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9

Learn the meaning behind the vidui before saying it. Buy a sefer that translates them or an interlinear siddur, and daven from that. Write your own commentary to them whilst learning the meanings.


8

Mishna Berura 573:8 mentions that a Chasan should say Viduy on the day of the wedding. There is no mention that it has to be at Mincha. Most likely the Minhag of saying it at Mincha was done practically as most weddings are after the time of Mincha. However it can be done anytime in the day. http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/475826/jewish/Day-of-...


7

The Encyclopedia of Jewish Prayer: The Ashkenazic and Sephardic Rites (Macy Nulman) has the following on the beating of the heart during Viduy When saying Ashamnu we stand somewhat bent over, without leaning on any kind of support, just as in reciting Modim (MB, 607:10 ; Magen Avraham 607:4), a position of abject humility and contrition. One should ...


5

The phrase, "חפש כל חדרי בטן" comes from Proverbs 20:27: נר ה' נשמת אדם חפש כל חדרי בטן "The spirit of man is the lamp of the LORD, searching all the inward parts." (JPS 1917) The word, בטן, is often used simply to mean "belly" (and is therefore associated with pregnancy), but in this context it means the innermost aspects of the human being. Thus,...


5

The Chabad custom is to strike one's chest when saying the word "חיבים" in the last section of the Al Chet. It is mentioned in Sefer HaSichos of the Friediker Rebbe 5705 page 9 (my own translation): The Chosid R' Aba Person once asked the Rebbe Maharash how many times one strikes his chest on Yom Kippur. From the number he answered, R' Aba Person ...


4

"מחזור המפורש" (Gefen, Jerusalem 5772 Ashkenaz) explains (a few times, but see page לה) that this confession means that we have lead others astray. תעינו מן הדרך הישרה, והתינו אחרים ממנה. ‏ In a footnote there (טו), they cite another explanation: עשינו מעשי תעתועים ומרמה. ‏ Both of these explanations are confessions, and not accusations.


4

This is impossible to answer since we do not know where you daven or what kind of speed they daven at. My experience has been that in shuls that are "frummer" i.e. higher percentages of people who are serious about Torah and mitzvos, people take longer to daven, especially on Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. Where I daven the silent prayer on Rosh Hashana can ...


4

As is fitting for a confession of sins, the punishments are listed according to the severity of the sins for which they are imposed, not the severity of the punishments themselves. "Rabbinic lashes" are imposed for violations of Rabbinic law or the failure to fulfill a positive Biblical commandment. (In any event, I don't believe it is accurate to say that ...


3

As shared with us earlier today by Rabbi Joseph B. Meszler:


3

According to Wikipedia, The last two sins (repetitions of the letter תּ) are "תָּעִינוּ תִּעְתָּעְנוּ" (taw'inu, titawnu) are usually translated as: "We went astray, We led others astray". Occasionally the last word is translated as "You (= the Deity) allowed us to go astray"—the widely used ArtScroll Siddur uses both possibilities,[3] the point ...


2

Praying does not require speed - it requires Kavana - focus, concentration and meaning. I'm not sure why you should feel embarrassed in any way. Contrarily, if the majority finishes a long time before you, it could mean that they were speeding and had no or minimal kavanah. Besides, on Yom Kippur, you have an entire day to be in shul. Where are you and ...


2

This is really a question on a specific translation/interpretation of the word. The OU published an explanatory translation of Viduy. On this translation they comment: You have let us go astray (we lost the merit to benefit from Your help); This reminds me of the statement in the Talmud (several places, including Yoma 38b): בא לטמא פותחין לו One ...


2

Rambam lists confession as an aspect of t'shuva (Yad, T'shuva chapter 2) and possibly of independent value (chapter 1). He notes that t'shuva is insufficient for interpersonal sins and one must appease the wronged person (end of chapter 2) — but that doesn't mean it's unnecessary! (Note also that Rambam's wording "neither t'shuva nor Yom Kipur atone, ...


1

The "Viduy-Hamashlim" was writen by my. Binyamin holtzman, Rav Kibutz Ma'ale gilbo'a. את "הוידוי המשלים" אני כתבתי. בנימין הולצמן, רב קיבוץ מעלה גלבוע look for בנימין הולצמן at facebook


1

The Mechaber says (507:3) that one should stand for Vidui, and the Rama there adds that the main part of Vidui is the phrase "אבל אנחנו חטאנו" "...but we have sinned". So it seems that this is the minimal requirement for bending. See Mishnah Brurah commentary 12 that states that even though you should say all the paragraphs standing, it is suggested to bend ...


1

On Yom Kippur itself it is said 8 times: [in parentheses I have placed the page numbers from the Artscroll Machzor Zichron Yosef] In the amida for ma'ariv (94) Slichot after the amida in ma'ariv (132) Silent shacharit amida (360) Chazarat hashatz for shacharit (422) Silent musaf amida (496) Chazarat hashatz for musaf (600) Silent mincha amida (660) ...



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