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Of course a woman can be a tzaddik, which just means a righteous person. (Though grammatically the term would technically be "tzadeket" since that is the feminine form of the word.) All the matriarchs and heroines of scripture and Rabbinic writings are traditionally considered "tzadikim". In fact, the first mishna in Perek Chelek of Tractate Sanhedrin ...


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The Mishna (Sanhedrin 8:1) says the the word "son" is used intentionally to exclude a daughter, in this case. The Talmud (Sanhedrin 69b-70a) says that while it would be reasonable to also punish a wayward daughter, it is a divine decree that it is not so.


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A Yo'etzet Halakhah is there to answer questions that are going unasked because some women are understandably embarrassed to raise them with a male rabbi. They can also find answers that wouldn't cross a man's mind simply because the territory is more familiar. The only halachic decisions they give are ones where the questioner's community has a well ...


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Yoatzot halacha as I understand it are taught about the halachot of niddah in depth and often know a good deal about female reproductive biology (I am unclear how much of this is part of the training program and how much is learned elsewhere by women drawn to the program, such as physicians). They often serve an entire town rather than a single shul. They ...


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Just converting it to an answer, with the added Chikuni. Hebrew is a gendered language, and uses the masculine as the default. Here's is Chizkuni's commentary to Genesis 1:27: We shall fashion an Adam ... human in old French, i.e. "let us make a man and a woman." The proof text is later: "God called them adam the day they were created." We also find ...


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Yes. Because then the possessive pronoun ־ה (which is feminine) and its antecedent אדם (which is masculine) wouldn't agree in gender. (Word gender. Not sex of the referent.) That would break a standard rule of Hebrew grammar. Perhaps you meant to propose instead that it should be בין אשה לחבירה. But then it would exclude men, by the long tradition in ...


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The most common custom is that there is no special duty for a single girl to light Shabbos lights at all. If anyone but the married woman of the house is lighting, the tradition is to light two. Including if a wife isn't home and the husband is lighting. Or your case. The Lubavitcher rebbe invented the practice of all girls lighting. It hasn't been going on ...


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Why is there so much focus on modesty? Because it greatly increases the physical attraction between husband and wife (in a modest society, a man only sees the most attractive parts of a woman's body when the woman is his wife). This strengthens and stabilizes the family, which is the core of Jewish society. Why is there so much focus on womens' ...


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With candles, their's a large variety of customs, so this is only a partial answer. Until marriage, girls light one candle. http://m.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1221742/jewish/Do-Young-Girls-Light-Shabbat-and-Holiday-Candles.htm This is from the lubavitcher Rebbe. Unfortunately, I can't find the exact source of the article, but I heard the ...


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The issue would seem to be covering one's head during prayer or blessings (in this case the blessing on the candles). Rabbi Adir Hakohen of Yeshivat Kisse Rahamim quotes Rav Ovadiah z"l (Yabia Omer vol. 6 ch. 15) here as holding that the custom today is for unmarried girls to not cover their heads during blessings, and they have halachic backing for this, ...


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I'll preface this ridiculously long answer by echoing the OP of answering with disinterest. The Gemara only ever uses the term guf naki when discussing someone putting on tefillin. There are two main ways that the Talmudic sages and broader rabbinic literature have understood the term "a clean body": As a Spiritual Condition For the Meiri (Beit ...


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that it is regarding flatulence Tractate Shabbath 49A R. Jannai said: Tefillin demand a pure body, like Elisha, the man of wings. What does this mean? — Abaye said: That one must not pass wind while wearing them; Raba said: That one must not sleep in them. sleeping is easy but flatulence is a problem shulchan aruch harav 28.5 the reason men do ...


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The Maharsham (vol. 3 ch. 206) writes: ובדין הכלה תוך ז״י המשחה ומלאכתה לחפור בגדים אם מותר לה לתפור בביתה הדבר פשוט לענ״ד שאם בעלה מסכים לזה אין חשש כלל דמצות התורה הוא על החתן שישמח אשתו וגם בזה יש דיעות דמהני מחילתה And regarding the case of a bride within the seven days of festivity, whose job is sewing clothing, addressing the issue of whether it ...



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