Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

I am impressed by the gravity of your inquiry and your care in the matter in that you are seeking real answers to a complicated question. May Hashem help the two of you and anyone else in need of this post. First let's address some issues your question raised in this case, and then let's address the Halachic ramifications. The OP states that your wife is ...


0

perhaps better had you not asked but here it is "But anyone who sins presumptuously, whether native-born or foreigner, blasphemes the LORD and will be cut off from the people of Israel" Numbers 15:30 you can expect incurring divine wrath on yourself possibly in this world and certainly in the hereafter


-6

In my opinion, you have identified the problem when you said: She feels that these laws were developed by men, long ago, and that it's a huge burden. and: So we both feel that it is kind of hypocritical [...]. Ultimately you and your wife would have to answer these two questions to your own satisfaction, including whatever moral standard you ...


10

Halachically, you transgress a biblical commandment if you knowingly have relations with a niddah, and the punishment is karet. See this answer, which cites Rambam Laws of Prohibitions on Relations 4:3. According to Rambam Issurei Biah 1:1 (h/t DoubleAA), punishments for forbidden relations apply to both except in a special case not applicable here. By ...


5

In general, only one status is needed to be listed. For a Jewish born virgin, besulah is written because she is due 200 zuz upon divorce/death of husband. For a Jewish born "widow" (I'm not sure why you wrote "woman"), almanah is written because she is due 100 zuz upon termination of the marriage. For a Jewish born divorcee, gerushah is written because even ...


2

The Yalkut Yosef (Shabbat 296:13) holds that women are equally obligated for the mitzvah of havdalah as men are, and can therefore say all of the blessings and drink from the wine to fulfill the mitzvah for themselves. In the footnote for this halacha, R. Yosef adds that this is like the law for kiddush (as hazoriz stressed). Although the Yalkut Yosef does ...


7

R' C Cohen writes in Dose of Halacha .. There is another machlokes as to whether women are obligated at all. Ramban (Kiddushin 34a) holds that women are obligated, while Rambam (Temidin Umusafin 7:24; Sefer Hamitzvot 161) and the Magen Avraham (OC 489:1) hold that as it is a time-bound mitzva, women are exempt. The Mishna Berura (489:3) quotes the ...


2

Obviously -- for practical matters please consult a local rabbi. Or sometimes the bigger guns must be brought in, and consult (and abide by!) a bigger posek. But here's some theory on the subject. Rabbi Moshe Feinstein -- Igros Moshe OC2:21 -- addresses a shul making changes to its custom. (Though with regards to Hallel on Seder nights, he suggests that in ...


2

Not having been present at that shiur (nor by any by Rav Schachter on related topics), it's hard to say precisely what might have been meant...but I'll hazard a guess. Nowhere in your question did you mention that Rav Schachter would support female dayanim, which I think may be the point you're confusing. Unless something in the context of the shiur you ...


2

Rav Nissim Karelitz, based on the Ramban and Ritva in Niddah 13a, holds Chut Shani on Even HaEzer siman 21that there is an issur for a woman to entertain or cause sexual thoughts. The issur is "de'megarei yetzer hara be'nafsheyhu" and not "ve'nishmartah mikol davar rah". The reason why ve'nishmartah does not apply is because there is no issur of wasting ...


1

Rav moshe says (even Ezer Chelek 1 siman 69) that while it's a violation of BOTH lo tasuru AND vinishmarta mikol davar ra (since it leads to shichvat zera levatala) for a man, for a woman would STILL be in violation of lo tasuru EVEN THOUGH there is no concern for zera. So Rav Moshe clearly rules that it's ossur.



Top 50 recent answers are included