכם שיעשה דבריו בערמה ואל תתמה בעבור היות ערום אחרי ערומים והם שני טעמים. כי באלה הצחות בלשון כמו בלחי החמור חמור חמורתים ...


5

Funny, I asked myself the same thing last year, and eventually found an interesting answer in the Hertz Chumash. Hertz comments that: The same Hebrew root signifies both 'naked' and 'subtle, clever, mischievous'. Seeming simplicity is often the most dangerous weapon of cunning. The gliding stealthy movements of a serpent is a fitting symbol of the ...


5

אור is a singular noun meaning "light". מאורות (expanded form) is a plural noun meaning "[things that] give off light". You are correct in noticing that they share the root of אור.


4

For Ch. 6:17 the Torah Sheleimah Vol 2 page 408 note 198 brings the Medrash Raba that VaYigva here means to shrivel. For Ch. 7:21 the Torah Sheleimah Vol 2 page 429 note 79 brings the question and an answer based on the manuscript version of Bava Basra 16b: Only when the Torah uses the terms Geviya and Asifa does it refer to a righteous [painless] death.


4

I remember seeing that rishon, what you are calling an ordinal number, is only in reference to something else, i.e. the day before or the day after, neither of which existed. Therefore echad was used. This is said by the Ramban.


4

"Shamash" is related to the word "shimush" meaning "use" or "serving". The shamash candle is "serving" the other Chanukah candles by lighting them. Similar to a waiter who "serves" the food. While not in use in common Hebrew, I have heard of a maid being called a "shamash". Likewise, the shul's "caretaker" is called the "shamash" because he serves or ...


3

See Rabbi Hirsch chapter 6 vs 17. Seems Hashem only used this term to ease Noach's mind while being left to imagine the impending death of millions.


3

The Gemara (Sukkah 37B) asks the same question: R. Jeremiah enquired of R. Zerika, Why in the blessing do we say only ‘To take the palm-branch’? — Because it towers above the others. Then why should not one lift up the ethrog and recite the blessing over it? — The reason is, the other answered him, that as a species it naturally towers above all of them. ...


2

Yirmiyahu - Jeremiah - Chapter 8 How do you say, "We are wise, and the Law of the Lord is with us"? Verily, behold it is in vain, he made a false scribes' pen. ח. אֵיכָה תֹאמְרוּ חֲכָמִים אֲנַחְנוּ וְתוֹרַת יְהֹוָה אִתָּנוּ אָכֵן הִנֵּה לַשֶּׁקֶר עָשָׂה עֵט שֶׁקֶר סֹפְרִים: (Rashi translation) Verily, behold it is in vain: Behold your wisdom is in ...


2

Kittel is German and means "smock, overall". The ultimate etymology of the German word is debated. See this: http://www.dwds.de/?qu=kittel


2

There are a number of ways in which hidur is applied to esrog (and acc to the Magein Avraham other mitzvos like seffer torah and shofar as well), all of them enumerated in Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim siman 656 and the Mishna Berurah there. The gemara says to add on a third for hidur mitzvah. This is explained either as meaning a third of it's size or a ...


2

"And it was evening, and it was morning, *one* day"? Also, one can consider that "time started" in the way we know it only at the end of creation with the creation of Shabbat. Thus, only Shabbat has to be considered a 24 hour day. For example the sun moon and stars were created on the fourth "day" so that "before" then could not have been days as ...


2

Targum pseudo Jonathan translates עֲרוּמִּים as wise. The verse reads as follows: והוו תרווהון חכימין אדם ואנתתיה ולא אמתינו ביקרהון And they were both wise, Adam and his wife, and they did not remain in their honor. It is possible, though not evident, that what prompted such a translation is juxtaposition to the serpent's being ערום‏.


1

Shemos 17:25-26: ויאמר משה אכלוהו היום, כי-שבת היום ליהוה: היום, לא תמצאוהו בשדה. ששת ימים, תלקטוהו; וביום השביעי שבת, לא יהיה-בו And Moses said "eat [the Manna] today, as today is a Sabbath for G-d. Today, you will not find it in the field. 6 days collect it, and on the seventh rest, for it will not be there. This verse cannot be interpreted ...


1

Except for the Baby Seal's excellent answer, I remember one more explanation. In Judaism the day starts from the evening. For example, Shabbath starts on Friday evening and finishes on Saturday evening. This rule is learned from this very verse you are talking about. You can interpret "one day" as "the same day", meaning that evening and morning belongs to ...


1

Mehudar (מהודר) can be translated as 'pretty', but is generally used to mean 'above and beyond' what is strictly required. For example, a kosher etrog can be ugly, but there is no problem with using it. A mehudar etrog is a nice one, and generally more expensive also. It's a 'hidur mitzvah' (beautification of the mitzvah) to use a nicer set. Consider also ...


1

From Webster's dictionary: Origin of KITTEL Yiddish kitel, from Middle High German kitel, kietel cotton or hempen outer garment, probably from Arabic qutn cotton I've never seen a hemp kittel. Isn't hemp the stuff they USED to wrap etrogim (or "esroygim" in yeshivish) hat "invented" the "foam"? I would imagine a hemp kittel would be somewhat ...



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