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Historically, there were many wome who studied Torah. Currently, we have women who teach Torah, and Rabbi Avi Weiss has given some women the title "Rabbanit". Women are allowed to be mashgichot (kosher supervisors), so, I assume that they are learning some parts of Yoreh De'ah to know what to do. I am citing these as examples of what appears to be a ...


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Women can lean definitely Pirkei Avot & Shulchan Aruch (why not?). On the contrary - women are obligated to know their halachic obligations and there is no other way for that other than studying Torah.


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The source of immersing before prayer or studying Torah was an enactment by Ezra for the purpose of limiting conjugal relations between a husband and wife by requiring immersion if they had a seminal emission during / after relations. The original enactment also applied to women and to involuntary emissions. It had nothing to do with ritual purity, but was ...


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The reason that a Jew can take a nonjewish married lady is because there is no ishus for nonjews. This would not apply to a married Jewish lady obviously, but leaves the question open to an unmarried one. In general many of the halachos drashos and psukim all revolve around the assumption that we are dealing specifically with a non jew, but the fact that no ...


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רמב"ם Hilchos Isurei Biah 4:4 writes הגויים--אין חייבין עליהם משום נידה Non-Jews – one is not culpable for violations of Niddah with them … However (although this wasn't the question), there is a non-Niddah Kares for relations with a non-Jew (h/t to DoubleAA) - Even HaEzer 16:2 הבא על העובדת כוכבים, אם לא פגעו בו קנאים ולא הלקוהו בית דין, הרי ...


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In your question you gave an explanation for the yuhara of her wearing the tzitzis. And i quote "However, a woman wearing one would have such a denigrating effect, because the Rabbis are all wearing one." It seemed like you were still quoting the Ramma. In fact the Ramma gives no explanation. I will send you to another Ramma which can be used to either ...


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In the Zohar it gives two related interpretations of this verse. First, the context it places this in is that this is a reference to The Jewish People as the Eishes Chayil. Within that, her husband is a reference to Hashem. Known in the gates, the Zohar then gives two ways to understand. One is שערים related to the word השערה - estimation. We can't truly ...


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I will add to meir and Yitzchak only because they didnt quote chazal. See Brachos 17a and Sota 21a, women get their zchus Torah by taking their children to yeshiva and waiting for their husbands till they return from Beis Medrash.


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Some sources that men and women are obligated in mayim acharonim are given in a comment to Women and Mayim Acharonim. They are: Ben Ish Chai, First Year, Parshat Shelach, #11 and Halacha Berurah 181:1. Halichipedia says that both men and women are obligated in mayim acharonim and gives the following sources: Torah Chaim Sofer 181:1, Sh"t Shalmat Chaim ...


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The Levush 17:2 holds its prohibited based off the issur of shmolas beged ish(wearing clothing of the opposite gender) Targum Yonasan says the same. The Biur Gra 38:3 held its assur.


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It says very clearly in the zohar that there is no issur of speaking to a dead tzadik auviously it must be a real tzadik wich he undoubtedly was. if a breslover didnt go on rh that would be a lack of emuna in the words of the tremendous tzadik.


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The Mishna Berura (301 sk 158) quotes an argument among Rishonim and Achronim about whether a woman who finds Tefillin in public on Shabbat may wear them as amulets to "carry" them back to a safe place. The debate centers around defining normal modes of wearing clothing. He doesn't cite anyone who suggests that the Rama's exhortation (OC 38:3) of "מוחין ...


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My own understanding based on the shuir linked below From a kabbalistic perspective colors are associated with different sephirot (aspects of how God relates to the world). Though this is not a literal association, meaning the sephira of Chochma is not white/silver there is an inyan of using physical manifestations to tap into or associate with a ...


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Ovadia Yosef holds that women, married and unmarried, ideally cover their heads when they say shem u'malchut, regardless of location or others' presence. In a Yeminite shul, unmarried women will be asked to cover their heads and I have seen unmarried Yeminite women cover their heads to light and bless Chanukah candles. For those who are interested in the ...


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It's confusing to me that no one cites the next line of this Gemara (Yoma 47a) which I have helpfully put in bold below: Tanu Rabanan: Kimchit had seven sons and all of them served as Kohen Godol. The Sages said to her: "What did you do to merit this?" She replied: "The walls of my house never saw the hairs on my head" Replied the Sages: "Many women have ...


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Nowadays, people are usually careful that the woman starts taking hormone regulation pills (birth control pills) before the wedding in order to make sure that she will not be menstrually impure at the time of the wedding. She then stops taking the pills after she and her husband are together for the first time.


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Yes, Orthodox Jewish practice involves a married couple separating for approximately 12 days a month during months that the wife is having her normal menstrual cycle, ending in the wife visiting the Mikvah to end the status requiring the separation. Before the wedding, similar preparations are made. If for some reason (and it happens) that doesn't work out ...


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The ביאור הלכה in סימן קצט ד"ה ויוצאות says from the יד קטנה that a woman may not lead the zimun on behalf of men who are מחויב. Moreover he writes that the women must hear the zimun from a man, implying that three women at such a meal could not form their own zimun, following the rules of division of zimun found in סימן קצג סעיף א. However the מ"ב ס"ק יח ...


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The Tur indicates that a number of these apply to the woman (EH 25): Nidah - The woman would at least share responsibility. Shichrus - This applies if either spouse is intoxicated. Chatzufa - This applies specifically to a woman who verbally propositions her husband in an explicit manner. The Aruch HaShulchan (EH 25:9) mentions that m'riva refers to ...



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