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5

Other items to add that MAY occur: Some have a custom that if the bride and / or groom is / are the last child being married, they will do a "mezinkeh" ceremony. Customs on this vary, somewhat. Usually, the mother of the child wears a wreath on her head, and people dance with the parents and bride / groom to a special tune. Often, one of the dancers brings ...


11

To supplement, not supplant, Daniel's good answer: Orthodox Jewish weddings start late. (Even later, often, if the bride and groom are Sephardic.) This varies geographically; for example, in my experience, ceremonies start almost on time in St. Louis, Missouri, but as much as an hour later than scheduled in New York City and environs. It may also vary by ...


21

Yes, there is plenty that is worth knowing ahead of time about Orthodox weddings. First, I'll talk a little about what will or might be expected from you at the wedding and then I'll talk a little about what to expect at a Jewish wedding and how it's different from a non-Jewish or non-Orthodox wedding (I'm assuming since you say you've never been to a Jewish ...


2

A twist on this is Rabbi Rackman's proposal, there is an implicit condition "I'm only marrying you if you're the type of person who wouldn't leave me an agunah." Rabbi Yitzchok Breitowitz refers to this as the "bad seed argument." The problem is that people can change. Sadly, maybe at the moment of the wedding he was not the sort of person who could do ...



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