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12

Chabad.org has an article by Yael Levine Katz about three women with connections to Tzfas (Safed) that either were kabbalists, or exhibited kabbalist-like characteristics. Francesa Sarah mentioned by R' Chaim Vital, was said to have had a maggid, or angelic tutor. Fioretta Modena Channah Rochel Werbemacher or "The Maiden of Ludmir" who gathered something ...


12

Thank you and welcome to the site. We hope this is a theoretical question; however, Judaism covers the difficult cases too. First off, this isn't pleasant to bring up, but not all forms of rape would be of halachic consequence to the question at hand; but we'll assume here that this was conventional full penetration, which would present an issue. The Kohen ...


11

First things first, You're human. You can't help being attracted to women, Gd made you that way. Only the whens and wheres are your responsibility. Also remember that this area is a very difficult one to conquer, so don't get down on yourself if you fail to climb Everest the first few, or dozen, or hundred times. Getting a warning beforehand helps, so you ...


10

I am a white male, and I had this happen to me recently, where I met a woman in a business setting who politely told me, "I don't shake hands for religious reasons". I had never heard this before, but it did not faze me in the least. She was polite in every other way that she treated me. No Problem!


8

The commandment to avoid negative reactions is on you, not your wife nor her friends. Of course they shouldn't be deliberately provocative, but if, for example, a normal conversation held in one part of your house bothers you in another part because of kol isha, or if the visitor is dressed appropriately and you are still distracted, this is largely a ...


7

Let me break this question down. First, there is a minhag (custom) that men should cover their head as a sign of reverence to G-d. The custom was codified as halacha for men (Orech Chaim 91:3) which stated that it is forbidden to say G-d's name or to even walk into a Synagogue with your head uncovered. For me the practical aspects are (a) that the kippah ...


7

When I got married I was told by my Rabbi who gave me a Choson Shmeus that it is the husbands responsibility. I have no idea what you are talking about when you say "The man often wants to know why, which they are usually reluctant to tell him". I never asked why on a Psak and if I did my Rav would not hesitate to explain. You say "The man often asks is ...


7

Rav Herschel Schachter told me that the reason they do it is because they are afraid that a hair will be left out of the mikveh when they do tevila. To avoid this problem they shave their heads. I have also heard that they suspect that there will be tangles, which are חציצה for the tevila, so they shave their heads. Neither of these reasons would really ...


7

Well, here's Rambam Laws of Husbandhood Ch. 14: יד,י [ח] האישה שמנעה בעלה מתשמיש המיטה--היא הנקראת מורדת, ושואלין אותה מפני מה מרדה: אם אמרה, מאסתיהו ואיני יכולה להיבעל לו מדעתי--כופין אותו להוציא לשעתו, לפי שאינה בשביה שתיבעל לשנוי לה; ותצא בלא כתובה כלל, ותיטול בליותיה הקיימין, בין מנכסים שהכניסה לבעלה ונתחייב באחריותן, בין מנכסים שלא נתחייב ...


7

Chacham Ovadia in Yechavei Daas 4:7 writes that seeing a woman on tv is the same as seeing an actual woman when it comes to hirur(thoughts) and there is an issur of lo tassuru achrei levavchem...however when it comes to reading shema that's a discussion which he talks about whether its mutar or not,but an issur of seeing a picture of a woman who is not ...


6

There are many interpretations. Here are a few. Rashi connects the previous verse of making "beautiful bedspreads for herself; fine linen and purple wool are her raiment" with the this verse: ניכר הוא בין חביריו מפני מלבושיו שהם נאים He is recognizable among his peers because of his garments, which are beautiful. The verse is not out of ...


6

There is much discussion in Jewish literature about this subject, and there is also a difference between a woman wearing a tallit and tefillin. It is easy to show what the Gemara and the Rema say, but leaving out all of the rishonim and acharonim on the topic would prevent learning where the halakha stands. But here is a start. Regarding tefillin Mishna ...


6

In Yalkut Yosef (Even HaEzer 21:9), Yitzhak Yosef writes in the name of his father, Hakham Ovadia Yosef (translation my own): פשט המנהג שבנות רווקות הולכות בגילוי ראש ברשות הרבים, שמעיקר ההלכה אשה שאינה נשואה אינה חייבת בכיסוי ראש. ורק בעת שמתפללות או מברכות ומזכירות שם שמים, תכסנה ראשן The general custom is for single women to go in public with ...


6

To paraphrase myself, If a person converts by any standard that is not universally recognized, then that person will not be regarded as Jewish by those with stricter standards. As you've observed, Orthodox Judaism is stricter than Conservative Judaism, and Orthodox conversion requires more than Conservative or Reform conversion. As such, Conservative ...


6

If a woman converted before she conceived any children are they considered Jewish? Even with a non-Jewish father? Yes. Children of a Jewish mother are Jewish, regardless. If mom converted she's Jewish. (A child who was in the mother's womb when mom converted is also Jewish, by the way.)


6

Rivivos Efraim 3:421 brings reasonings that woman should bow down on Yom Kippur and reasonings that woman should not bow down on Yom Kippur. He discusses whether woman bowed down in the temple and says that they did not as they were not there, however had a lady been in the courtyard of the temple and heard the Kohain Gadol say Hashem's name they would be ...


6

The Torah commands to attach tassels (or "fringes") to the edges of any four-cornered garments we must wear; however this only applies during the day, not night. This makes it a "yes-do" command that's limited in time. The rule of thumb for this category of commandments (which also includes shofar, lulav, and the like) is that women aren't obligated in them; ...


6

The Tzitz Eliezer has a famous responsum (שו"ת ציץ אליעזר ח"י סי’ כ"ה פרק כ"ו קטע ו) where he states that we go by the external organs in determining gender, and sex changes are effective in changing one's halachic gender. However, there are other opinions that sex changes do not change halachic gender; I assume that according to these opinions, gender is ...


6

See this similar answer from yoatzot.org. While certainly someone is looking for an experience to mark a change from the past, we generally frown upon having single women use the mikvah, though there are different customs about the day before Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur. So if your community lets women go to the mikvah then (many Lubavitch communities have ...


6

Rav Shmuel Kamenetsky in Kovetz Halchos pg 129 writes that a woman is obligated to drink a rivies of wine on Purim,and she can fulfill this obligation with grape juice(see footnote231). In footnote 230 he holds that since women are obligated in all the mitzvos if the day they are also obligated in drinking a little wine,but to drink alot of wine is an issur ...


5

The issue we have to ask is why is a psak (legal ruling) ever binding in the first place? Why can't you just ask the next person? There are two main possibilities (see Shach YD 242:31): שויה אנפשיה חתיכה דאיסורא The asker accepted upon themselves when they asked the first authority to follow their answer. Let's assume for now this principle works similar ...


5

As pointed out, the general policy is that unmarried women not go to mikvah because that could cause them to do things they shouldn't. There are different practices with regards to immersion pre high holidays; as Chanoch said, the Ben Ish Chai (a Baghdad rabbi about 200 years ago) said they should. If I recall correctly, there are different customs within ...


5

The remark of the Shulchan Aruch in Even HaEzer (21:2) is based on the Rambam (Hil. Issurei Bi'ah 21:17) and seems to be ultimately derived from the gemara in K'suvos (bottom of 72a). However, in light of the statement of the Shulchan Aruch elsewhere (OC 75:2, based on the mishna in K'suvos, 2:1) that it is customary for maidens to appear in public with ...


5

If you look into the morning brachos (prayes) it first says: 1) Thanks for not making me gentile. 2) Thanks for not making servant. 3) Thanks for not making me woman (for men). So it is progressive statement of what the person is not. That is because a Jewish man has much more obligations towards God than a Jewish woman. Both have much more obligations ...


5

As Clint already mentioned, the obligation to bring doves applies to a Zava - one who bleeds between the expected times of her period (to oversimplify). So most women never had this obligation. Another missing piece is that the woman does not have to bring the doves immediately - she can accumulate the obligations and bring them all together. As long as ...


4

Here's a start. The historian Norman Roth, in his Daily Life of the Jews in the Middle Ages, writes about the role of women in Spain (as well as Ashkenazic lands) at that time. On pg. 54, he writes: ...in all Muslim lands, and in Christian as well as Muslim Spain, women had equality with men in all business transactions. This meant that they could ...


4

Yerushalmi Challah 12b : Shmuel says that kol of a women is ervah because of the passuk in yirmiyahu 3:9. ט. וְהָיָה מִקֹּל זְנוּתָהּ וַתֶּחֱנַף אֶת הָאָרֶץ וַתִּנְאַף אֶת הָאֶבֶן וְאֶת הָעֵץ:‏ And it was through the voice [lit. lightness] of her harlotry, that she polluted the land, and she committed adultery with the stones and the wood.


4

Based on my observations (I am an anthropologist and fascinated by things like this) over the last 20 years, it is a recent custom for women to wear black, but it's spread very fast in the last decade. I can well remember my (and other people's) shock at attending a wedding in Jerusalem in the early 1990s at which the bride's female family members ...


4

http://judaism.stackexchange.com/a/1304/899 The difference between the two cases, of course, is that those other colors are a problem because they could have been dried blood, i.e. red at one time not currently red. According to Rav Elyashiv zt"l (cited inHalichos Bas Yisrael, Vol. 1 7:8 footnote 11) the prohibition is only with bright red. And it would ...



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