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2

I think the answer is written in an actual verse: Psalms 137, 5-6 אם-אשכחך ירושלים-- תשכח ימיני. תדבק-לשוני, לחיכי-- אם-לא אזכרכי: אם-לא אעלה, את-ירושלים-- על, ראש שמחתי 137:5 If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning. 137:6 Let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth, if I remember thee not; if I set not Jerusalem ...


1

I think that you've answered your own question based on your parenthetical remarks. Combining mourning and joy at the same event or day is quite common, actually. In Israel, for example, almost immediately following the joyous Simchat Torah dancing, they recite Yizkor. At one wedding that I attended, they said "Kel Maleh Rachamim" for terrorist victims in ...


1

It seems to be coused by the Rebbe's sicha which sais to put this time (and to copy the Rebbe's if there minhagim became public, but specifically by weddings, by a marriage ain sof power is needed the leader of the generation brings it to us so we should act like him) י. האמור לעיל הוא בנוגע למנהגים בכלל. ובפרט בנוגע למנהגי חתונה – ה"ז בודאי נוגע לכל, ...


5

Other items to add that MAY occur: Some have a custom that if the bride and / or groom is / are the last child being married, they will do a "mezinkeh" ceremony. Customs on this vary, somewhat. Usually, the mother of the child wears a wreath on her head, and people dance with the parents and bride / groom to a special tune. Often, one of the dancers brings ...


11

To supplement, not supplant, Daniel's good answer: Orthodox Jewish weddings start late. (Even later, often, if the bride and groom are Sephardic.) This varies geographically; for example, in my experience, ceremonies start almost on time in St. Louis, Missouri, but as much as an hour later than scheduled in New York City and environs. It may also vary by ...


21

Yes, there is plenty that is worth knowing ahead of time about Orthodox weddings. First, I'll talk a little about what will or might be expected from you at the wedding and then I'll talk a little about what to expect at a Jewish wedding and how it's different from a non-Jewish or non-Orthodox wedding (I'm assuming since you say you've never been to a Jewish ...



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