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12

Interestingly, Daas Zekeinim and Kli Yakar (to Gen. 32:8) say that when Yaakov heard that Eisav was planning to attack, he was distressed thinking that this must mean that indeed Yitzchak was already dead and that Eisav therefore feels free to kill him. Rashbam (to 32:7) suggests that indeed Eisav meant well in coming out towards Yaakov with his 400 men - ...


9

It branches off the Jordan river, running eastward through Gilead, just north of Mt Nebo and to the south of the Bashan. Today it is known as the Wadi Zerqa ("Blue River"). See the maps on pages 38 and 115 of Anson Rainey and Steven Notley, The Sacred Bridge (Jerusalem: Carta, 2006), and the information in Randall W. Younker, "Jabbok" in Anchor Bible ...


8

Your suggestion is correct. "Took" refers to the animals, "captured" refers to the women and children, and "plundered" refers to the wealth and objects from their houses. See Malbim. Technically, everything was "in the city". I would suggest that the phrase "וְאֵת אֲשֶׁר בָּעִיר וְאֶת אֲשֶׁר בַּשָּׂדֶה" refers to the animals mentioned immediately before. ...


8

1) From ילקוט ראובני : וגם הולך לקראתך וארבע מאות איש עמו, ארבע מאות איש שנטל עשו שנשא מחלת בת ישמעאל על נשיו, וירש ארבע מאות כתות החיצונים ששולטים עליהם מחל"ת ולילי"ת, נשים בגימטריא ארבע מאות, וזהו מרבה נשי"ם מרבה כשפי"ם 2) See also http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=20767&pgnum=89 3) From ספר הישר, cited in אוצר המספרים: בני שעיר ...


8

Berachos 12b-13a כיוצא בו אתה אומר (בראשית לה, י) "לא יקרא שמך עוד יעקב כי אם ישראל יהיה שמך" לא שיעקר יעקב ממקומו אלא ישראל עיקר ויעקב טפל לו Similarly we find "Your name shall not be called Yaakov any longer, rather Yisrael shall be your name" - not that the name Yaakov is uprooted from its place, rather that Yisrael is the primary name and Yaakov ...


7

The Mishnah (Chullin 100b) records a debate between R' Yehudah and the Sages about this. According to the majority view, the verse that records the prohibition was indeed inserted there at the time of the Giving of the Torah - i.e., this is Moshe (speaking in Hashem's name, of course) telling the people: "Therefore, [from now on,] the Children of Israel are ...


7

Among the many explanations of what it means when we say that the Avos kept the Torah (as in the linked question) is that they did so on a spiritual level. R. Shneur Zalman of Liadi thus states in one of his Chassidic discourses (Va'eira 5572): קיים אאע״ה כל התורה כולה עד שלא ניתנה וכן ביעקב עם לבן גרתי ותרי״ג מצות שמרתי והיינו רק ברוחנית שהרי לא יתכן ...


6

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l states (Likkutei Sichos, vol. 15, p. 269), based on his analysis of the relevant verses, that the one camp contained Yaakov's livestock and the people responsible for taking care of them, while the other contained his family. The point of this, the Rebbe explains, was that Yaakov was preparing for his prayer, in which he would, so ...


6

It's very possible that this was the talk of the area. Rambam Hilchos Melachim 9:15 says: ובן נח שעבר על אחת משבע מצות אלו יהרג בסייף. ומפני זה נתחייבו כל בעלי שכם הריגה. שהרי שכם גזל והם ראו וידעו ולא דנוהו And Noahides that transgress one of these Seven Mitzvos are killed with a sword. And for this reason all the inhabitants of Shechem were ...


6

The Ramban on the story quotes the Rambam as saying that the inhabitants of Shechem were required to judge (the person) Shechem and did not. As such, they did not fulfill the obligation of the descendants of Noach to judge justly. A descendant of Noach that fails to fulfill one if his 7 obligations (namely 1. belief in the creator, 2. prohibition of incest, ...


6

There are two things that would contradict your assumptions in your question. 1 - Rashi on Breishit 32:14 cites a Midrash saying that Ya'akov included precious stones and diamonds. 2 - Breishit 36:6-7 states that Esav had a lot of herds / cattle and because he had so much the land was not big enough to hold both his and Ya'akov's cattle, which is one of ...


6

The Rosh and Chizkuni (in his second explanation) and Daas Z'kenim answer that the maidservants' sons didn't bow, as they thought that they, as freemen, were more important than their mothers. That's why it says "bowed" in the feminine: only women bowed. [Presumably "and their children" in the verse refers to approaching.] Chizkuni's first explanation is ...


6

The Torah Lodaas sheet published weekly by Rabbi Matis Blum, in its Vayishlach 2014 issue, quotes the G'riz as follows (in my own translation): In truth, the response of Yaakov's sons was not merely to fool [the Shechemites] into circumcising themselves so they'd be able to kill them. Rather, it was a truthful response to Chamor's words: he had told them ...


5

It always seemed to me from reading the pesukim (and it seems Or HaChayim understands it this way as well) that the name of the place was Penuel and only Yaakov called it Peniel, presumably punning off the existing name of the place. Note that the location is mentioned many other times in Tanach and always as Penuel (Shoftim 8:8,9,17 Melachim 1:12:25 and I'd ...


5

I have no source for this answer, and I may very well be wrong, but here goes anyway: Look at the expression Rashi brings: "ושרבב קומתו" Now this word "ושרבב" rang a bell to me. Where is it used in other places? 1) Regarding the daughter of Pharoh who stretched out her hand - Rashi on Shemot 2:5 והם דרשו את אמתה את ידה, שנשתרבבה אמתה אמות הרבה: ...


5

The experience was needed for a good reason. It's interesting that because of this fight, he was told he would get the name Yisrael. Some explanations include: The experience taught Yaakov that he was strong enough. You don't know your own strength until you're put to the test. You don't activate your full potential unless you're put to the test. (I ...


5

YS cites Pinchas' killing of Zimri (Bamidbar chapter 25) as an example of Shimon and Levi's “parting of ways.” YS's question can be strengthened with further illustrations of the ambiguity and tension that seems to surround these two charcters. In Bereshit, Levi and Shimon are both severely reprimanded in the blessings of Yaakov at the end of his life: ...


4

The Midrash (cited in my comments to YS' answer) gives the following analogy: It's like two people who borrowed money from the king. One paid back his debt, and indeed later was able to lend to the king. The other not only failed to repay, but borrowed again. Similarly, Shimon and Levi both "borrowed" (became indebted to G-d) at Shechem. Levi repaid his ...


4

I am pretty sure that this depends on which minhag you hold to. The question is easiest answered if you hold a standard Ashkenazi minhag, as you can hear it read by an expert Hazzan here. A friend who trained to be a Hazan at YU told me that this was a resource his instructors gave him.


4

Ya'akov couldn't be "mekayem" (to perform?) all the miztvot. For example Kivud av (honoring your parents) and Yishuv Eretz Yisrael (live in Israel). So here "shamarti" may mean something different. When Ya'akov heard Yosef's dream (Breshit 37:11) the Torah writes that he "shamar" the dream. Rashi writes: שמר את הדבר - היה ממתין ומצפה מתי יבא, he waited ...


4

As @rony points out, there were many mitzvot that Yaakov had no way of keeping while he was in the house of Laban. Some examples include all the mitzvot that are dependent on the Land (e.g. Trumah) and Mitzvot that are dependent on the congregation (e.g. appointing a king). @Alex brings other examples in his answer. If so, how could Yaakov say "עם לבן גרתי ...


4

The Gutnick Chumash brings the Lubavitcher Rebbe's explanation of the verse according to Rashi. Read it for full detail, but in short: Yaakov was sure that G-d would protect his family. He was not sure that G-d would keep his fortune intact. He therefore split his family and their essentials in one camp, and the rest of his fortune in the other camp. ...


4

Minchas Shay says it's a matter of dispute: יש מרז״ל מפרשים אותו קדש ויש מפרשים אותו חול עיין ב״ר וחולין פרק גיד הנשה ועיין מ״ש סוף פ׳ ויצא Some of our rabbis explain it as holy, and some explain it as secular. See B'reshis Raba and Chulin (the chapter Gid hanashe) and see what I wrote at the end of the section Vayetze. Following the links: ...


4

Rashi on that verse brings a medrash Gen.Rabbah 83:2 that says the eight kings correspond to the first eight jewish kings. Edom came to autonomous power only during the rule of the ninth king.


4

Ramban (verse 14) says it's because that's what he had at hand.


4

I have also seen that Yaakov was hinting that the bracha (which was mainly agricultural) had not helped him. The bracha from Hashem was in his flocks which had not been mentioned by Yitzchak. Yaakov was also hinting that everything he had was from the hard work and knowledge of husbandry which he had as well as a bracha from Hashem granted to him while he ...


4

Sforno says that it shows that even though Yaakov knew, he didn't disown Reuven, because he knew that he did tshuvah immediately. Both Ramban and Radak say that because of what Reuven did, Yaakov had twelve sons, i.e. he did not have any more children after this. Additionally, the Gemara in Shabbat 55b (phrase 27 in Sefaria) says that he moved Yaakov's bed ...


3

As @DoubleAA noted above, several other verses use the same language. Let's assume, though, that we cannot compare them, and that the phrase may change meaning based on context. Then we may only glean information from commentators' comments on this verse specifically. After perusing the sources, here are the mefarshim that support the "הוּא" == "הַהוּא" ...


3

Many words have a special form used only when the word occurs at a point in the sentence when a reader would pause while reading, called the 'pausal form'. 'Shmekha' with the segol under the mem is the pausal form of this word; 'Shimkha' is the regular, non-pausal form. Whether a word occurs at a point of pause or flows on to the next word is indicated by ...


3

To the question of Rachel and Leah's mother mocdeg brought down this answer, which would make them only half sisters which may then be allowed. The sefer Tiferes Shlomo al HaTorah in Parshas Vayetze brings a number of answers to the question of how Yaakov was allowed to marry two sisters. One of the answers is that Rachel and Leah were born to Lavan ...



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