Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Per the OU Daf HaKashrus Volume 15 No 6 dated March 2008 this question was answered by Rabbi Gersten as follows "In a near sea level environment water boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit. at higher elevations water boils at lower temperatures. In Denver for example the average boiling temperature is 202 degrees Fahrenheit. when Hagalah is performed in high ...


13

Rabbi Moshe Tendler says that the principle of "as it absorbs, so it exudes" (k'bol'o kach polto) means METHOD of absorption, not temperature. Fire kashering for things that became unkosher through dry heat (roasting, grilling) and boiling for liquids. His example was that a spoon that became unkosher on a camping trip to the Dead Sea through immersion in ...


11

In a book I own called שער העין - Shaar HaAyin by a Rabbi Eliyahu Ariel in Chapter 7 Footnote 14 he says that this does not qualify for the special blessing on a rainbow as that was only for rainbows in clouds which are similar to the one by Noah. However, he suggests that it qualifies as an amazing natural wonder (similar to lightning) and would therefore ...


10

Quick Google brings http://twitter.com/kinbot The Kinneret Bot! Also see: http://savethekinneret.com/ (chart is a bit messy, though) http://www.israelweather.co.il/kineret.asp (in hebrew)


10

Please see "The Segal Guide to Fasting For Yom Kippur (from a Medical Perspective)," written by a physician. The very first point he deals with is the thirst issue you raised. Hope you have a successful and meaningful fast this year!


9

Hacham Ovadia Yosef discusses this issue in Yabia Omer Helek 7 Siman 44 in terms of the kinneret, which supplies water for most of israel. Kibbutzim along the coast are KNOWN for dumping hametz into the water. He answers that hametz dumped before pesach is nullified in 60. During pesach, he applies the concept of "tzonen bitzonen". Since the hametz and water ...


9

The reason not to water an animal is that it was banned by rabbis because it takes too much time and effort (tircha) (e.g., Aruch Hashulchan 324:1). They built exceptions into the ban in cases of need (such as, usually, when the animal depends on you for food) (e.g., 324 passim). The reason not to water a plant is because God said you can't make a plant grow ...


9

R. Yitzchak Abadi has told me that it's no problem, at any point in the prayers. There is also no need to make a shehakol if one is drinking the water for the sole purpose of lubricating one's throat. Shehakol is only recited on water when the drinking serves the purpose of quenching one's thirst (see Shulchan Aruch OC 204:7).


8

True, but it's not visible beforehand like water. If dew weren't listed separately, we might think that it doesn't count, because it just condensed from the air rather than actually "falling" on the food. Besides, even water (or the other liquids) don't always make the food they touch muchshar (susceptible to tum'ah). Much of Maseches Machshirin discusses ...


8

From a personal perspective, I have found that the easiest fasts I have had, came when Yom Kippur was on a Monday, and Sunday morning I did a 3-4 hour run (training for a fall marathon). My theory is that knowing how dumb an idea it is to do a 3-4 hour run, mere hours before a 25 hour fast, I try to compensate by drinking the rest of the day, every 10-20 ...


7

There is a story of a great Rav (no official source) who would shower after the mikvah. When asked about his custom he answered: Before going into the mikvah I shower because of the mitzvah "ואהבת לרעך". When coming out I shower because of "כמוך".


7

The source for this is Shabbos 14a and Yorah Deah 201:75 Rama. http://www.dailyhalacha.com/displayRead.asp?readID=1814 As in many Halachos there is a Machlokes. In summary according to the custom of the Ashkenazim, a woman should not bathe or shower after immersing in the Mikveh. Sepharadim, however, do not follow this custom, and thus ...


7

What you are talking about is combining grama (indirect effect, which is NOT pemritted by most, even for rabbinic prohibitions, with certain exceptions) and safek (uncertain result, i.e., we don't know if your water use will trigger the resupply loop). Safek is generally permitted for rabbinic or grama situations, so long as there is a reasonable potential ...


7

The following explanation is in a footnote at torah.org 22 For unknown reasons, Tosfos, Moed Katan 11a (quoted by Reb Akiva Eiger Y.D. 116 and by Kaf ha-Chayim 170:79), advises against drinking water [or soda] after fish. She'arim Metzuyanim B'halachah 33:2 (2) suggests that for this reason whiskey - and not water - is customarily drunk between ...


7

The Talmud (Sotah 18a) records the following question: בעי רבא: השקה בסיב, מהו? בשפופרת, מהו? דרך שתיה בכך, או אין דרך שתיה בכך? תיקו.‏ Rava asked: If they had her drink [the waters] through a tube, what is the ruling? through a reed, what is the ruling? Is that the manner of drinking or it is not the manner of drinking? The matter remained ...


6

No. The Kaf HaHaim 181:10 rules that one isn't required to use a Keli that is proper for Netilat Yadayim (see Levush and Kol Bo Siman 23).


6

This answer is going to need some background knowledge of bittul (nullification). This will be very much oversimplified, but enough for our purposes, I think. Two Types of Bittul Min BeMino - a mixture of the same types of food. In this case the prohibited substance (the 'issur') is batel if it is in the minority (rov). The rabbis enacted a restriction ...


6

It's not a matter of a chatzitzah - anything liquid wouldn't be a chatzitzah, because the water will wash it away (Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 161:2). It's rather that the water from the first washing becomes tamei by touching your hands (which themselves are tamei - that's why you have to wash them), and the second washing then renders the hands, and the ...


6

There is such a minhag, but the language of the Rema in 291:2 is: Some say that it is forbidden to drink water between mincha and maariv on shabbos because that is when the souls return to purgatory (reasoning needed?). Therefore, one should not eat seudah shlishis between mincha and maariv, rather he should eat it before mincha. Yet ...


6

R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi writes (Orach Chaim 467:48): מי שרוצה לשאוב בפסח מבארות של נכרים או מבארות של ישראל שלא נזהר בהן מחמץ כל השנה, טוב שיסנן המים בבגד נקי בכל פעם ששואב. אבל מעיקר הדין אין מחזיקין איסור מספק. "One who wants to draw water on Pesach from wells owned by non-Jews, or by Jews but with which they weren't careful to ...


5

Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach ruled that while yes, we say "chametz is not nullified even 1/1000", but a few pieces of bread in the ocean are so far past the mark that they become nullified. So somewhere between one-in-a-thousand and one-in-a-quintillion (approximate volume of the Mediterranean in gallons).


5

There is water from rainfall and wells, and then there is water that has condensed from vapor in the air. The former is one kind of water, and the latter is a different kind, halachically speaking. The fact that they are chemically identical doesn't make them halachically identical. For example, if one were to synthesize grape juice using chemicals and ...


5

Shulchan Aruch HaRav 336:9 (My translation) - ‏ולפיכך מי שאוכל בגינה צריך ליזהר שלא ליטול ידיו על העשבים מפני שמשקה אותם...אבל מותר להטיל עליהם מי רגלים או יין ושאר משקים מפני שהם שורפים אותם ואין מצמיחים אותם אלא מים בלבד וראוי ליזהר אף במשקין Therefore one who eats in a garden must be careful not to wash his hands on the grass since he is ...


4

Perhaps Miriam is alluded to in the verse יִחַד לֵב וְגָל אֶבֶן מִפִּי בְאֵר מַיִם and also in the verse קוֹרֵא וּמַזֶּה טָהֳרַת *מַיִם ר*וּחַק מֵעַם פַּחַז כַּמָּיִם Another thought: When Miriam was Nifteres it says that the water continued in the Zechus of Moshe who was still living. ...


4

Indeed (as in your comment), in 160:5 it says that melachah disqualifies water only if it was drawn, "but not with water from a mikvah or a spring while they are still attached [to their source]." I'm not entirely familiar with how hydroelectric plants work, but doesn't the water continue flowing nonstop as it's turning the turbines or whatever? So that ...


4

In Shabbos 129a and 140b, the Gemara points out that "bal tashchis" of one's own body outweighs other kinds. So for your first question, if indeed letting the water run gives you purer water (which is better for you), then indeed this should apply. If it's just to get colder water (which presumably does the same thing for your body as if it were lukewarm), I ...


4

Basically yes, though milk&meat may be the exception. I heard Rabbi Hershel Schachter call this a question of efshar lehasiro, quoting Rabbi Soloveichik. IIRC the Gemara discusses roasting some meat where the fat and blood drip to the bottom; then if you know just the right amound of salt to add, you can pull out one and leave the other. (Something to ...


4

The only natural fresh water source around Jerusalem is the Gihon spring located just to the east of the city. Originally, there was an aqueduct that brought water into the city, but it was at ground level and could relatively easily be attacked by opposing armies, as the spring was located outside the city walls due to engineering concerns. King Hezekiah in ...


4

From HalachaForToday.com 1) Mayim Achronim does not require a utensil, nor does it require "Koach Gavra, force of a human" like the washing of Netilas Yadayim. The source is from the Mishna Berurah, 181:21 As far as whether to wash into a keili or not, the same site says this: Rather, the water should be washed into a utensil that is designated ...


4

The Beer Mayim Chaim Answers: If you take the word סלע and write it with all it letters spelled out (this is a Kabbalistic system) out you get. ס*מ*ך ל*מ*ד ע*י*ן Now ,we can understand why it says וְדִבַּרְתֶּם אֶל הַסֶּלַע לְעֵינֵיהֶם וְנָתַן מֵימָיו Because in middle of the word סלע you have the word מים. This also explains why he had to hit it twice ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible