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8

This is not a practice unique to Chabad, and did not even originate with Chabad. The Nitei Gavriel (Pesach vol 2, chapter 39, paragraph 14) mentions this custom, saying that "Many are stringent on Pesach to only eat peeled vegetables". In the footnote he references the Chayei Adam 127:2 (not a Chabad source) and Orchot Chayim Lifshitz (notes to Orach ...


7

The Talmud (Shabbat 91a) discusses the minimum measurement of food that must be carried between domains on Shabbat in order to be obligated in punishment. The minimum shiur depends on what the intended use of the object is. A kegrogeret (the size of a dried fig, which is greater than or equal to a kezayit) is the minimum amount of food when the food is ...


6

A straightforward answer is provided by the Meiri (Beis HaB'chira, B'rachos 35a) and echoed by the Shita M'kubeztes (Brachos 35a), who write that the phrasing for each is based on verses pertaining to each (as mentioned in Michoel's answer and in Shalom's answer). Further, the Meiri indicates that borei p'ri ha'adama would also be suitable for bread, ...


6

The Shita Mekubetzes to Brochos 35a ask this, and explains that the choice of wording for the two blessings is in accordance with phrases found previously in Tanach - the blessing for bread is based on the verse (Tehillim 104:14) "להוציא לחם מן הארץ", whereas the blessing for vegetables comes from the verse (Devarim 26:2) "מראשית כל פרי האדמה".


5

If your potato skins being plain means that they are not cooked, then they are shehakol - Berachos 38b - anything which is normally eaten cooked, if eaten raw is shehakol. Potatoes are normally eaten cooked. If they are cooked, then they would be ha'adama, as potato skins are normal to eat along with the potatoes (as opposed to many fruit peels which are ...


5

According to the CRC-Chicago iceberg lettuce that is prewashed may be used without hashgacha and without any further washing.


4

People I know asked Reb Moshe Feinstein about instant potatoes and he said Ha'adama. His reasoning was that it still lookes like potatoes. Most chassidishe hechsheirim, who print their opinions on the packaging, say to make a shehakol.


4

According to this site, the bracha is ha'adama, no matter what: "There are some fruits and vegetables which even after a thorough mashing are recognizable due to their unique texture. The examples I know for sure are bananas, eggplant, and potatoes. Therefore, finely mashed potatoes are nevertheless Ha’adoma."


4

There are problems with food from a vegan restaurant. See this Chabad site A vegan restaurant would not have a hard time getting kosher certification. However, as long as there is no such certification one should not eat there. There are many reasons why a strictly vegan establishment requires kosher certification. Here are a few of them: ...


4

This depends on the Hashgacha. Some Hashgachot on broccoli are only signing off on the purposefully present ingredients and processing equipment, but are not addressing the requirement for Bedika (Triangle-K for example on a lot of frozen produce (See here)). Others are signing off that they indeed already performed a Bedika (typically via Chazaka) and ...


4

The Rambam (Kilayim 1:3) and the Shulchan Aruch (YD 297:2) explicitly rule that the issue of Kilaei Zeraim (planting mixtures of edible seeds (except grapes)) only applies in the Land of Israel and a Jew can even plant his own mixtures outside of Israel on purpose. So I think we can reason a fortiori that your friend is allowed to keep his vegetables when he ...


4

What I'd heard about the baby-cut carrots was a wheat-based enzyme used to keep them nice and bright orange (not a coloring per se), which posed a problem for Passover, but not the rest of the year. There are the problems with fruit grown in the first 3/4 years, as well as all sorts of special rules for produce grown in Israel. Also, there's some ...


4

Fruits from a tree are forbidden to eat for the first three years. This is called Orlah. And, although I can't find a link now, the OU requires baby carrots have a hechsher, since the manufacturers use a color lock to keep the nice orange color. The color lock is an edible spray that is sprayed on the carrot before it is put in the bags.


4

I know of Satmar, Bobov, Belz who also only eat peeled fruit and vegetables on Pesach.


3

In Breslev we wash fruits and vegetables thoroughly. If one is concerned about chometz in the coating, they consult their Rov. Speaking for myself, it's not something I concern myself with.


3

I can only speak of sephardi custom, but there the custom is to make HaEitz on the pomegranate, adamah on something like the beans, and hakol on either the meat items(heart, lung, head). This order can typically be found in any Sephardi Mahzor. The two I am most familiar with are Ish Matzliah and Shulhan Melekhim.


2

See the desserts question. Common Ashkenazic practice is that fresh fruit warrants its own bracha. But not vegetables.


2

As always, CYLOR. But here's what I found while looking around the web: From here: 330. The outside leaves of lettuce which are not fit for eating may be taken off on Shabbos in order to reach the good leaves, provided that this is done just before the meal. Lettuce leaves may be examined on Shabbos to make sure there are no insects on them. Insects ...


2

As a contrast to the manna, which was described as "lechem min hashamayim." "Shamayim" goes with "aretz." Not to mention that's how the verse in Psalms (Borchi Nafshi, like we say after davening on Rosh Chodesh) has it -- lehotzee lechem min ha'aretz.


2

The rules of berachos are dependent on the time and place. For example, in earlier times the bracha on carrots was shehakol since they were not eaten raw, whereas today their bracha is ha'adamah since they are eaten raw. Poskim in each generation evaluate the prevalent eating habits in their locale and issue a ruling accordingly. (Mishne Berurah 208: 18 ...


1

I actually had lunch with a mashgiach over Shabbos. I can't cite all of his sources, but we actually discussed this and he told me the following: Because of environmental and health concerns, the pesticides we use are much more benign than those used as little as 25 years ago. We have infestations that would be simple to get rid of, but we don't. Because ...


1

This article by Nishmat's Rabbi David Sperling explains the issues of non-kosher utensils and bishul akum (2 and 4 from the Chabad site) more in-depth, including when they apply. He also goes into a few other issues such as mar'it ayin, cold and sharp foods, and additional concerns in Israel. (The article isn't specifically about vegan restaurants but is ...


1

You should CYLOR for a final ruling, but it seems (Shach and Taz to YD 84:13, Chochmat Adam 52:9, see also Rama OC 553:3 (however see Shu"t R Akiva Eiger 76)) there should be no problem blending the fruit as the intention is to prepare the food not to nullify the insects. Once the insects are cut up, they are nullified in the mixture (YD 101:6). ...


1

The laws of brochos are very difficult. CYLOR. But I found at OU guide to blessings and “The Halachos of Brochos” by Rabbi Y P Bodner that “the blessing on candied fruit peels that are not usually eaten is 'shehakol'”. OU quotes the Chazon Ish, Orach Chaim 33b. I assume the law is the same for potatoes. Now all you have to do is determine whether potato ...


1

There are issues of infestation at times with red/purple cabbage. http://usours.com/red-cabbage-infestation-839 http://matzav.com/kashrus-alert-infestation-in-fresh-red-cabbage


1

7 minnim wouldn't matter. The only time the nature of the food will affect the ikkar/tafel status is by the 5 minim which, if significant, will take on the status of an ikar (if another food is your subjective ikar, you may now have 2 ikarim). Additionally, some say that ikar/tofel is the reasoning behind bread/wine exempting other food/drinks.



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