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21

From Rav Aviner's tshuvot (text) Wearing Wife's Jacket in the Cold Q: Is it permissible for a husband to wear his wife's jacket if he is cold, or is it forbidden on account of "Lo Yilbash" (the prohibition of cross-dressing)? And what about visa-versa? A: It is permissible, since the purpose is not to wear it but simply to warm up (Shut ...


11

Halachically, you transgress a biblical commandment if you knowingly have relations with a niddah, and the punishment is karet. See this answer, which cites Rambam Laws of Prohibitions on Relations 4:3. According to Rambam Issurei Biah 1:1 (h/t DoubleAA), punishments for forbidden relations apply to both except in a special case not applicable here. By ...


10

I have found that at Purim meals where no one gets seriously drunk, everyone tends to have an equivalently-good time. How good a time that is, of course, depends on the quality of the company, conversation, etc., just like at any other gathering. If you're looking for a great source of both holy and fun holiday-appropriate conversation-starters, I recommend ...


10

Her name was אמתלאי בת כרנבו. ואמר רב חנן בר רבא אמר רב אמיה דאברהם אמתלאי בת כרנבו אמיה דהמן אמתלאי בת עורבתי וסימניך טמא טמא טהור טהור Bava Basra 91a (I knew it existed, but will admit to having resorted to Google to find it fast.)


9

According to the GaRNa"T at the beginning of Maseches Kesubos, there is a school of Rishonim which holds that Nisuin is not a "transaction" (קנין) but is rather the initiation of their living together as husband and wife (תחילת הנהגת אישות). According to this school of thought, at least, one would not be able to send a shaliach, as Nisuin is not an "act of ...


8

"What is the best way to explain the concept of tzniut to a very young (say first grade) girl without explaining sexuality?" The same way you would explain the concept to anybody else: without explaining sexuality. To quote the esteemed R' Alex: This would have to begin with Micah 6:8: והצנע לכת עם א-להיך, "be tzanua in walking with your G-d" (this is ...


8

It is verses 10 - 31 of chapter 31 of Proverbs (Mishlei), commonly known as Eishes Chayil, or the woman of valor. It is customarily sung by men on Friday night before Kiddush. The topic of the song is the woman, but it may be an allegory, perhaps for Shabbos, perhaps for something else.


8

You've already cited the relevant source, but maybe it's worth seeing the Shulchan Arukh (YD 264:1) inside: הכל כשרים למול אפי' עבד אשה וקטן וערל ישראל שמתו אחיו מחמת מילה ואם יש ישראל גדול שיודע למול הוא קודם לכלם (וי"א דאשה לא תמול וכן נוהגין להדר אחר איש).‏ All can circumcise, even a slave or a woman or a child or an uncircumcised Jew. And if ...


7

The Aruch Hashulchan in siman 437 siff 7 writes that nowadays women are bodek even better than men and dig after a miniscule amount of chametz and wash and clean every place. Another point is to define what chazzal meant by women are atzlanios by citing one of the medrashim that uses the same terminology. See in Devarim Rabba Parsha 6 (#11) that prooves ...


7

This is pretty common in old* Siddurim. You can see omitting just ועל בריתך שחתמת בבשרינו on Hebrewbooks here here here here and here and on Hebrewmanuscripts.org manuscript #747. You can see omitting that phrase plus ועל תורתך שלימדתנו on Hebrewbooks here and on Hebrewmanuscripts.org manuscript #1762. This siddur is not clear how much exactly to omit. ...


7

R' C Cohen writes in Dose of Halacha .. There is another machlokes as to whether women are obligated at all. Ramban (Kiddushin 34a) holds that women are obligated, while Rambam (Temidin Umusafin 7:24; Sefer Hamitzvot 161) and the Magen Avraham (OC 489:1) hold that as it is a time-bound mitzva, women are exempt. The Mishna Berura (489:3) quotes the ...


7

I am impressed by the gravity of your inquiry and your care in the matter in that you are seeking real answers to a complicated question. May Hashem help the two of you and anyone else in need of this post. First let's address some issues your question raised in this case, and then let's address the Halachic ramifications. The OP states that your wife is ...


7

See this article for a more comprehensive discussion. Here are some sourced examples of women who donned tefillin: The gemara in Eruvin Daf 96 states that Queen Michal (wife of King David) wore tefillin. "[There] is the opinion [that women are obligated to wear tefillin] attributed to two prominent tannaim, R. Meir and R. Yehuda, as cited in multiple ...


7

According to this Rivevos Ephraim 5:491 it should not be a problem since the problem is making a man stumble and come to impure thoughts and its assur during kiras shema and these things are not applicable to a non Jew. See the tshuva inside. There are two Rabbanim who answered in the tshuvah.


6

Rabbi Abadi says it is permitted; here: Date: 9/23/2004 7:27:00 PM Message: Am I allowed to take a non-digital pregnancy test on shabbos? Reply: Yes CYA


6

Rambam Hilchos Ishus 15:19: וכן ציוו חכמים שיהיה אדם מכבד את אשתו יותר מגופו, ואוהבה כגופו; ואם יש לו ממון, מרבה בטובתה כפי הממון And similarly the Sages commanded that a person should honor his wife more than his own body, and love her like his own body. If he has money, he should increase her benefits according to his wealth.


6

The Zohar writes that the Patriarch Yitzchok had the soul of a female (Pikudei 257a). The Seder HaDoros (Elef HaRishon) says that it was the soul of Chava.


6

The Italian nusach Bnei Roma omits ועל בריתך שחסמת בבשרנו for women.


6

Judaism requires Jews to marry other Jews. But, like many laws, not everyone keeps this. A religiously-observant Jewish man is allowed to marry a non-religiously-observant Jewish woman, but they will have to have some serious conversations -- for instance, if she doesn't keep kosher but he does, will the kitchen be kosher? A non-observant Jewish man could ...


5

My mother likes going to a women's megillah reading, where women read for women. She says going, especially reading, gives her a feeling of being more involved on Purim.


5

First of all, as Double AA commented, לפניו is not exclusively male. In Hebrew, when referring to a group of males and females, the male form is used. That also applies when the reader is of unknown gender. The Chida (author of Birkei Yosef) wrote this several hundred years ago. In that time, it was not common for women or girls to come to shul at all. ...


5

The Kaf HaChaim writes in Yoreh Deah siman 116 number 149 "a woman that begins to nurse her son should begin nursing from the left breast first". He writes that his source is the Tzava'as Rebbe Yehudah HaChasid #69 and the sefer Shmiras HaNefesh #17. The sefer Mishnas Yehoshua footnote #18 (on the linked page) mentions that according to the sefer Shmiras ...


5

Although the real answer to your question would be found in the Double AA's answer, it's worth noting that there was at least one authority who did believe that pisuk raglayim was an issue for men as well, albeit not as big an issue as for women. The Chazon Ish felt that wearing a long jacket was proper for exactly this issue. In fact he would wear an extra ...


5

It seems to me that the answer to your question is that a man's spreading his legs is not as suggestive a position as the posture isn't reminiscent of intercourse (where a woman's spreading her legs is more...ergonomic). Indeed the phrase פישוק רגליים "spreading the legs" comes from Ezekiel 16:25 where the context and commentaries are clear that what is ...


5

The prohibition comes from Devarim 22:5, for which Rashi provides commentary as follows. Please click on the image to view "full screen" mode. Rashi is citing from the relevant section of the Babylonian Talmud (b. Nazir 8:1a, II.4.E [Folio 59A]), which appears as follows. Please click on the image to view "full screen" mode. The yellow highlighted area ...


5

In general, only one status is needed to be listed. For a Jewish born virgin, besulah is written because she is due 200 zuz upon divorce/death of husband. For a Jewish born "widow" (I'm not sure why you wrote "woman"), almanah is written because she is due 100 zuz upon termination of the marriage. For a Jewish born divorcee, gerushah is written because even ...


4

if by "Inyan of Upsherin" you mean hair cut then see @Danny Schoemann's answer but if by "Inyan of Upsherin" you mean the Inyan of chinuch from this answer the first haircut is about teaching the child about the Mitzvah of Pe'ot, since we cut the hair and leave the Pe'ot. Why do most people do it at 3, because age 3 is associated with starting to ...


4

A classic source for the Upsherin is the שערי תשובה in שו"ע או"ח סי' תקלא סק"ז He says: המנהג בארץ ישראל לעשות שמחה בתגלחת הראשונה של קטן, שמחנכין אותו במצוה להיות לו פאות הראש.‏ ‏ "The custom in the land of Israel is to make a joyous occasion out of the child's first haircut, when one inaugurates him into the concept of [not destroying] his ...


4

Reb Shlomo Zalman Orbach zt"l writes in Minchas Shlomo 103:15 that exposing the stockings is Pritzus and is considered Gilui, since clothing that is usually covered is akin to exposing the flesh. He bases this on the Bach and Shach in Yoreh Deia 340:22 on the Halacha of when a woman rips her clothing for kriah that she turns it around. They write that this ...



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