Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I haven't been able to locate any direct resource that addresses this problem, that, hopefully, does not occur too frequently. But, here are some concerns that I think would cause problems if you waited too long. One of the biggest concerns is regarding a wedding that occurs close to twilight. This was a concern at my wedding and the mesader kiddushin (who, ...


0

It is a reference to Torah learning (sometimes written out as נירו יאיר באורה, זו תורה - May his candle (i.e. soul נר ה' נשמת אדם) shine with light, this is Torah), which is obligatory only on men, so women are not generally given that honorific. It is an honorific used while the person is alive. It seems to go back to at least the 1700's in some form or ...


2

נ"י Which is an abbreviation of נרו יאיר, literally meaning something like "His candle will shine". According to the Gemara (Shabes page 30) the Neshama of a Jew is called a candle-נר, and thus the phrase is a blessing for a person that he will influence good in the world. In the holy Zohar, an interesting definition of the Neshama states that the ...


1

"Nero Yair" -- may his lamp illuminate. Traditionally used after the name of a boy or young man, as a wish that he achieve spiritual growth. Afraid I don't know the earliest historical use. Usually seen in wedding invitations after the groom's name, assuming he's relatively young. Traditional wedding invitations would use תחי׳, short for תחיה -- "may she ...


1

It means נרו יאיר. Their light should be bright. This is commonly found in the works of the Rishonim when referencing another authority or teacher.



Top 50 recent answers are included