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7

The Aruch Hashulchan in siman 437 siff 7 writes that nowadays women are bodek even better than men and dig after a miniscule amount of chametz and wash and clean every place. Another point is to define what chazzal meant by women are atzlanios by citing one of the medrashim that uses the same terminology. See in Devarim Rabba Parsha 6 (#11) that prooves ...


7

"What is the best way to explain the concept of tzniut to a very young (say first grade) girl without explaining sexuality?" The same way you would explain the concept to anybody else: without explaining sexuality. To quote the esteemed R' Alex: This would have to begin with Micah 6:8: והצנע לכת עם א-להיך, "be tzanua in walking with your G-d" (this is ...


6

I have found that at Purim meals where no one gets seriously drunk, everyone tends to have an equivalently-good time. How good a time that is, of course, depends on the quality of the company, conversation, etc., just like at any other gathering. If you're looking for a great source of both holy and fun holiday-appropriate conversation-starters, I recommend ...


4

The official position of the Conservative movement can be found in Women and the Minyan by Rabbi David J. Fine. It was released in 2002 as an explanation of the 1983 decision by the Jewish Theological Seminary to ordain women as rabbis and cantors. The main question that caused debate in the period of 1973-1983 was whether a woman could be a sheliach ...


4

in sefer hayashar parshas vayeishev page kuf ayin beis (172) "(transltated from the hebrew) ...and to yovav ben yokton two daughters the older one was adinah and the younger was aridah and levi took adinah and yissachar took aridah" so the answer to your question is acording to sefer hayashar the name of levis wife is adinah


4

My mother likes going to a women's megillah reading, where women read for women. She says going, especially reading, gives her a feeling of being more involved on Purim.


4

The idea that you are referring to is called "Chomer" and "Tzurah" and is a recurring theme in the philosophy of the Maharal that extends beyond the mashal of man/woman. The Maharal (Gur Aryeh, Devarim: 25:18) relates that all of creation is built in two complementary systems - Tzurah and Chomer. Tzurah is the influential force, providing a general ...


3

The ר״ן in פסחים on 30b says that we only say that women are lazy if there is no definite איסור, but if there is definitely an איסור (for instance, the removal of גיד הנשה) they are believed.


3

In parshas Vayeishev the Seffer Hayashar says her name was Adina.


2

Excerpts from this blog entry: The gemara (Sanhedrin 42a) describing kiddush levana, states regarding women: אמר ליה רב אחא לרב אשי: במערבא מברכי ברוך מחדש חדשים, אמר ליה: האי - נשי דידן נמי מברכי The basic implication of the gemara seems to be that although women recite a shorter beracha, they do say something. Similarly, the Meiri ...


2

The Talmud (Brachot 24a) mentions the calf (ie. the body segment of the leg with two bones) as a place on a women's body which was normally covered. Many Rishonim1 explain that this is mentioned to teach that the status of a covered body part for women is independent of its also being a covered body part for men (which, apparently, the calf wasn't at the ...


2

This is an answer based on my own interpretation of Aishes Chayil, so take it for what it's worth. I am a woman. I have always felt that Aishes Chayil was deliberately written with women as the intended audience. (Not saying it was or it wasn't actually written for women, just that it reads that way in a certain sense.) What I mean is that it focuses on ...


1

Not voicing an opinion, just providing sources that it's impractical to allow women to dance with the Sefer Torah. See the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch סימן קנג - הלכות נדה that says: סעיף טז' אִשָּׁה נִדָּה, בִּימֵי רְאִיָתָהּ קֹדֶם יְמֵי לִבּוּנָהּ, נוֹהֲגִין שֶׁאֵינָהּ נִכְנֶסֶת לְבֵית הַכְּנֶסֶת וְאֵינָהּ מִתְפַּלֶּלֶת. אַךְ בַּיָמִים הַנּוֹרָאִים, ...


1

Kol Isha -- presumably, the gemara in Megilla says that theoretically a woman could receive an aliyah. In those times, receiving an aliyah meant reading the Torah as well. Hence many rabbis (including some Orthodox ones) would say that kol isha wouldn't be a problem reading the Torah, and if that kind of singing isn't provocative, one could argue that ...


1

The same reason why there are no female masseurs - they're called masseuses! Rabbi (1) (feminine: Rebbetzin) A Torah scholar, teacher or authority. Rabbi (2) (feminine: Rabbi) A scholar or teacher hired to lead a Jewish congregation. In other words, the reason there are not female Orthodox rabbis is the same reason there are no gentile Orthodox ...



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