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6

Per this analysis: R. Moshe Feinstein responds to the maris ayin argument in multiple ways: 1. A woman covering her hair is an obligation, not a prohibition (it is an issur aseh) 2. Someone, even if not everyone, can almost always tell when a woman is wearing a wig 3. People in our community know that women often cover their hair with wigs His ...


4

It's one of the ten curses Eve got cursed from God listed in Eiruvin (100,b) she should grow hair as Lilith.


4

This is a big Machloket Rishonim. The Rambam (Tzitzit 3:9), among others, rules that women may not say blessings on Mitzvot they are not obligated in, while Rabbeinu Tam and the Rashba (RH 33a), among others, rule they may. In OC 589:6, the Shulchan Arukh rules like the former group while the Rama notes the custom is like the latter group (though in his ...


4

How about "For reasons of modesty I don't shake hands with the opposite gender- it's lovely to make your acquaintance / see you." It's the truth and it's to the point.


3

See Ramma in Even HaEzer 154 Siff 1 . He discusses a man who is Ro'eh Zonos, which may mean he visits prostitutes or just has random affairs, and his wife complains about it. He says witnesses of him cavorting like this (not just young nonjews stating this) is grounds for forcing (either literally or through religious convincing, see Siff 21) him to give a ...


3

The Comprehensive English-Yiddish Dictionary has Hasid, f. --- די חסידה, ־ות; די חסידתטע, ־ס with pronunciations [KhSÍDE, -S] and [KhSÍDESTE, -S], respectively.


3

The short answer(s): (a) Rashi, Tosafot, the Ran, the Rosh, the Tur (according to the Rema in Darkei Moshe EH 115 #4) and the Shulchan Aruch (EH 21:2, 115:4) all understand the Mishna/Gemara on Ketubot 72a to mean that a woman has no obligation (a priori) to cover her hair in her courtyard, and certainly not at home, even though it may be praiseworthy to do ...


2

Mitzvas Habayis - page 305 starts off that respecting your wife is talking about clothing and jewelry where one is supposed to do more for his wife than for himself. He goes on to say this includes food also.


2

Rabbi Mendel Kaplan zt'l is quoted as saying: "To a woman, says the Rambam, her life has as much value as she feels she's worth to her husband. When her husband honors her, he shows that she is valuable to him. A wife is not a chavrusa, G-d forbid. It can cause a lot of trouble if you think in those terms - that sometimes you're right and ...


2

Based on clarification of OP's question found in comments: The source for this quote is the Gemara Bava Metsia 59a: לעולם יהא אדם זהיר בכבוד אשתו, שאין ברכה מצויה בתוך ביתו של אדם אלא בשביל אשתו, שנאמר ולאברם הטיב בעבורה. והיינו דאמר להו רבא לבני מחוזא: אוקירו לנשייכו כי היכי דתתעתרו A person should always be careful regarding the honor of his wife, ...


1

While I cannot speak to the sources (I am not the author, who oddly enough includes sources elsewhere), many of the cases in which a woman forfeits her right to the kesubah are delineated by Chazal. If the wife commits adultery, spitefully withholds relations, or makes her husband commit aveiros (such as feeding him non-kosher or having him bo'el niddah by ...


1

Chossidit is an adjective, not a name. But Chassidist is a name. In Hebrew this name is Chassida. In Erets Israel we say Chassida. But Litayt, not Litaa. (mnemonic: Storks eat lizards, so we say litait because of the Chassida).


1

The obligation for women to drink 4 cups like men from the Gemoro in Pesochim 108b. ת"ר: הכל חייבין בארבעה כוסות הללו, אחד אנשים ואחד נשים Reasons given are that although women are exempt from time-bound mitzvos, here women were also involved in the miracles. Further it was in their merit that we were redeemed and they also suffered the enslavement ...


1

I found this: משנה. מי שהיה עבד או אשה או קטן מקרין אותו – עונה אחריהן מה שהן אומרין, ותבא לו מאירה. אם היה גדול מקרא אותו – עונה אחריו הללויה, מקום שנהגו לכפול – יכפול, לפשוט – יפשוט, לברך – יברך, הכל כמנהג המדינה. One who has a slave, a woman, or a minor read [the Hallel] to him, he must repeat after them what they say, and a curse be ...


1

"Although it is clear enough that Jewish men should not touch women for reasons of niddah" This is not entirely exact. For the husband this is the reason, and nidda as a prohibition punished by Karet, not as a uncleanness. But a married wife married with an other man, despite that she is not nidda is prohibited because Eshet Ish. See Sefer Hachinuch ...



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