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6

The manure is completely broken down and absorbed by the soil. An analogy can be made using the difference between honey and milk. Manure is actually that which is rejected by the non-kosher animal. It is not created in the animal's body. As a result, it is considered as external chemical that have been separated from the food that the animal ate, broken ...


5

The source for this is a Gemara in Berachos, 39a: אמר רב פפא פשיטא לי מיא דסלקא כסלקא ומיא דלפתא כלפתא ומיא דכולהו שלקי ככולהו שלקי Rav Pappa said "It is evident that beet-liquid is like a beet, radish liquid is like a radish, and liquid of all boiled (produce) is like the produce" There are several interpretations of the Rishonim as to the reason ...


1

There is a trick that you can do on Yom Tov whereby you can take a broken piece of matzah, and burn the broken edge, rendering the piece whole for the purpose of lechem mishna. Since the fry is surrounded on all sides by crust, I would say that it would be whole just like the formerly broken matzah.


2

The reason "Daver Shalem" gets priority can be for one of two reasons 1) The food item was created that way ("ברייה") an example could be a apple or even a grape. 2) That by taking the "Daver Shalem" before the other item you are beautifying the mitzvah of making a bracha (Hidur Mitzvah) Thus if you had a large slice of bread and a small roll you would ...


4

What you describe is documented in the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן נג - דין רטב ומשקה של פרות וירקות: סעיף ב': פֵּרוֹת שֶׁאֵין דַּרְכָּן לְבִשּׁוּל אֶלָּא לְאָכְלָן חַיִּין, אִם בִּשְּׁלָן, מְבָרֵךְ עַל הָרֹטֶב שֶׁהַכֹּל. אֲבָל פֵּרוֹת שֶׁדַּרְכָּן לְיַבְּשָׁן וּלְבַשְּׁלָן וְהֵן שְׁכִיחִים לָרֹב וְנָטְעֵי לְהוּ אַדַּעְתָּא דְּהָכִי, אִם בִּשְּׁלָן ...


0

Shulchan Aruch 202:16 reads: On dried pepper and ginger… and anything that, like them, is not eaten except in a mixture, one says no b'racha at all. However, this seems not to be quite as broad in practice as it sounds. Mishna B'rura :79, for example, notes that the no-b'racha on dried pepper and ginger is because "there's no pleasure from them ...


1

The Bach in O.C. Siman 167 has a nice explanation of this. He starts by pointing out that the word "hamotzi" is the preferred word for the blessing, even though the word "motzi" would suffice, because "hamotzi" implies both past and future tense (Berachos 38a). The intent, he says, is both on this bread which came out of the ground, and on the bread that ...



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