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12

Note 10 in Rav Eliezer Melamed's article on the "lighter fasts" states as follows: וכיום ההוראה הרווחת לנשים אשכנזיות שלא לצום. ועיין בפסקי תשובות תקנ, א, שהביא דעות מופלגות להיתר, שכל הנשים הראויות לילד פטורות מהצום, כדי שיהיה להן כוח לילד. ויש אמרו שתפדה את הצום בצדקה. ע"כ. ואין נוהגים להורות כמותם, אבל במקום ספק אפשר לצרף את דבריהם להיתר.‏ ...


12

I have seen Z"L used routinely for both men and women.


11

The woman can ask but the torah specifies that the man must write (order the writing of) the divorce document and deliver it to her. There are cases in which the court can order the man to write the get, but he must be the one to write it (or order it written) and it must be of his own free will. This is similar to the rules of getting married in which the ...


9

There are six commandments applicable to males at all times: Know there is God. Don't believe in other gods. Belief in unity of God. Love God. Fear God. Don't be misled by your eyes and heart. These are all equally relevant for females. The last one may apply somewhat differently to females and males. There are many other vitally important commandments ...


8

Tzitz Eliezer 14:73 spells this one out very explicitly: it's identical for sons and daughters -- the parents can't force them to marry or not-marry someone if they don't want to. (Though he adds that it's usually the right thing to do for both sons and daughters to ask their parents' advice or otherwise involve them somehow.) There is one responsum of ...


8

You ask what's appropriate. I don't see why z"l (or ז״ל) would be inappropriate. Nonetheless, I have often seen a"h (or ע״ה) for a woman where the same text included z"l (or ז״ל) for a man.


7

The answer is that the Mishna (Ketubbot 2:1) says that a Betula goes to the Chuppah with her hair uncovered. So what is there to talk about? Well, there's a responsum (#9) of Mahari HaLevi (the Taz's brother) where he rules that even an Arusa needs to cover her hair. This position seems difficult in light of the above Mishna (and indeed see Yechavveh Daat 5:...


7

According to this Rivevos Ephraim 5:491 it should not be a problem since the problem is making a man stumble and come to impure thoughts and its assur during kiras shema and these things are not applicable to a non Jew. See the tshuva inside. There are two Rabbanim who answered in the tshuvah.


7

Chiram, the craftsman who designed much of the first Beis Hamikdash, was the son of a widow (1 Melachim 7:14). The woman from Tzorfas who hosted Eliyahu was a widow with a son (1 Melachim 17:9-24), and there's a Midrash (don't remember the location) that he grew up to be the prophet Yona Also the "wife of one of the disciples of the prophets" (2 Melachim 4:1)...


7

This opinion is cited in the Taz YD 193 sk 4 and 196 sk 5. The idea is roughly that for hymenal bleeding, which only effects a Niddah Derabanan, there is no need to be stringent to add a 5th day. After any ordinary menstrual bleeding, this wouldn't apply. "Marriage" technically has nothing to do with it.


6

Saifer Hasidim 1120 brings that you can not say shehasimha bmoinoi if woman are sitting with men So it seems to me that halohacly it is not required, but it is preferable As @sam commented below this minhag (not to say shehasimha bmoinoi) is brought in the BaCh (on the tur) Sam's comment "http://beta.hebrewbooks.org/tursa.aspx?a=eh_x7291 see the ...


6

A Yo'etzet Halakhah is there to answer questions that are going unasked because some women are understandably embarrassed to raise them with a male rabbi. They can also find answers that wouldn't cross a man's mind simply because the territory is more familiar. The only halachic decisions they give are ones where the questioner's community has a well ...


6

It may be worth investigating Tzipora, the wife of Moshe Rabbeinu. She raised their sons without him between the time that he returned to Egypt at God's command and when Yitro brought her and the boys to join the Israelites in the desert (Exodus 18:1-4), which was either after the Exodus or after the Assembly at Sinai when the Torah was given. So, she ...


6

There are basically two lists of wives and each one contains 3 names. Traditional sources differ on exactly how to answer the contradiction, with the opinions ranging from Esau having 3,4,5, or 6 wives all together. See http://jbq.jewishbible.org/assets/Uploads/424/jbq_424_Kleinwivesofesau.pdf for an article which summarizes these views.


6

We see in Rashi to Parshas Lech Lecha (12:5) that Avraham and Sarah converted people (Avraham converted the men and Sarah the women) and that the Torah considers them as if they made them. I guess then that Sarah taught the women about Judaism.


6

Per this analysis: R. Moshe Feinstein responds to the maris ayin argument in multiple ways: 1. A woman covering her hair is an obligation, not a prohibition (it is an issur aseh) 2. Someone, even if not everyone, can almost always tell when a woman is wearing a wig 3. People in our community know that women often cover their hair with wigs His ...


5

In general, the state of being a menstruant does not place limitations on religious obligations. My understanding was in line with this statement: " When she is niddah a woman must continue to do all of her normal religious duties, like blessings and prayers. She should continue learning even with mentioning God's name when learning the verses of the Tanakh. ...


4

The Maharsham (vol. 3 ch. 206) writes: ובדין הכלה תוך ז״י המשחה ומלאכתה לחפור בגדים אם מותר לה לתפור בביתה הדבר פשוט לענ״ד שאם בעלה מסכים לזה אין חשש כלל דמצות התורה הוא על החתן שישמח אשתו וגם בזה יש דיעות דמהני מחילתה And regarding the case of a bride within the seven days of festivity, whose job is sewing clothing, addressing the issue of whether it ...


4

How about "For reasons of modesty I don't shake hands with the opposite gender- it's lovely to make your acquaintance / see you." It's the truth and it's to the point.


4

R. Nachum Rabinovitch (Siach Nachum, no. 40) addresses this question. Assuming that the congregation and the rabbi do not object, he says there is no halakhic problem with this, as long as the sefer Torah is treated with the respect due to it (from both men and women). However, it is also forbidden to cause machloket, such that if this will do so it would be ...


4

Pesach Hadvir 268:7 - line 10 says that since Vayechulu is a Eidus that is well known, even ladies can be witnesses for this. On line 15 he says that a man and lady can say it together. Kaf Hachaim 268:36 mentions this source.


4

Tosfos (Yevamos 45b D'h Mi Lo) gives two answers: "דבורה לא היתה דנה אלא מלמדת להן שידונו אי נמי על פי הדיבור שאני " Devorah didn't judge but taught others to judge Devorah was told to do so by Hashem Tosfos (Shevuos 29b) says " והיא שפטה את ישראל איכא למימר שהיתה מלמדת להם הדינים א"נ לפי שהיתה נביאה היו מקבלים אותה עליהם" She taught the judges how to ...


4

Your question uses some ambiguous language. You asked "Why can't a woman decide by herself to divorce?" The answer to your question depends on what you mean by "can't." On a simple level, the Torah lays out the procedure for divorce. Part of that procedure is the husband writing a bill of divorce (called a get) and giving it to the wife. When we understand ...


4

The Ben Ish Chai explains his own position in Year 2 Parashat Bereishit #18 קידוש הלילה אינו תלוי בתפלת ערבית, שאם ירצה לקבל שבת מבעוד יום ולקדש ולאכול ולהתפלל ערבית בלילה, רשאי, ורק צריך שיתחיל לאכול חצי שעה קודם זמן קריאת-שמע; אבל קידוש היום תלוי בתפלה, דכל זמן שלא התפלל שחרית, לא חל עליו חובת קידוש; ולכן, ביום שבת בבוקר יוכל לשתות מים קודם תפלה, מפני ...


4

The standard arrangements found in those codes assumed the standard cases back then, in which the husband was the primary (and usually) sole breadwinner. Any rights he had to her property -- and those were limited in ways your question is glossing over -- were only because first and foremost he supported her. The Talmud makes it abundantly clear that if she ...


4

Leviticus 19:3: איש אמו ואביו תיראו, ואת-שבתתי תשמרו: אני, יהוה אלהיכם. Every man must revere his mother and father, and keep My Sabbaths. I am Hashem your Lord. The Talmud in Kidushin 30b - 31a explains this precedence: תניא רבי אומר גלוי וידוע לפני מי שאמר והיה העולם שבן מכבד את אמו יותר מאביו מפני שמשדלתו בדברים לפיכך הקדים הקב"ה כיבוד ...


4

If you search Google for "Mrs. * ZT-L", you'll find many instances of this honorific used for couples, and a few for women. Here are some examples of it used for women by various Jewish news or public relations outlets: BaltimoreJewishLife.com regrets to inform the community of the petirah of Mrs. Chaya Bobrowsky, zt’l, grandmother of Reb Yoni Adler. -...


4

This is a big Machloket Rishonim. The Rambam (Tzitzit 3:9), among others, rules that women may not say blessings on Mitzvot they are not obligated in, while Rabbeinu Tam and the Rashba (RH 33a), among others, rule they may. In OC 589:6, the Shulchan Arukh rules like the former group while the Rama notes the custom is like the latter group (though in his ...


4

It's one of the ten curses Eve got cursed from God listed in Eiruvin (100,b) she should grow hair as Lilith.


3

I'll preface this ridiculously long answer by echoing the OP of answering with disinterest. The Gemara only ever uses the term guf naki when discussing someone putting on tefillin. There are two main ways that the Talmudic sages and broader rabbinic literature have understood the term "a clean body": As a Spiritual Condition For the Meiri (Beit ...



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